Dutch spies helped GCHQ break Argentine crypto during Falklands War

Can you give any examples of where the BBC has demonstrated a Marxist viewpoint?
I would argue they are "woke", socially liberal.
But not Marxist.

And you get to see Steph Flanders in a boiler suit and have the opportunity to shout 'b*ll*cks!' when Tariq Ali offers an opinion. Bonus!

I have a feeling this may not be quite what you meant, though...
 

endure

GCM
A nice soundbite, but "good manners" would include not shouting down people just because you disagree with them.
That's where political correctness started from but like most things it's been snatched and used by the intolerant to beat us over the head with.
 
Last edited:
Can you give any examples of where the BBC has demonstrated a Marxist viewpoint?
I would argue they are "woke", socially liberal.
But not Marxist.
Keep in mind that some on here see Thatcher as a wet...
 
I agree. The BBC is mostly quite informative and impartial.
They are definitely "woke", but that's probably because the young urban graduates they recruit, are all "woke".
If you look at any similar organisations, with a similar workforce, you'll see the same "woke" attitude. It's ingrained and instinctive.
A pals son has just joined them, he went into investment banking initially, after two years was looking for something else. No woke at all.

It's as lazy as labelling all services as right wing lunatics...


....when going by this site it's only 95%
 

ACAB

LE
Oh dear, PA, do we really need to go down this road again? You want me to list the number of occasions, that I can think of simply off the top of my head, where the Army's initial statement about an incident (and which was immediately carried by the media) when subject to further investigation was later found to be somewhat lacking in the ol' verite?
Remind me again what did you write about the incident on the Mall in 1981??? When the Queen was ambushed??
 
Hastings put it in his memoir, fwiw.
I seem to recall it in the book, 'Don't cry for me Sgt Major' - Hastings was one of the authors of this IIRC. In that a story went that a correspondent used a civvy phone line to contact someone at a location that the Brits were advancing towards and immediately got a bollocking for - turns out that the latter was a bit of a wind up but he was a little naughty and perhaps naïve. In the book the guy involved was utterly distraught that he might have put Brit lives at risk (and perhaps that of himself and his fellow correspondents).
 
I seem to recall it in the book, 'Don't cry for me Sgt Major' - Hastings was one of the authors of this IIRC. In that a story went that a correspondent used a civvy phone line to contact someone at a location that the Brits were advancing towards and immediately got a bollocking for - turns out that the latter was a bit of a wind up but he was a little naughty and perhaps naïve. In the book the guy involved was utterly distraught that he might have put Brit lives at risk (and perhaps that of himself and his fellow correspondents).
Don't remember the bollocking bit but I think the call may have been to or from Fitzroy.
 
Not off the top of your head. preferably with evidence. In your own time, carry on.
Alright, it will take me a couple of hours to get them all together, I'll list the major incidents first and then the individuals as I recall them, but as my memory is weak I will have to resort to Lost Lives and other sources, which I will list.

These will all be incidents, often referred to as "disputed killings" in the Troubles from 1969-1998 in which the Army's initial version was proven to be, at the very least somewhat inaccurate, and at the worst downright lies.

But just to save me the time, are you saying no such incident occurred? I mean even in late January 1972 in a backwater town in the northwest of the province? Do you at least concede that in that incident the Army was telling porkies? Because if you don't, even after all the mountains of forensic evidence to the contrary, I am not sure there is much I can do to convince you.
 

Dr Death

Old-Salt
Did the Junta get secrets about the U.K. from other countries?
The French helped out the argies with planes & missiles but chose the wrong side to back.
A few South American countries while publicly support the junta helped FCO with low grade but important intel.
 
The French helped out the argies with planes & missiles but chose the wrong side to back.
A few South American countries while publicly support the junta helped FCO with low grade but important intel.
I think its fairer to say that elements within a number of nations had differing stances.
The standard of missile recognition by the Brazilian Air Force, for instance, was pleasingly Nelsonian.
 
It was commonly reported at the time , and there are even photographs of the Bears and trawlers .
Troops were briefed not to dump sensitive information overboard with the rubbish , as the Sovs might scoop it up for analysis .
The troops responded by dumping pictures of ugly would be pen pals overboard , in the hope Soviet intelligence would report low morale throughout the task Force ( in one of the books , possibly " Excursion to hell " )
 

Bob65

Old-Salt
Well to me, Marxism means socialism and state ownership and control of industry. I've never seen the BBC push that agenda.
That was one of Marx's desired outcomes sure, but what he was really about was the idea that the way to analyse history was to look at classes and how they interacted and had different interests leading to conflict.

For example if you consider that "remain" was very much the preference of the upper-middle class and that "leave" was the preferred option of the working class, then it's very obvious why the BBC's coverage looked as it did. Left/right or socialism/capitalism wasn't anything to do with it.

I'd imagine the BBC of the day also saw itself as international and cosmopolitan and found nationalism/patriotism distasteful.
 
Last edited:

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
Alright, it will take me a couple of hours to get them all together, I'll list the major incidents first and then the individuals as I recall them, but as my memory is weak I will have to resort to Lost Lives and other sources, which I will list.

These will all be incidents, often referred to as "disputed killings" in the Troubles from 1969-1998 in which the Army's initial version was proven to be, at the very least somewhat inaccurate, and at the worst downright lies.

But just to save me the time, are you saying no such incident occurred? I mean even in late January 1972 in a backwater town in the northwest of the province? Do you at least concede that in that incident the Army was telling porkies? Because if you don't, even after all the mountains of forensic evidence to the contrary, I am not sure there is much I can do to convince you.
This isn't about that utter shambles, start a new thread.
 
I'm not sure why the USSR would want to help the Argentinean government. I doubt they really cared who won the Falklands War. The British Forces were always of little significance, compared to the Americans, when it came to Cold War Europe.

I can understand why they may have been interested in gaining knowledge about British Forces communications and cryptography etc.

Maybe the USSR provided some kind of support to the Argentinean government, in return for information on the British Forces? I don't see why the Argentinean government would just help the USSR without anything in return.
ISTR the Junta sent a shopping list , but by the time it was looked at , let alone processed , the war had ended .
There were deep divisions within the Junta about accepting Soviet help , for ideological and domestic political reasons , after all , they overthrew Isabel Peron's because it had lost it's grip in the fight against Montonero and ERP terrorists , the latter of which were avowedly Marxist .
The Junta proclaimed itself to be anti Marxist and the bastion of catholicism , family values and law and order .
They could hardly then turn round and say they'd become a Soviet client state and retain a shred of credibility , even though they accepted Montonero help in Operacion Algeciras .
 
Last edited:

Latest Threads

Top