Dust off the Blue Berets - Sudan

#25
So, what happened?
 
#26
Having worked in Sudan I can happily confirm it is a redders midden with no redeeming features

Only the vultures do good business and get in the field and the locals can't be arrse to wear anything but some pretty, tribal facial scarring
 
#27
Having worked in Sudan I can happily confirm it is a redders midden with no redeeming features

Only the vultures do good business and get in the field and the locals can't be arrse to wear anything but some pretty, tribal facial scarring
The last sentence sounds not unlike some places in the UK....
Sounds like the bottom end of a khazi.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#28
I had an RMP mate who was there for 6 months some years ago, he was running CP for the embassy. He told tales of visiting outposts and forts from the time of Gordon Pasha and had a goodly selection of snaps taken with the Box Brownie. He said that when they entered some of the remoter arguably still 'British owned' military outposts and it was quite clear that the natives had never set foot in them, ever. This was to the extent of finding still sealed crates of rifles still in their wrappers along with ammo and lots of other paraphenalia. From the pics it wasn't one of those situations where it looked like they had all had breakfast and simply vanished leaving everything behind, but it was close in a couple of locations.
My brother's first Diplomatic Service post was to Khartoum. In 1971 there was a civil war. Reports of tanks firing on the embassy. Just as me mum and I went on holiday to Austria. She was wetting herself. Our tour guide did a good job of getting whatever information he could.

We got a letter home. Three machine gun bullets in the embassy wall.
 
#29
My brother's first Diplomatic Service post was to Khartoum. In 1971 there was a civil war. Reports of tanks firing on the embassy. Just as me mum and I went on holiday to Austria. She was wetting herself. Our tour guide did a good job of getting whatever information he could.

We got a letter home. Three machine gun bullets in the embassy wall.
That ND must have cost a packet.

....I'll get me coat....
 
#30
Having worked in Sudan I can happily confirm it is a redders midden with no redeeming features

Only the vultures do good business and get in the field and the locals can't be arrse to wear anything but some pretty, tribal facial scarring
You forgot the famine.
 
#32
This is Juba??
 
#34
A friend of mine flew his aircraft into Khartoum about three years ago, with one or two other adventurers travelling to Cape Town. He landed, parked up and went through the ritual of avoiding paying an exorbitant landing fee and got accomodation and the prevailing attitude was "famine? what famine? war, pestilence, disease, sudden death? nah, not around here, mate"
 
#35
Spent some time in Sudan in the late seventies/early 80's including the south before it was independent, and met some fantastic locals, warm, generous, eager to chat about the state of affairs. Even met one guy, a concierge, when we were staying at a government rest house in the north, who had started there under the Brits pre- independance, moaning about how nothing worked properly since the British left whilst he cooked an excellent fish and chip supper. Mind you, we were also held at gunpoint by a very drunk Dinka guy almost in uniform for a very frightening half hour, standing darkness in just my boxers with thoughts of abduction going through my head. The scariest bit was when he stopped questioning us because he'd clearly run out of English, and given that we'd heard plenty of gunfire before he rocked up with his rusty Lee Enfield, I was afraid he'd shoot someone to cover up the awkward silence. In the end he waved us back into the block and wandered off to find someone else to intimidate. Turned out he was a conscript who was supposed to be on guard duty on the compound, but after a skinful decided to express his dissatisfaction with life using live ammunition.
Anyway, I guess my point is, such countries are more than you would believe from the TV coverage. There are plenty of nice folk, just trying to do the best for their kids, pissed up squaddies, and yes, a few psychos who would cheerfully hack you to pieces. One shame is that in the north, once very laid back, the influx of money from gulf states has made it compulsory to be overtly religious these days.
 

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