Dulse

#1
I've been given a bag of Dulse. To say it smells strange (and quite strong) is an understatement. I've had a little nibble on it as it says you can eat it right from the bag, but that is a no-go folks! Too much seaside flavour for my palette.

It says on the bag "also can be used in cooking to flavour or as a seasoning".

Any tried and tested recipes out there?

Wishy :D
 
#2
Its Sea weed! thats why it tastes like shite, my uncle eats the stuff straight from the bag, wierdo!

Apparently though:

It can also be pan fried quickly into chips, baked in the oven covered with cheese, with salsa. It can also be used in soups, chowders, sandwiches and salads, or added to bread/pizza dough. Finely diced, it can also be used as a flavour enhancer in meat dishes, such as chili, in place of monosodium glutamate.
 
#3
Its quit nice with gratted cheese on toast, in a salad or deep fried , or just used instead of salt in cooking

You can try it as a replacment for Laverbread,
try this Bacon pieces chopped and fried, mixed with Oats, an egg, dulse, pepper and salt to taste, make into burger sized pates and fry or grill until golden brown serve with blackpudding for breakfast
 
#5
American Dulse Pesto Sauce
Ingredients:

40g dried American dulse
175ml of olive oil
50 g pine kernels
3 garlic cloves
50g fresh basil leaves
50g fresh flat leaf parsley
50g fresh Parmesan cheese
Directions:

Make the pesto first from scratch. Using a food processor takes 30 seconds to combine all the pesto ingredients, stop and turn over by spatula and a final 30 seconds to blend. By hand, a cook can chop finely the seaweed, herbs, garlic and pine kernels and add finely grated fresh Parmesan cheese.
Cook the spaghetti in a large pan of boiling water, drain and refresh briefly under cold water.
Return the cooler spaghetti to the pan with olive oil and turn over well in the pan.
Add the pesto, four tablespoons at a time until the cook’s and companion/s desired level of spaghetti sauce.

It says American Dulse, but you could ask any bog trotter you may know to get you some.
 
#6
Irish Dulse Soda Scones

450g (1lb) Plain White Flour
1 tsp Bicarbonate of Soda
340ml (12fl oz) Buttermilk or Sour Cream
1 Egg, beaten
½ oz Dried Dulse
1 tsp Salt

Pre-heat oven to 200°C; 400°F: Gas 6
Place a baking sheet in the oven to heat.
Soak the dulse in water for five minutes.
Discard the water and chop the dulse into fine strips.
Sieve the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt into a large cool mixing bowl, mixing thoroughly.
Add the chopped dulse.
Make a well in the centre and pour in most of the buttermilk.
Work around the bowl, drawing the flour into the buttermilk, until absorbed.
When the dough comes together it should feel soft but pliable, add more buttermilk if needed.
Turn onto a floured board, knead lightly.
Using the palm your hand, shape the dough out into a round about 1 inch thick.
Either score the surface into four or six, or use a biscuit cutter to cut out rounds.
Brush lightly with the beaten egg.
Place on the heated baking tray and bake in the preheated oven for 20-25 minutes.
 
#7
Dulse ,olives and Garlic chopped on toast is another nice snack
Its Sea Lettuce so just use it as lettuce
 
#8
Roy I really like the idea of the Soda Scones. I think I will do that. Thank you.

But I'm also going to keep some by for the cheese on toast idea from Tropper.

Thank you lovely boys! :blowkiss:

Wishy
 
#9
Wishful_Thinking said:
Roy I really like the idea of the Soda Scones. I think I will do that. Thank you.

But I'm also going to keep some by for the cheese on toast idea from Tropper.

Thank you lovely boys! :blowkiss:

Wishy
Try useing wholemeal Pitta bread stuffed and poped in micro for a minute
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#10
So let me get this straight? Dulse, seaweed the Irish re-brand as food, and the Septics buy it to make scones? Right.

Rocket. A roadside weed the Italians re-brand as salad and flog to Tesco? Right.

Whats next? The seleniferous weeds of Iran re-branded as a Yoghurt ingredient?

I can barely contain my excitement.
 
#11
Wishful_Thinking said:
Roy I really like the idea of the Soda Scones. I think I will do that. Thank you.

But I'm also going to keep some by for the cheese on toast idea from Tropper.

Thank you lovely boys! :blowkiss:

Wishy
I may try the scones myself but usually when I make scones I use half white flour and half whole wheat flour. I also usually mix in a bit of butter with the dry ingrediants by hand before adding the buttermilk.
 
#12
TheIronDuke said:
So let me get this straight? Dulse, seaweed the Irish re-brand as food, and the Septics buy it to make scones? Right.

Rocket. A roadside weed the Italians re-brand as salad and flog to Tesco? Right.

Whats next? The seleniferous weeds of Iran re-branded as a Yoghurt ingredient?

I can barely contain my excitement.
You forgot to mention Dandelion and Burdock!
 
#14
Gremlin said:
TheIronDuke said:
So let me get this straight? Dulse, seaweed the Irish re-brand as food, and the Septics buy it to make scones? Right.

Rocket. A roadside weed the Italians re-brand as salad and flog to Tesco? Right.

Whats next? The seleniferous weeds of Iran re-branded as a Yoghurt ingredient?

I can barely contain my excitement.
You forgot to mention Dandelion and Burdock!
My bold - one of nature's 'viagras' I'll have you know.
As for dulse...... hmmnnn. Very high in 'iron' if you have blood issues, though in Ireland, Guinness won the flavour race on that one.
 
#15
jarrod248 said:
Gremlin said:
TheIronDuke said:
So let me get this straight? Dulse, seaweed the Irish re-brand as food, and the Septics buy it to make scones? Right.

Rocket. A roadside weed the Italians re-brand as salad and flog to Tesco? Right.

Whats next? The seleniferous weeds of Iran re-branded as a Yoghurt ingredient?

I can barely contain my excitement.
You forgot to mention Dandelion and Burdock!
I'll raise you with a horseradish.
You aren't raising your horseradish anywhere near my Burdock mate! :D
 
#16
When my dad was growing up here in Massachusetts before WW I they would buy a bag of dried salted dulse and eat it like crisps. He and my aunts all loved it but that was 100 years ago.

All of us probably eat some seaweed. Carageen is a gelling agent made from Irish Moss (caragín in Irish). Almost all ice cream and a lot of puddings, shakes at fast food places, etc include carageen as an ingrediant. Look at an ice cream container.

In Ireland a couple of years ago I had a carageen desert. They boil milk with carageen in it, strain out the carageen, add sugar and flarouring and serve. The stuff I had had a nice bit of Bailey's Irish Cream liquor in it. Very tasty if you don't mind a bit of alcohol.

They used to harvest the stuff in the town where I live. Teenage boys would go out in large rowboats and pull it up with long rakes, bring it to the dock and sell it. Very popular for young athletes as they could make money doing something that built up their upper body strength, back etc. The industry has moved to Maine now. They still use students as the stuff grows primarily June-September.
 
#18
Gracie said:
We were forced to eat this as kids 'because its full of goodness' apparantly.... never eaten it since though...
Based on what my dad told me; in the old days many people suffered from iodine deficiency. Nowadays, most table salt contains a little iodine but in my dads day dulse was considered a good source of iodine. All that was a long time ago of course, when dad was born Victoria was Queen and McKinley was president of the US.
 
#19
Dont you get something like this in Chinese restaraunts as a starter? I know that in NI I was told that a certain town was good for' dulse and yellow man'. the yellow man being honeycomb.
 

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