Drone & counter drone technology.

"I have a very amusing story. Which I'm not going to tell you."

Speaking as a former boffin (in another place), I am agog. Do tell.
Suffice to say it involved a (very) lengthy study which had been initiated internally to place something on one of our ISR platforms. The DSTL chaps thought they were on to something and enthusiastically briefed to an audience of relevant SMEs. Unfortunately, the first question from the audience resulted in a stunned and embarrassed silence from the Boffins who had entirely missed a fairly fundamental factor which would have precluded the original role of the platform!

Boffins are great. But it's good to talk!

Regards,
MM
 
Canada is looking at buying a second hand "drone" from Germany. Transport Canada looking at used German drone to patrol Arctic | CBC News
The Associated Press reported on Monday that Canada was negotiating with Germany to purchase a secondhand Global Hawk surveillance drone, which originally cost the Germans $823 million.
It is the Ministry of Transport, not Defence which is looking at it, as one of a number of different options. It would be used to track shipping, monitor oil spills, and do ice surveys in Canada's Arctic waters.
Marie-Anyk Cote said the plan is to buy an aircraft to detect and monitor oil spills, survey ice levels and marine habitats and keep track of shipping and ice movement in Canada's far northern waters.
The deal would include the aircraft, two ground stations, and spare parts.
The news surfaced in a response to lawmakers tabled by the German government in the Bundestag, Germany's parliament. It stated that Germany has decided to "begin concrete negotiations with Canada for the sale of the Euro Hawk aircraft, two ground stations and possibly certain spare parts."
The Euro Hawk is a version of the Northrop Grumman Global Hawk, which NG had previously tried to sell to Canada's defence ministry.
Northrop Grumman, the maker of the Global Hawk, pitched the Canadian military on buying the high-altitude surveillance system a few years ago.
This one was bought by the Germans in 2000, but has flown only a handful of times. The Germans were unable to get it certified to fly in Europe, and the manufacturer (Northrop presumably) refused to share technical data with the German government and lacked an anti-collision alarm as required by air safety regulators.
The drone under consideration by Transport Canada is a prototype that was purchased by the Germans in 2000, according the AP report.

It has flown only a handful of times; the program was cancelled because of skyrocketing costs and the German government's inability to get it certified to fly in Europe. According to 2013 German media reports, the manufacturer had refused to share technical data with the German government and the drone lacked an anti-collision alarm required by European regulators.
The drone being offered to Canada has been "demilitarized", with the US made communications, GPS, and flight control system stripped out.
According to the German government's written response, the drone has now been "demilitarized" — meaning it has been stripped of its U.S.-made radio equipment, GPS receiver and flight control system.
There are complications to the deal relating to international arms treaties which would classify the drone as a missile.
A year ago, CBC News reported the Arctic drone surveillance program had been delayed because of complex international arms control rules that would categorize the unmanned aircraft as a missile.

(...)
The Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), adopted by Canada and 34 other countries, was intended to prevent the spread of weapons systems that can deliver nuclear missiles. Drones were added to the list recently and the rules restrict missiles and drones from carrying a payload of more than 500 kilograms or travelling more than 300 kilometres.
A fully loaded Global Hawk can carry a sensor suite payload weighing up to 540 kilograms.
I suspect that what may happen if this option is pursued is that the air frame will be handed over to an aerospace company in Canada who would outfit it with new control, navigation, and surveillance systems.

Here is the Ministry of Transport's project web page.
https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/programs-po...veillance-program/drones-canadian-arctic.html


The Defence Ministry has their own long range "drone" program, but that isn't expected to bear fruit until 2021.
National Defence has its own, separate drone program which is not expected to start delivering aircraft until 2021. That new fleet will not be fully operational until 2023.
 
Canada is looking at buying a second hand "drone" from Germany. Transport Canada looking at used German drone to patrol Arctic | CBC News


It is the Ministry of Transport, not Defence which is looking at it, as one of a number of different options. It would be used to track shipping, monitor oil spills, and do ice surveys in Canada's Arctic waters.


The deal would include the aircraft, two ground stations, and spare parts.


The Euro Hawk is a version of the Northrop Grumman Global Hawk, which NG had previously tried to sell to Canada's defence ministry.


This one was bought by the Germans in 2000, but has flown only a handful of times. The Germans were unable to get it certified to fly in Europe, and the manufacturer (Northrop presumably) refused to share technical data with the German government and lacked an anti-collision alarm as required by air safety regulators.


The drone being offered to Canada has been "demilitarized", with the US made communications, GPS, and flight control system stripped out.


There are complications to the deal relating to international arms treaties which would classify the drone as a missile.


I suspect that what may happen if this option is pursued is that the air frame will be handed over to an aerospace company in Canada who would outfit it with new control, navigation, and surveillance systems.

Here is the Ministry of Transport's project web page.
https://www.tc.gc.ca/en/programs-po...veillance-program/drones-canadian-arctic.html


The Defence Ministry has their own long range "drone" program, but that isn't expected to bear fruit until 2021.
Let me get this right.

Some Canadian civilians are considering buying some of the most advanced military RPAS in the World second hand; that will have been ‘demilitarized’ with all communications, GPS, and flight control system removed; over which there are MCTR legal issues; so an as yet unspecified Canadian company can retrofit a bespoke avionics system, thereby ensuring NG will absolutely, positively refuse to support it even if it works; so you can operate it in the Arctic where satellite coverage which is so essential to RPAS ops is problematic at best!

Is habitual drug abuse common in the Canadian Department of Transport?

Regards,
MM
 
Let me get this right.

Some Canadian civilians are considering buying some of the most advanced military RPAS in the World second hand; that will have been ‘demilitarized’ with all communications, GPS, and flight control system removed; over which there are MCTR legal issues; so an as yet unspecified Canadian company can retrofit a bespoke avionics system, thereby ensuring NG will absolutely, positively refuse to support it even if it works; so you can operate it in the Arctic where satellite coverage which is so essential to RPAS ops is problematic at best! (...)
As mentioned in my post, this is one option that is being considered. According to Canadian sources the government sent out requests to industry for information which could be used to evaluate the current state of technology.
Cote said "it is still premature to speculate which remotely piloted aircraft system will be purchased" and that the evaluation is still underway.
It is German sources which say that the Canadian government is negotiating with Germany over this.
The news surfaced in a response to lawmakers tabled by the German government in the Bundestag, Germany's parliament. It stated that Germany has decided to "begin concrete negotiations with Canada for the sale of the Euro Hawk aircraft, two ground stations and possibly certain spare parts."
Someone in industry will be backing this proposal. That however doesn't mean that this one will be going ahead.

Personally, I suspect the Ministry of Transport project will remain in the experimental phase until the DND's own project goes ahead, to allow the two to share infrastructure. Senior figures in the DND have said that they don't want to commit to a solution too soon, as the field is evolving rapidly.

With regards to satellite communications, I imagine that will come under this: https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-ST-046-32020
DND has initiated the ESCPP project to deliver both narrowband and wideband satellite communications (SATCOM) in the Arctic to the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) and potentially to other government departments and agencies (OGDAs) or allied partners. The project could include space and ground segments where a satellite constellation and ground terminals would be acquired and upgraded for Arctic operations.
Requirements include:
The ability to communicate voice and data information at any given time in the Arctic theatre of operations between 65° and 90° North latitude.
And:
The ability to provide sufficient throughput for operational and strategic communications requirements, to include; imagery, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR), streaming video and DND/CAF networks; ...
 
...It is German sources which say that the Canadian government is negotiating with Germany over this...
This could explain much!

Regards,
MM
 

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