Drinking to much

#1
Eeeerrrr I have this friend who is drinking to much. He is not an alky, doesn't need a drink in the morning, and if he hasn't got any it doesn't bother him. Dry exercises arn't an issue.

The trouble is when he does have some, he can't stop at one. Once it's run out no problem. But he is drinking way over the odds.

Any constructive advice you can give him to help him reduce his intake.

This isn't the NAAFI so useful advice only please.

Thanks

1IE
 
#2
Well he has to work on his self control, might be difficult but it can be overcome. The mind is a powerful thing.
 
#4
WhizzyShootingStar said:
Well he has to work on his self control, might be difficult but it can be overcome. The mind is a powerful thing.
Oi WhizzyShitLips !

When you're old enough to drink alcohol legally, you might be able to offer some real advice. :x

The mind is a wonderful thing ! :roll: :?
 
#5
1isEnough.

Have you spoken to your mate about it ? He may not realise.

1. Go on the lash by all means but try pacing, ie. make drinks last longer
2. Leave for the pubs/clubs later in the evening, leaving less time for boozing.
3. Go somewhere to eat first
4. Alternate an alcoholic beverage with a non alcoholic beverage
5. Set a ceiling of maximum units/jars/glasses not to be excelled
6. Sort him out a taxi before it's too late
7. All of the above
8. Nominate him as duty driver.
9. Seek expert advice - not Arrsers.
 
#6
arfah said:
WhizzyShootingStar said:
Well he has to work on his self control, might be difficult but it can be overcome. The mind is a powerful thing.
When you're old enough to drink alcohol legally, you might be able to offer some real advice. :roll:
I am and again I am. :roll:
 

B_AND_T

MIA
Book Reviewer
#7
Mariolario said:
Heroin , that should get him off it .
Well that was fcuking useful! He did ask for useful advice.

CNUT!!!
 
#8
WhizzyShootingStar said:
arfah said:
WhizzyShootingStar said:
Well he has to work on his self control, might be difficult but it can be overcome. The mind is a powerful thing.
When you're old enough to drink alcohol legally, you might be able to offer some real advice. :roll:
I am an immature bus stop stinking gwar and again I am incapable of offering any thing that resembles common sense in any serious concerns that a legitimate Arrser may have. Furthermore, I should really stick to Bebo or facebook where there is more chance of meeting fellow chavs

PS, Can anyone suggest a good tatooist as I want to join up all the orangey freckles on my face so they match the work that has been done on my fat gingery backside ! 8)
Well done WhizzyShitLips !
 
#9
If it really is a case of being tempted too easily, rather than reliance, cut off the supply of money.

If he goes out of an evening with just £20 in his pocket (adjust according to travel costs, food requirements, etc) and no credit or debit cards (preventing him obtaining more - friends need to be in on this, too), he will only be able to drink up to his financial limit.

If this doesn't work, it's probably not temptation that's the problem.
 
#10
Strangely enough, I had an, errrrr, friend who had exactly the same problem as your, errrrr, friend.

Most important thing I did, errr I mean he did was to accept that he had a problem. Unfortunately, my friend didn't catch the problem as quickly as your friend did and it was starting to affect his work. Turning up at noon still pi$$ed as a fart from the night before was not a career enhancer. But he did manage to nip things in the bud before full blown alcoholism set in.

Only thing I would add to arfah's excellent advice would be to try a week or two completely off the booze and away from social boozing. Perhaps a holiday somewhere you can't drink. More than anything, it'll show your friend that he can keep on the wagon for an extended period. Also, if things don't improve quickly, don't hesitate to see your doctor. The doc will have plenty of advice to help - not necessarily involving AA meetings.
 
#11
I too have a friend with a similar predicament, and he tends not to keep booze in the house, unless he has friends coming over.

I used to work with a guy who ended up getting caught drinking on the job and ended up getting the sack as it was also revealed that he was stealing to feed the habit. I felt really bad as although not overly close to him, I had seen some of the signs and only took it as far as a quiet chat rather than trying to get him any help.

If you're friend is also getting concerned, than tell him straight that it's the first step to admit there's a problem and see the doc for help. just remember that NHS is there to help niggles like this turning into problems.
 
#12
He has to want to change his habit himself before anything can be achieved. Unfortunately, trying to convince him is the hardest part. If you keep mentioning it to him, he will probably think you are just going on at him and get all defensive.

Try telling him of the advantages of not drinking so much. He'll live longer would be the main one.

He may say he will stop if he gets any health issues ... but once the liver has been affected, it cannot be rectified without major surgery.

My ex used to drink too much and I went to this this support group called ANON which is for friends and family of people who drink. I didn't get anything out of it, but maybe they can give you some good tips.
 
#13
Simple - Stop drinking until you can do so like a responsible adult human being with self discipline. Or limit your access. Only take cash out with you, no card.

Only have 2 cans in the fridge at any one time etc.

Basics
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#14
Alcohol over use and indulgence, to put it nicely, is perhaps common and whether it's thought an illness, a habit, or a disease is perhaps irrelevant.

It's also perhaps unnecessary to rub salt into people's wounds. There
might be some of us who enjoy a drink and there are certainly some who have a serious problem when it starts to affect their health, their appearance, and their lives. Not to condemn, but maybe a fact of life.

It might be the case that it's too easily available, too cheap and on view everywhere we look. If tobacco is to be removed from displays and put under the counter, why not alcohol too? Would it not be far better to support, than to encourage abuse for profit?
 
#15
Tremaine said:
It might be the case that it's too easily available, too cheap and on view everywhere we look. If tobacco is to be removed from displays and put under the counter, why not alcohol too? Would it not be far better to support, than to encourage abuse for profit?
Pubs already do this with their draught beer. ;)

It would cost a fortune for off licences and supermarkets to buy massive counters to stock the booze underneath, not to mention the increased staffing costs. Think again.
 
#16
The problem is if you(re) friend really, really enjoys it and doesn't suffer immediate negative consequences, like hangovers, getting beaten up, jailed or making an arse of himself. If you are past the stage when alcohol works brilliantly it's easy to offer advice - but up to (say) 26-27 there were days when I was going to get swambingoed.

Spacing out getting pished until the pressure reaches unbearable, and then constructing a binge on harm-minimization grounds (right company, stuff yourself before starting, safe environment, 4% beer...) you should find that it becomes easier to increase the time between lapses.
 
#17
Closet_Jibber said:
Simple - Stop drinking until you can do so like a responsible adult human being with self discipline. Or limit your access. Only take cash out with you, no card.

Only have 2 cans in the fridge at any one time etc.

Basics
Well that was useful :roll: . Quote: "Stop drinking until you can do so like a responsible adult human being with self discipline". It is very easy to judge when your on the outside isn't it. Without going into the causes, I have told you about the effect.

A problem has been identified, hopefully in the early stages. I asked for useful advice not holier than thou shite. Please read the initial post properly. Thanks!

Many thanks to the rest of you for some decent replies!!!

1IE
 
#18
I knew a man who was a social drinker, it was his favourite thing, and like your friend it was only closing time or an empty fridge that made him call it a night. He drank because it made him happy, he enjoyed it, and being around people. And it numbed all the crap on his mind. Things got progressively sh!t in his personal life and he would go to the pub more frequently, rarely engaging in social activities that didn't involve the pub or alcohol. His work started to suffer, his health deteriorated and as a result he spent more time at the pub to cheer himself up and be in a happy atmosphere. Six months on he had drunk himself to death.
 
#20
Any idea as to why he is drinking more now... It can be a response to stress or PTSD, so has he been on tour recently, or talk of issues that are stressing him out?

Personally i can't stop drinking, i can easily go months without a beer, but once i have one, i'll keep going till i've had my limit. The only thing i can do i recognise my problem and keep the sessions few and far between. It's also gotten worse since quitting smoking, so i'm pretty sure it's a dependence thing. ( i also strongly think it's stress related).
 

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