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Drilling through a lintel

Daz

LE
Many thanks for the responses on this. At the suggestion of @Daz I went and got a Titan SDS drill which went through the lintel very easily using only 40% of it's power.
View attachment 525405

Quite a bargain from Screwfix; 1500w hammer drill, 3m cable, conventional drill chuck and a number of sds drills/chisels, all for £60!

View attachment 525406

Much appreciated.

MM
Following my advice....that's not going to end well :)
 
Some advice please. I'm trying to put up some curtain poles at a relative's house which is a 1990s bungalow.

Having done the same at my place recently I was surprised that my decent, but domestic spec Bosch hammer drill would not penetrate beyond the plasterwork of the bungalow's walls. Upon inspection it seems that I am trying to drill into the lintel which is concrete rather than brick, which my lintels are constructed of.

Doing some research it seems I need something called an SDS drill. This I understand offers more power and a chisel action. My question are:

Whether I can use ordinary drill bits or do I need specific SDS drill bits?

Is there a minimum amount of watts power I should be looking for?

I have seen a few SDS drills on Facebook Market place, but these seem to be rated at 110v and have a non-standard plug fitted (see below) Presumably these are no good for plugging into a domestic electricity supply?

View attachment 524527View attachment 524528

Many thanks.

MM
This may help.

 
Many thanks for the responses on this. At the suggestion of @Daz I went and got a Titan SDS drill which went through the lintel very easily using only 40% of it's power.
View attachment 525405

Quite a bargain from Screwfix; 1500w hammer drill, 3m cable, conventional drill chuck and a number of sds drills/chisels, all for £60!

View attachment 525406

Much appreciated.

MM
Very similar to one I have that I bought for breaking out concrete. Absolutely adequate for drilling masonry and light breaking jobs.

Don't be tempted to use it to drill steel though as the chuck flops about in the SDS socket and you'll end up snapping the bits.

Also, if you're using the larger masonry bits, hold it firmly - if the bit jams, your wrist will disengage before the clutch does.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Many thanks for the responses on this. At the suggestion of @Daz I went and got a Titan SDS drill which went through the lintel very easily using only 40% of it's power.
View attachment 525405

Quite a bargain from Screwfix; 1500w hammer drill, 3m cable, conventional drill chuck and a number of sds drills/chisels, all for £60!

View attachment 525406

Much appreciated.

MM
they are not a bad bit of kit for the price
I bought one to keep on a job, where we were working on and off over 2 years, left it with a tray of fixings, so that other blokes who work alongside me could use it to fit signs, and pipe brackets, saved carting my 110v one around on me pushbike ( local job just outside town)
when we finished the job I gave it to a couple of lesbians who were doing some work free in the local church, they are renovating an old stone house, so it was ideal for them, unless they had other uses in mind !!
 
Last edited:

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
they are not a bad bit of kit for the price
I bought one to keep on a job, where we were working on and off over 2 years, left it with a tray of fixings, so that other blokes who work alongside me could use it to fit signs, and pipe brackets, saved carting my 110v one around on me pushbike ( local job just outside town)
when we finished the job I gave it to a couple of lesbians who were doing some work free in the local church, they are renovating an old stone house, so it was ideal for them, unless they had other uses in mind !!
Er any photos:???:

Strictly for that funny thread of course.
 

Daz

LE
the kindest thing I can say, is that they were not photogenic, it would really shatter all of your filthy perverted and depraved illusions about Lesbians ( and mine)
Are you sure about that?? this is arrse after all
 
they are not a bad bit of kit for the price
I bought one to keep on a job, where we were working on and off over 2 years, left it with a tray of fixings, so that other blokes who work alongside me could use it to fit signs, and pipe brackets, saved carting my 110v one around on me pushbike ( local job just outside town)
when we finished the job I gave it to a couple of lesbians who were doing some work free in the local church, they are renovating an old stone house, so it was ideal for them, unless they had other uses in mind !!
No photos?
 
Some advice please. I'm trying to put up some curtain poles at a relative's house which is a 1990s bungalow.

Having done the same at my place recently I was surprised that my decent, but domestic spec Bosch hammer drill would not penetrate beyond the plasterwork of the bungalow's walls. Upon inspection it seems that I am trying to drill into the lintel which is concrete rather than brick, which my lintels are constructed of.

Doing some research it seems I need something called an SDS drill. This I understand offers more power and a chisel action. My question are:

Whether I can use ordinary drill bits or do I need specific SDS drill bits?

Is there a minimum amount of watts power I should be looking for?

I have seen a few SDS drills on Facebook Market place, but these seem to be rated at 110v and have a non-standard plug fitted (see below) Presumably these are no good for plugging into a domestic electricity supply?

View attachment 524527View attachment 524528

Many thanks.

MM
Ive drill through marine concrete on a house boat with a special bit before, csrbide tip but the spiral thread is slightly different to normal masonry bits.

More of a grinder than a drill to be honest
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
Ive drill through marine concrete on a house boat with a special bit before, csrbide tip but the spiral thread is slightly different to normal masonry bits.

More of a grinder than a drill to be honest


Nice bits of kit

We had a large cast concrete sewer pipe on a job, and needed 110mm hole for a new drain to feed it, a very very expensive carbide cutter was purchased for the job, then before I could pick it up from the office a certain sly fat git liberated it for a cash job on some body else's site
I was pissed off as I had ordered it specially, plus hired in the special drill with clutch
Oh and the office was closed that weekend so I could work without the sewer being live
Ended up putting a curved sheet of timber inside the mahoosive vertical pipe, then drilling very very slowly with a new 5.5 mm sds bit no hammer though
Needledrilling it's called
I dragged it out all day. Then returned the next day to clear up dress the edges and set the pipe in with cement
There was a lot of complaining about my hours, and that I could have waited till the correct tool was returned
Tuesday morning g sewers working nice, new joint set and working
Fat arse turns up and tries to slide the cordless sds drill and bit into my workshop for collection
Told him to feck right off, he has signed for it he returns it
Just as well, he had dropped a brand spanker new hire drill, a grands worth in the poo poo
Buggered up, also the battery had come away from the body and gone down the drain, along with the expensive but which clicked out as he put his hand in the poo desperately trying to retrieve it
Hire company took one look a few pictures, and skipped it
Best bit was the mong had cracked the sewer pipe, 3 days work to dig it out and replace, plus check for blockages
Oh and they didn't pay him
I got my overtime though
 
We once had a client who engaged us to do 10x petrographic examinations on specific parts of large diameter concrete pipes. This involves core drilling a sample which is then subjected to microscopic examination in the laboratory by a geologist. Diamond coring pipes is a pain due to the curved surface.

As soon as we'd obtained the samples, the client phoned our office saying that the petros were no longer needed so we just billed him for the time on site - about £250 plus travel.

We found out later that the client had worked out that it was cheaper for him to have the holes drilled by a consultancy than by a contractor - and the holes were more precise and done with more care.

We changed our pricing policy after that.
 

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