Drill/Ceremonial Advice Sought

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I agree on the stamping, I have looked at LAS and they have some form of naval ish drill but dont focus too much on it. Its all food for thought.

Thanks
JC
I'm pretty sure my one bout of coffin carrying (1986. I've described it on here somewhere before but can't be arrsed to check), we managed to avoid stampy drill. But it was a long time ago, obviously.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Given that there isn’t really a precedent, why don’t you just make it up and do what you want?

I know the Fire Brigade do drill that is sort of based on Navy drill and the Police do Armyish drill with a really weird cack handed salute.

I’d just copy one of the other emergency services. Fire Brigade preferably as the whole stampy stampy shouty shit is a bit much for a civvy organisation in my opinion.
Just a bit of background old boy.

When I joined the Old Bill in 1990, we had drill lessons, proper old school drill, a lot of it, in proper army style, including saluting. Our drill instructor was a Police Sergeant whose only duties were administration, discipline and drill. He was an ex Genadier drill pig joining direct from Guards Depot. We even had a passing out parade that was no different from my army one 15 years earlier. I even borrowed a pair of ammo boots from a mate still serving in the Lifeguards.

About a year later, drill was stopped at the Police College in Ashford (where I attended) and from that point on we never had to salute superior officers.

During the miners strikes in the eighties, Police Officers debussed and marched in ranks before forming up in a shield line. When we debussed for the Poll Tax riots it was a messy shambles.

When you see Police Officers saluting now (unless they are ex army) it is made up, not taught and therefore looks a bit strange.
 
Just a bit of background old boy.

When I joined the Old Bill in 1990, we had drill lessons, proper old school drill, a lot of it, in proper army style, including saluting. Our drill instructor was a Police Sergeant whose only duties were administration, discipline and drill. He was an ex Genadier drill pig joining direct from Guards Depot. We even had a passing out parade that was no different from my army one 15 years earlier. I even borrowed a pair of ammo boots from a mate still serving in the Lifeguards.

About a year later, drill was stopped at the Police College in Ashford (where I attended) and from that point on we never had to salute superior officers.

During the miners strikes in the eighties, Police Officers debussed and marched in ranks before forming up in a shield line. When we debussed for the Poll Tax riots it was a messy shambles.

When you see Police Officers saluting now (unless they are ex army) it is made up, not taught and therefore looks a bit strange.
IIRC The Met tradition is shortest way up shortest way down with an inward palm.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
Did that not just result in synchronised pelvic thrusts from the coffin bearers? Not something you want to see at a funeral, really.


I'm not certain this would be considered respectful for a funeral

 

Sabretooth

War Hero
Afternoon everyone I have been away from Arrse for sometime. But I have always found the hive mind has some cracking ideas.

I work for an NHS Ambulance service and the trust is considering forming a ceremonial team for things such as remembrance day and funerals. I have contacted other services who already have this in place to see how they have done it but lets be honest the experts in ceremony are the army.

Are there any drill experts out there who would be willing to let me pick their brains?
If done it would be so those taking part can show off... The guy / guyess in the Box won't care ....
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Just a bit of background old boy.

When I joined the Old Bill in 1990, we had drill lessons, proper old school drill, a lot of it, in proper army style, including saluting. Our drill instructor was a Police Sergeant whose only duties were administration, discipline and drill. He was an ex Genadier drill pig joining direct from Guards Depot. We even had a passing out parade that was no different from my army one 15 years earlier. I even borrowed a pair of ammo boots from a mate still serving in the Lifeguards.

About a year later, drill was stopped at the Police College in Ashford (where I attended) and from that point on we never had to salute superior officers.

During the miners strikes in the eighties, Police Officers debussed and marched in ranks before forming up in a shield line. When we debussed for the Poll Tax riots it was a messy shambles.

When you see Police Officers saluting now (unless they are ex army) it is made up, not taught and therefore looks a bit strange.
Much the same here. I did my basic police training at Eynsham Hall in Oxon, and we had ex guards drill sgts. A fair bit of emphasis on the whole marching about and saluting bit. I was the only ex squaddie on my course so I was 'volunteered' to take extra drill lessons for those who were struglling. Naturally, being an ex drill pig myself, I taught the proper and correct drill, ie. Light drill.
As an aside, on my first few months at home police station we marched out to relieve the previous shift. That soon was stopped when wpcs joined the fray. Saluting was infrequent but as it was quite a casual place it was hardly noticed. We also had to learn how to do point duty and probationers did it every early turn for the first year.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
IIRC The Met tradition is shortest way up shortest way down with an inward palm.

I recall some HAC parade where the VIP was some senior Met plodder.

He did a shortest way up shortest way down RN style salute but his forearm was nearly vertical. It looked more like he was putting his arm up to cover his right eye than saluting.

It was definitely deliberate as it was such a distinctive and weird way of saluting. It wasn’t just a cack handed attempt at saluting the RN way.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Like this...
7807498E-56EA-408A-AD93-A5994B1684FC.jpeg
 
Why do my toes get a bit cringey curly at the thought of Ambulance and Paramedic staff doing some showy drill at a wreath-laying ceremony?

What would I know about drill, anyway, being RAF and tha' ?
 
Do avoid that mincing short step the Septics, laughably, consider to be a slow march.
Looks more like they’re walking with two hairs in their arrse tied together.
 
I’d go with Ravers’ idea. Just copy the Fire Service.
When I joined the cops in 1995 we still did drill at Warrington. Utter shambles, don’t bother following what the cops do. We had a ”drill” sergeant. In our squad of ~15 we had three ex-army and two ex-matelots. Apart from we three former squaddies, IIRC the only one who “got” any form of drill used to be an air hostess.
Surely, as a service, you just have to turn up smart. The ambulance service demonstrates its skill, dedication and commitment every day.
 
Given that there isn’t really a precedent, why don’t you just make it up and do what you want?

I know the Fire Brigade do drill that is sort of based on Navy drill and the Police do Armyish drill with a really weird cack handed salute.

I’d just copy one of the other emergency services. Fire Brigade preferably as the whole stampy stampy shouty shit is a bit much generally.

Fixed for you.
 

Dwarf

LE
Last edited:

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Given that there isn’t really a precedent, why don’t you just make it up and do what you want?

I know the Fire Brigade do drill that is sort of based on Navy drill and the Police do Armyish drill with a really weird cack handed salute.

I’d just copy one of the other emergency services. Fire Brigade preferably as the whole stampy stampy shouty shit is a bit much for a civvy organisation in my opinion.
You're not wrong there, matey. On Remembrance Sunday this year, the Borough Commander turned up with 10 of his minions (for crowd and traffic control), laid the wreath and then saluted with his left hand. He thought we'd missed it but one of his minions told him of the faux pas and how it had been pointed out to them by the bunch of old gits wearing medals.
 

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