Dremel/Proxxon for power carving?

37ucv67i

War Hero
Thanks for the input, everyone! I'll go and see what the local hardware shop recommends next week. They're a bit pricey and have silly opening hours, but going by what people have been saying on here, there's no point in buying a cheapish Dremel online only to have it going up in smoke a few weeks or months later.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
True and for model work on plastic/resin/cast metals/light woods it's a fine option.
My eldest son scrounged some cutting and grinding type doofers from our dentist when he was making Warhammer models in his teens that fit his B&Q Dremel equivalent.

For sculpting and carving I can't see a Dremel or equivalent lasting very long.
I can throughly recommend a trip to a dental website for a glance at the complete range of burs available.
There is a huge range of shapes and materials as well as different shanks on them.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I can throughly recommend a trip to a dental website for a glance at the complete range of burs available.
There is a huge range of shapes and materials as well as different shanks on them.
Any sites you'd recommend FF?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer

Tyk

LE
Many thanks, that's perfect.
The gubbins my lad scrounged off our dentist (old friend of mine and apparently quite a keen model maker) was really effective on the white metal and plastic Warhammer stuff he was working on. Thinking about it, the amount of clever development that goes into the tools that a dentist uses I'd guess they're way better than anything that Dremel would ever make.
 
I have a Dremel that I used making a doll house with furniture for a Goddaughter but I doubt if it would what you want. Here in the US I have seen a flexible shaft tool by the Boredom company but pricier than you suggested an no idea if they are available in the UK

Oops
Reposting, the tool I mentioned is made by the Foredom company

Sorry about pridetive text issue
 
I'm looking at getting into wood and stone power carving, nothing special and just for fun after work. It seems that Dremel and Proxxon are the main manufacturers for the appropriate multi-tools. Can anyone advise on what to take into account when deciding what to buy? Maximum price is 100 quid. Ideally the tool would be suitable for hard stones such as granite, but then we're probably moving into a different price range. Grateful for any useful hints and ideas.
Another one in the Dremel = no camp. They're fine for light work, but stone? You'll shag it in no time.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
For those interested in dental burs, a very quick over view.

We have three different types of handpiece and this is reflected in the shanks.
High speed are small smooth
Slow speed all slightly fatter and have a notch at the end for the latch grip on the handpiece but that won't affect a dremel
Straight are same diameter as slow but with a long shaft.


We then get different materials, but usually diamond, tungsten carbide or stainless steel.

Then the shape, there's multiple different shapes and sizes of those shapes. Straight, tapered, cone, inverted cone, rose head, round, rugby ball, wheels.

You can also get mandrels that hold varying degrees of polishing discs.

Small brushes and cups for polishing.

You can also get stones for polishing and smoothing, as well as rubber impregnated ones.

Drill bits for making pin and post channels of various diameters

At work most dentists will easily have at least one drawer full of them!
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
For those interested in dental burs, a very quick over view.

We have three different types of handpiece and this is reflected in the shanks.
High speed are small smooth
Slow speed all slightly fatter and have a notch at the end for the latch grip on the handpiece but that won't affect a dremel
Straight are same diameter as slow but with a long shaft.


We then get different materials, but usually diamond, tungsten carbide or stainless steel.

Then the shape, there's multiple different shapes and sizes of those shapes. Straight, tapered, cone, inverted cone, rose head, round, rugby ball, wheels.

You can also get mandrels that hold varying degrees of polishing discs.

Small brushes and cups for polishing.

You can also get stones for polishing and smoothing, as well as rubber impregnated ones.

Drill bits for making pin and post channels of various diameters

At work most dentists will easily have at least one drawer full of them!
Again invaluable stuff mind if I put this and the link earlier over in the model bit?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Sa
For those interested in dental burs, a very quick over view.

We have three different types of handpiece and this is reflected in the shanks.
High speed are small smooth
Slow speed all slightly fatter and have a notch at the end for the latch grip on the handpiece but that won't affect a dremel
Straight are same diameter as slow but with a long shaft.


We then get different materials, but usually diamond, tungsten carbide or stainless steel.

Then the shape, there's multiple different shapes and sizes of those shapes. Straight, tapered, cone, inverted cone, rose head, round, rugby ball, wheels.

You can also get mandrels that hold varying degrees of polishing discs.

Small brushes and cups for polishing.

You can also get stones for polishing and smoothing, as well as rubber impregnated ones.

Drill bits for making pin and post channels of various diameters

At work most dentists will easily have at least one drawer full of them!
Said Dr. Szell innocently.
 
I got given a cheap mini tool, it has the flexible drive and a plastic stand to hold it in. it works better than the dremel that I've left in a drawer. the flixible drive is the best part
 

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