Dremel/Proxxon for power carving?

37ucv67i

War Hero
I'm looking at getting into wood and stone power carving, nothing special and just for fun after work. It seems that Dremel and Proxxon are the main manufacturers for the appropriate multi-tools. Can anyone advise on what to take into account when deciding what to buy? Maximum price is 100 quid. Ideally the tool would be suitable for hard stones such as granite, but then we're probably moving into a different price range. Grateful for any useful hints and ideas.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Dremel while good for light work I suspect might not be up to the task.
 

Slime

LE
Dremel is a very clever brand imho, they sell tools that are fairly poor, and very much DIY level tools, but at entry level professional tool prices.

I have a Dremel 4000 model, it’s very much a tool only suited to very light work.

For heavier work something like a pillar drill, or drill in a drill press/clamp with a flexible extension shaft might be a better option. A pillar drill would also be a lot quieter than a hand held rotary tool.

Anything has to be better than a Dremel with their desire to rapidly become very very hot to hold :)
 
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Dremel while good for light work I suspect might not be up to the task.
I've burned two sets of brushes out of my Dremel, great for intricate light work occasionally, prolonged heavier use doesn't stand the test.
 

Slime

LE
I've burned two sets of brushes out of my Dremel, great for intricate light work occasionally, prolonged heavier use doesn't stand the test.
I‘ve burned the thermal fuse on mine.
I can’t help feeling the fact they use a non resetting thermal device is part of getting owners to buy a new tool when the old one stops working.

I just buy a new fuse for a tenner, but it’s still something annoying, and not the kind of issue I ever get with my Makita or DeWalt tools.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Dremel is a very clever brand imho, they sell tools that are fairly poor, and very much DIY level tools, but at entry level professional tool prices.

I have a Dremel 4000 model, it’s very much a tool only suited to very light work.

For heavier work something like a pillar drill, or drill in a drill press/clamp with a flexible extension shaft might be a better option. A pillar drill would also be a lot quieter than a hand held rotary tool.

Anything has to be better than a Dremel with their desire to rapidly become very very hit to hold :)
In fairness I use it for modelling work and it's excellent for that, but for anything heavier like I say I can see it being poor
 
I bought a 'Performance Power' (B&Q own brand?) Dremel type tool some years ago...

Quite clearly it is a tool that may be unsafe to casual visitors to you home as in the user manual it says,

"Do not let visitors touch this tool or extension cord. Visitors must be must be kept away from the work area".

How many visitors just turn up and ask if they can touch your tool eh?

It is still functional after many years but attaching the flexible extension to its chuck is no longer possible. When it eventually dies I will have a new one that doesn't mind if visitors want to touch my tool.
 

Oyibo

LE
I owned both over the years and Proxxon quality is waaaay better, but you pay for it.
My opinion is that Proxxon is better for intensive but not too varied work, while Dremel has a lot more flexibility for work due to the vast array of optional extras.
 

Slime

LE
I bought a 'Performance Power' (B&Q own brand?) Dremel type tool some years ago...

Quite clearly it is a tool that may be unsafe to casual visitors to you home as in the user manual it says,

"Do not let visitors touch this tool or extension cord. Visitors must be must be kept away from the work area".

How many visitors just turn up and ask if they can touch your tool eh?

It is still functional after many years but attaching the flexible extension to its chuck is no longer possible. When it eventually dies I will have a new one that doesn't mind if visitors want to touch my tool.
I've heard loads of people sing the praises of the B and Q tool as compared to the Dremel.

They say exactly what you did, that the tool goes on for years.
 
I'm looking at getting into wood and stone power carving, nothing special and just for fun after work. It seems that Dremel and Proxxon are the main manufacturers for the appropriate multi-tools. Can anyone advise on what to take into account when deciding what to buy? Maximum price is 100 quid. Ideally the tool would be suitable for hard stones such as granite, but then we're probably moving into a different price range. Grateful for any useful hints and ideas.
I've got a dremel, it's under powered for what your thinking of. It would be ok for polishing but not much else.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Dremels work just fine on dentures
 
I have a Dremel that I used making a doll house with furniture for a Goddaughter but I doubt if it would what you want. Here in the US I have seen a flexible shaft tool by the Boredom company but pricier than you suggested an no idea if they are available in the UK
 

Tyk

LE
If you're planning to carve wood and stone then the likes of a Dremel simply aren't up to the task. Something along the lines of :-



There are loads of different types available at tiny prices compared to even an own brand Dremel type tool.

You won't burn out the tiny motor you get in the likes of a Dremel and you can buy any sort of rotary cutting/grinding/polishing bits that don't rely on the likes of Dremel with their higher than rational prices.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
If you're planning to carve wood and stone then the likes of a Dremel simply aren't up to the task. Something along the lines of :-



There are loads of different types available at tiny prices compared to even an own brand Dremel type tool.

You won't burn out the tiny motor you get in the likes of a Dremel and you can buy any sort of rotary cutting/grinding/polishing bits that don't rely on the likes of Dremel with their higher than rational prices.
You can get loads of aftermarket stuff that fits a Dremel that isn't anywhere near as eye wateringly priced, most of it is just as good too. Just avoid the really cheap stuff.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
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Tyk

LE
You can get loads of aftermarket stuff that fits a Dremel that isn't anywhere near as eye wateringly priced, most of it is just as good too. Just avoid the really cheap stuff.
True and for model work on plastic/resin/cast metals/light woods it's a fine option.
My eldest son scrounged some cutting and grinding type doofers from our dentist when he was making Warhammer models in his teens that fit his B&Q Dremel equivalent.

For sculpting and carving I can't see a Dremel or equivalent lasting very long.
 

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