Double war grave photo

#61
I spend a bit of time on the Somme most years and I am always intrigued by the epitaphs etc. engraved on the headstones, some of which are very moving.

In Dartmoor cemetery near Fricourt lie a father and son from the same battery who were buried together (killed on the same day).

They are buried near to the oldest military casualty on the Somme (whole war I believe), Henry Webber.

Dartmoor Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt
 
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#62
There are french cemetaries around Verdun as well as the famous ossuary. I have seen others in France too. They are nothing like our lovely, well kept CWG ones though.

Generally though, they were far to busy retreating to bury their dead and the victors following just dumped them in mass graves like the Retreat From Moscow :)
For some reason, in WW1, many French military dead were returned to their home town for burial. I have seen in many French civilian cemeteries numbers of military graves, usually marked with an ornate black metal cross and a small plaque giving details. Obviously, when there were major battles with thousands of casualties, the graves registration people were swamped with bodies and could not arrange transport for so many.
 

ugly

LE
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#63
You may find that most buried at home died of wounds later. Plenty of French troops buried in Belgium
 
#64
Not at all, multiple graves aren't a common German thing unless unidentifiable. often you would get two names on a headstone from WW2 but not from WW1. The German equivalent of the war graves commission is on good terms with French Govts and always has been. They did usually have to purchase plots for post war burials but most of the cemeteries in Europe were given freely by the host nations whether advertised or not. The 2 names thing is a cost saver often, multiple or mass graves occurred usually when after action there would be a lot to bury, the reason so many remain in mass graves in the former Soviet Union is that there was very little access to defeated nations to rebury their dead after the war.
This is why we will still find mass graves like the Australian one in France for quite a few years to come. In Russia there are so many but the country is so big as to rarely inconvenience builders.


I'm talking purely from the Normandy perspective Uggs.

It's extremely common here.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#65
I'm talking purely from the Normandy perspective Uggs.

It's extremely common here.
Lots of crispy cynthias in Normandy. We delivered such amazing death from above I'm frankly surprised any were identifiable. I read that German corpses were the last to be removed from the battlefield by the Allies.
 
#66
We have a 1ww grave with two names in the port, the name he served under and his real name, if you are on face ache it will be on potp or Ellesmere Port memories
 

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#67
Lots of crispy cynthias in Normandy. We delivered such amazing death from above I'm frankly surprised any were identifiable. I read that German corpses were the last to be removed from the battlefield by the Allies.

I have heard that one before, you can understand it.

Another one I heard was that at French insistence oaks were planted so the graves in the German cemeteries would forever be in the twilight. I think it was probably more the French guy's own fanciful tale who I got that from, but it was one I'd never heard before.
 

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