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Double tap?

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
While watching a vid on youtube some time back of a unit conducting live firing, i realised that the shooting was all in double taps. I couldnt tell if it was one person doing it, or everyone was shooting double taps as SOP.
Anyway it then got me wondering; just how useful are double taps? If you fire two shots per target, you effectivly halve the number of targets you can engage with one mag.
On the other hand, if someone is worth shooting once, you may as well shoot them again?

Discuss?
 
Z

Zarathustra

Guest
#2
I was taught to double tap while doing snap shooting, the reason i was given was that the snap shooting was to prepare us for some seriously close quater shooting (if it came to it, it never did luckily).

Not as in a FIBUA type fight but more an ambush in a built up area/close country where targets will be under 100m away when they appear.

Hope that makes sense, i know what i mean but im not very good with words, which has left me in this delicate conundrum.
 
#3
double taps i.e two rounds heading towards the target almost at the same time have, i'm told four times the kinetic energy and will create a greater shock wave infront of the rounds, therefore greater hit power overall to the water volume of the body.
I'm no longer allowed to instruct double taps or sense of direction shooting as the law demands we justify and evaluate each round fired..
there you go. hope that helps
 
#5
No Wah

Depends what your classing as double taps.

I'll take a stab at this.

"Them" double tap in close quaters to ensure that they hit the target as it appears very quickly at very close quaters and the likelyhood of hitting with one shot is reduced.

Infantry are taught to fire two shots as a reaction to enemy fire, i.e two rounds in the general direction as a spoiler, dash, down, observe, sights, fire or RTR as it is now.
 
#6
I find that double taps don't give the same temperature control as a classic mixer, but that is only my opinion and I'm not a qualified plumber.
 
#7
rebel_with_a_cause said:
I find that double taps don't give the same temperature control as a classic mixer, but that is only my opinion and I'm not a qualified plumber.
brill :D
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
I'm assuming it's to get the target to fall down and stay that way as both rounds will not hit in the same place, thus causing more damage.
 
#9
My last two rounds fired in anger were double taps... Both Missed!!! :D

However this had the desired effect as my new best mate quickly raised hands and did as he was told.

Morale to this story.
If you hit them once... Great
If you hit them twice... Even better
If you just miss them... They get the message

Its something i'd always encourage!
 
#10
I thought it was just an indication that the springs on the SMG were getting a bit tired.
 
#12
Lewis said:
I thought people did double taps because of the 5.56 round.
I believe the double tap was brought about by the regiment because 9mm doesn't have enough stopping power when compared to a .45. Thr regiment didn't always have the funding and freedom of choice of weapons that it enjoys now. Don't know why we still use 9mm and havn't gone to .45, old habbits die hard I supppose.
I believe they almost adoptyed the FN Five Seven, now that is an interesting pistol!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FN_Five-seveN
 

B_AND_T

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
Double tap is when you kill them with the first shot and then kill them again. It saves suprises.
 
#14
FNUSNU said:
Lewis said:
I thought people did double taps because of the 5.56 round.
I believe the double tap was brought about by the regiment because 9mm doesn't have enough stopping power when compared to a .45. Thr regiment didn't always have the funding and freedom of choice of weapons that it enjoys now. Don't know why we still use 9mm and havn't gone to .45, old habbits die hard I supppose.
I believe they almost adoptyed the FN Five Seven, now that is an interesting pistol!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FN_Five-seveN
They certainly stopped those buggers in the Embassy!! I thought nowadays they could just ask for something and get it.Would of thought they would of had the Five Seven for a while ,the round is differnt for a pistol.
 
#15
Triple tap when I went to school (mid-eighties) - two in quick succession to the body to slow him down and get his attention, third to the head.

A useful practice to conduct with SA80 if you have the time and ammunition is the automatic fire assessment. All practices are conducted with the change lever on automatic. A good lesson in weapon and trigger control.
 
#16
The US teach this as standard response in a CQB situation and it is starting to creep into the mainstream over here. Supposedly there is only a 90-95% chance of instant incapacitation if a target is hit with one round to the torso, however that figure rises to over 99% if two rounds in quick succession smash into the enemy. Hence either use a contolled pair, rapid pair or "failure drill" if they dont work (not wanting to go into uber amounts of detail here obviously). There is an official CQB marksmanship programme in development, not sure how far along it is or whther SASC are too happy at the moment.
 
#17
I believe the double tap was brought about by the regiment because 9mm doesn't have enough stopping power when compared to a .45. Thr regiment didn't always have the funding and freedom of choice of weapons that it enjoys now. Don't know why we still use 9mm and havn't gone to .45, old habbits die hard I supppose.
I believe they almost adoptyed the FN Five Seven, now that is an interesting pistol!
It was invented by Fairbairn and Sykes, IIRC, before THEY existed. Don't think it has anything to do with the efficacy of .45 over 9mm, because while .45 is slightly better than 9mm (because it leaves a bigger hole), it's only slightly better, and not the ultimate man-killer the Yanks think it is.

When you look at the average 9mm pistol versus .45, you're talking roughly twice the mag capacity (e.g. 13/15 round capacity of the Browning against the 7 round capacity of the M1911), so not only do you have more loaded, you can carry more rounds for the same/less weight (similar to the 5.56mm versus 7.62mm comparison there, I s'pose).

Dunno how it came about exactly though. Could certainly have been the perceived efficacy of .45 over 9mm, increased 9mm capacity, need for a quick reliable technique for dropping targets at close range, enahnced terminal effect. Pick one, orcome up with your own.

*puts slippers back on and nods off*
 
#18
dutybooty said:
The US teach this as standard response in a CQB situation and it is starting to creep into the mainstream over here. Supposedly there is only a 90-95% chance of instant incapacitation if a target is hit with one round to the torso, however that figure rises to over 99% if two rounds in quick succession smash into the enemy. Hence either use a contolled pair, rapid pair or "failure drill" if they dont work (not wanting to go into uber amounts of detail here obviously). There is an official CQB marksmanship programme in development, not sure how far along it is or whther SASC are too happy at the moment.
I'm by no means John Rambo. However my experience in this area is that this old 5.56mm leaving them standing thing is toilet (IN MY EXPERIENCE). I've found that folk drop like a sack of sh1t and proceed to make lots of loud noises.

I'd be happy to be corrected by somebody who has seen someone just have it and walk on by however I've never seen this.

Its fairly reasonable to expect that a limb strike might leave one able to function but being spanked in the chest by something travelling 900 and odd metres per second... Ouch! Thats gonna be the worst winding of your life!

Getting shot hurts. Getting shot twice hurts twice as much... and so on.
 
#19
Closet_Jibber said:
dutybooty said:
The US teach this as standard response in a CQB situation and it is starting to creep into the mainstream over here. Supposedly there is only a 90-95% chance of instant incapacitation if a target is hit with one round to the torso, however that figure rises to over 99% if two rounds in quick succession smash into the enemy. Hence either use a contolled pair, rapid pair or "failure drill" if they dont work (not wanting to go into uber amounts of detail here obviously). There is an official CQB marksmanship programme in development, not sure how far along it is or whther SASC are too happy at the moment.
I'm by no means John Rambo. However my experience in this area is that this old 5.56mm leaving them standing thing is toilet (IN MY EXPERIENCE).

I'd be happy to be corrected by somebody who has seen someone just have it and walk on by.

Getting shot hurts. Getting shot twice hurts twice as much... and so on.
You my dear chap, have never played 'Counter Strike Source'
 
#20
:D

I'll be sure to give it a go and see if I can learn a thing or two.
 

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