Dosimeter principle

The current situation regarding con-19 testing seems to hark back to the Coldwar British Army way of doing things by letting people being used as cannon fodder (especially NHS staff in the present situation). We had our dosimeter which registered rads and could only be read by local commanders, and in the reality of the situation was that if you reached the Sell by Date you were expendable (That Reality was acknowledged and was not hidden from the wearer!)
It seems calculated that people with POSITION are being tested, while the front-line are left to fend for themselves (and potentialy being super-spreaders!).
The reality of this situation is not beyond my grasp, but can we not in this day and age have transparency?

Reality= If NHS staff are tested the majority are probably going to be quarantined therefore hindering the ability to cope!
Bratty

See below

 

aardvark64

Old-Salt
On another thread, someone pointed out that three months ago there were no testing kits at all. This was because there was no threat of pandemic from the virus at that point.

Personally, given how slowly our bureaucracy tends to operate, I'm impressed that it only took three months to build up stocks of these things and get them deployed...

ETA: hypo from fat fginers
 
From an employment point of view (though family is very different), is there really a point in testing front-line workers?

If severely affected they won't be able to turn up for work. If mildly affected, they may be able to work. All the while, their patients will already have Covid so there's no worry about transmission.

Where testing could be important is for personnel dealing with non-virus patients (e.g. paramedics) or if the NHS quarantines staff to bring them in gradually to avoid all the staff isolating at the same time.

Sounds harsh but the more important test is the one that says you've had the virus (and can crack on without the risk of affecting others) rather than the one that confirms that you've got it.
 
From an employment point of view (though family is very different), is there really a point in testing front-line workers?

If severely affected they won't be able to turn up for work. If mildly affected, they may be able to work. All the while, their patients will already have Covid so there's no worry about transmission.

Where testing could be important is for personnel dealing with non-virus patients (e.g. paramedics) or if the NHS quarantines staff to bring them in gradually to avoid all the staff isolating at the same time.

Sounds harsh but the more important test is the one that says you've had the virus rather than the one that confirms that you've got it.
interesting that NHS Scotland has now set up 'COVID-19 only' clinics to try to avoid cross-contamination.
 
I like the cold War analogy, tried explaining to friends about ground zero, red, Amber and green survival zones spreading elliptically by the winds. Amber and green survival was critical upon no population movement due to demand upon existing resources. That was a 2D model, now we have to think in 3D where all planet earth is ground zero and the red group are the 70+ or vulnerables, the Amber's then the greens furthest/highest from GZ, where the greens are u. 20's, hermits and so on. Again, lack of movement is critical but, instead of water, food and shelter, the resource is health care alone , dimished by inadvertent or careless infection caused entirely by population movement.
This model works better in a pub using pints and bar mats. Wait. Out.
 

964ST

Crow
Welcome back Bratty.

Is the thread going the way you hoped?
Thanks.

I have two sisters that work for the NHS as nurses in the UK, and after talking to them there is a genuine worry (not for themselves) that the potential to be passing on the virus unintentially to vulnerable groups ie. cancer patients, pregnant Women, etc. They take precautions but if decontamination is not carried out by everyone to the same level then there is a very high likelihood that eventually a breach will occur.
As pointed out in a previous reply, there seems to be a reaction that testing will be available to NHS staff (I do not have UK television for news updates) so it’s nice to be informed of the latest state of affairs by Arrse Members, so my hopes have been fulfilled.
 
Thanks.

I have two sisters that work for the NHS as nurses in the UK, and after talking to them there is a genuine worry (not for themselves) that the potential to be passing on the virus unintentially to vulnerable groups ie. cancer patients, pregnant Women, etc. They take precautions but if decontamination is not carried out by everyone to the same level then there is a very high likelihood that eventually a breach will occur.
As pointed out in a previous reply, there seems to be a reaction that testing will be available to NHS staff (I do not have UK television for news updates) so it’s nice to be informed of the latest state of affairs by Arrse Members, so my hopes have been fulfilled.
You really have been away for a while haven't you?

Nonetheless I'm glad you have got what you needed.
 
Thanks.

I have two sisters that work for the NHS as nurses in the UK, and after talking to them there is a genuine worry (not for themselves) that the potential to be passing on the virus unintentially to vulnerable groups ie. cancer patients, pregnant Women, etc. They take precautions but if decontamination is not carried out by everyone to the same level then there is a very high likelihood that eventually a breach will occur.
As pointed out in a previous reply, there seems to be a reaction that testing will be available to NHS staff (I do not have UK television for news updates) so it’s nice to be informed of the latest state of affairs by Arrse Members, so my hopes have been fulfilled.
And that has what to do with your batsh*t recollection of NBC drills?
 

5645andym

Clanker
The catch with testing of course is that a test is only good for the time it was taken - if your Medic then has contact with one single person they may well be infected without knowing it . . .
 
My watch is radioactive !!
am I going to die ?
// As a brand new baby submariner (but old and bold sailor) I thought that when the 'Doc' asked me for my watch to check for radiation, he was joking.

But no!

Boats have radiation detectors around the bazaars - funnily enough. If you have, for example, your Dad's old watch with the huge pale yellow 'luminous lumps' it is just possible that it emits enough radiation to cause an alert on the detector, which could cause all manner of fun and games!

Everyday's a school-day!

// Carry on!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
From an employment point of view (though family is very different), is there really a point in testing front-line workers?

If severely affected they won't be able to turn up for work. If mildly affected, they may be able to work. All the while, their patients will already have Covid so there's no worry about transmission.

Where testing could be important is for personnel dealing with non-virus patients (e.g. paramedics) or if the NHS quarantines staff to bring them in gradually to avoid all the staff isolating at the same time.

Sounds harsh but the more important test is the one that says you've had the virus (and can crack on without the risk of affecting others) rather than the one that confirms that you've got it.
It's about virus load, the amount of virus in somebody whether it be patient or staff.

You don't want to give yet more virus to an already ill patient.

Nor do you want to give an infected staff member even more virus.

If you look, there are multiple examples of previously fit health care workers who have succumbed to Covid19. Often those who have been repeatedly exposed to large aerosols when intubating
 
Sooner the NHS are tested the better, might make the supermarkets safer. Best Windsor Davies accent.... "because they might have the lurgy".

Signed:
A selfish cnut.
 
A test is only as good at the time it is taken.
So, someone takes test 0900.
Is exposed to virus 0905.
Test comes back clear.
Meanwhile, subject is merrily incubating, and may not show symptoms for a week or two later.
The key isn't IF you test staff.
It is how OFTEN you test.
That means you either need a test with a very short turnaround, and ideally not requiring lab work, or you only test to verify when someone shows symptoms.

Since this is a new threat, testing has had to be developed on the fly, from little information, from scratch.
 
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