Dont want a job? Get yourself up the duff!

#1
BBC

Teenagers 'choosing motherhood'

Many teenage girls see having a baby as a better option than a low-paid "dead-end" job, research has found.
The study, for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation suggested girls as young as 13 choose motherhood to be independent and to create "a loving family".

The researchers said their findings show teenagers are not ignorant about contraception, as is often assumed, and actively plan to have a baby.

The UK's teen pregnancy rate, the highest in Western Europe, is falling.

The research, carried out by the Trust for the Study of Adolescence, was based on interviews with 51 young mothers and fathers aged 13-22 living in six deprived areas of England.

Areas of deprivation and poverty have the highest rates of teenage pregnancy.

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation said the government had made cutting teenage conception rates a priority - but has focused on unplanned, accidental teenage pregnancies and not considered those who 'plan' their pregnancies.

The study found that many of those who became pregnant as teenagers had wanted to compensate for their own bad experiences as childhood.

They said that if they had not become a parent, their life would become worse because of continued family disruption and unhappiness.

In many cases, teenagers understood how contraception worked but did not know that their age group had a high fertility rate.

Information 'key'

Many girls talked about their love for babies. One 18-year-old said: "Everybody said I'd make a good mum. I knew exactly what I was doing when I got pregnant."

Young men often mentioned wanting to provide a "father-figure" for a child - contrary to their experience.

But they were much more likely to regret their decision later.

Suzanne Cater, who wrote the report, said: "Highlighting the fact that not all teenage pregnancies are unplanned will help address support needs currently not being met.

"Using teenagers who wish they had delayed parenthood could also help inform young people who may have potentially unrealistic expectations of parenthood."

But Gill Frances, chairwoman of the Independent Advisory Group on Teenage Pregnancy - set up to advise the government on its teenage pregnancy strategy - said: "It is important to recognise that most young women, with the right support, make good mums. That is not the issue.

"The issue is that if they had waited a bit longer they would have got settled and become much more independent."

She said it was important to give young people information about sexual heath and contraceptive services.

'An unfortunate study'

Anne Weyman, chief executive of the Family Planning Association (fpa) said: "Young women living in poverty have very few choices and chances in life.

"The combined effect of a poor education, periods on benefit, social isolation and few employment opportunities mean that teenage mums experience significant disadvantage compared to those who have children later in life.

"It's vital that teenagers of both sexes are provided with real alternatives to early parenthood."

But Beverley Hughes, minister for children, families and young people said: "This is an unfortunate study which, on the basis of a very small and carefully selected sample, suggests that teenage pregnancy can be a positive option for some young people. We reject that view completely.

"There is overwhelming evidence that, overall, teenage parenthood leads to poorer outcomes both for teenage mothers and their children.

"Our Teenage Pregnancy Strategy focuses on preventing teenage pregnancies and since its introduction conception rates for under-18s have fallen to their lowest level in 20 years."
Obviously not a plan I can use, but is this something to be discouraged? It sounds really stupid, but surely their kids will have a better life born into a family (or mother at least), that wants them and wants to look after them and as the report said "as teenagers had wanted to compensate for their own bad experiences as childhood. Although doing that off state benefits (in areas of social deprivation) isn't exactly desirable... Opinions?
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
The question should be asked if this was a viable career choice for their mothers 16-20 years ago, in which case it demonstrates that its not a viable option to create a "loving home." If they've not got that from their mother what makes them capable of giving the same to their own child.

And how much is the statement "you'd make a great mum" a euphemism for "you're effing useless at anything else?"
 
#4
So in areas of social deprivation where children have had bad experiences through childhood they expect to be able to compensate for that by having their own kids at an early age!

What a complete load of balls! Their bad experiences were probably caused by being born into a low income family which was breaking down or already broken down when they were born. How can they do better than that when they get themselves up the duff, expecting a council flat and benefits. They have no long term plan for income and the chances of a teenage lad hanging around to be the "father figure" is probably limited to sharing their action men or teaching the kid how to play Grand Theft Auto. Instead they could stop moaning about their own circumstances and work hard at school, get a job comensurate with their ability, find a good man, get married (I know it's a dirty word but it's the best option), own/rent a house, ensure they have a stable environment to bring children up in, plan to have a child, have child, get on with life having made sensible provisions and considered all of the pro's and con's - something I struggle to believe a teenage girl (or boy) are capable of doing!
 
#5
spuncan said:
Get married, have a stable income first. Might well take a few years to obtain that, which isn't a bad thing.
Or have baby, Get free housing, Income support and Child benifit for doing nothing?

Case in the paper of un-married couple with 9 kids getting £38,000 a year in total benifits! Then not bothering to hand over £120 per week housing benifit to landlord. Are they evicted? NO

Another case of couple with 10 kids in 2 council houses knocked together on £32,000 a year who never cleaned the house - Council ended up doing it for them!

How much would you or I have to earn before Tax & Insurance to get that kind of money? About £55,000 I would think...
 
#6
Horridlittleman said:
So in areas of social deprivation where children have had bad experiences through childhood they expect to be able to compensate for that by having their own kids at an early age!

What a complete load of balls! Their bad experiences were probably caused by being born into a low income family which was breaking down or already broken down when they were born. How can they do better than that when they get themselves up the duff, expecting a council flat and benefits. They have no long term plan for income and the chances of a teenage lad hanging around to be the "father figure" is probably limited to sharing their action men or teaching the kid how to play Grand Theft Auto. Instead they could stop moaning about their own circumstances and work hard at school, get a job comensurate with their ability, find a good man, get married (I know it's a dirty word but it's the best option), own/rent a house, ensure they have a stable environment to bring children up in, plan to have a child, have child, get on with life having made sensible provisions and considered all of the pro's and con's - something I struggle to believe a teenage girl (or boy) are capable of doing!
I reckon you would have lost them at the first sentence :lol:
 
#7
Andyroo said:
Horridlittleman said:
So in areas of social deprivation where children have had bad experiences through childhood they expect to be able to compensate for that by having their own kids at an early age!

What a complete load of balls! Their bad experiences were probably caused by being born into a low income family which was breaking down or already broken down when they were born. How can they do better than that when they get themselves up the duff, expecting a council flat and benefits. They have no long term plan for income and the chances of a teenage lad hanging around to be the "father figure" is probably limited to sharing their action men or teaching the kid how to play Grand Theft Auto. Instead they could stop moaning about their own circumstances and work hard at school, get a job comensurate with their ability, find a good man, get married (I know it's a dirty word but it's the best option), own/rent a house, ensure they have a stable environment to bring children up in, plan to have a child, have child, get on with life having made sensible provisions and considered all of the pro's and con's - something I struggle to believe a teenage girl (or boy) are capable of doing!
I reckon you would have lost them at the first sentence :lol:
If they bothered to learn to read, instead of trying to justify being a teenage tart by calling it a viable career choice then they might be able to grasp the point! :D
 
#8
I'm a man and as such can't get pregnant and don't have access to this 'career path'.

Who do I have to scream 'Human rights!' at, to get this changed? :roll:
 
#9
I recall asking a young Geordie girl in Bosnia during the 90's why she had joined. Her reply was 'It was either this or get pregnant'
Some youngsters just can't see a way out of their current situation.
 
#10
Horridlittleman said:
Andyroo said:
Horridlittleman said:
So in areas of social deprivation where children have had bad experiences through childhood they expect to be able to compensate for that by having their own kids at an early age!

What a complete load of balls! Their bad experiences were probably caused by being born into a low income family which was breaking down or already broken down when they were born. How can they do better than that when they get themselves up the duff, expecting a council flat and benefits. They have no long term plan for income and the chances of a teenage lad hanging around to be the "father figure" is probably limited to sharing their action men or teaching the kid how to play Grand Theft Auto. Instead they could stop moaning about their own circumstances and work hard at school, get a job comensurate with their ability, find a good man, get married (I know it's a dirty word but it's the best option), own/rent a house, ensure they have a stable environment to bring children up in, plan to have a child, have child, get on with life having made sensible provisions and considered all of the pro's and con's - something I struggle to believe a teenage girl (or boy) are capable of doing!
I reckon you would have lost them at the first sentence :lol:
If they bothered to learn to read, instead of trying to justify being a teenage tart by calling it a viable career choice then they might be able to grasp the point! :D


Yeah but no but........
 
#11
Don't want a job?

Get yourself up the duff!

Or join the Civil Service!

:lol: :lol:
 
#12
Good article; very bleak. I live on the edge of an 'area of social deprivation' and the amount of teen mums is horrifying. They're brought up to believe that having a kid is the best thing as they will get benefits & house - who needs education or a job when you can get rid by a local 'hood & have a baby? When you have grannies in their 30's, you know it's a perpetual cycle.
 
#13
The study found that many of those who became pregnant as teenagers had wanted to compensate for their own bad experiences as childhood.

They said that if they had not become a parent, their life would become worse because of continued family disruption and unhappiness.
And the cycle continues............
 
#14
Ah the pot noodle family

Just add Matelot/Pongo/Crab wage packet!
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#15
Just get yourself around quite a few parts of Tyneside and you'll see loads of them. All pushing prams, smerkin' tabs and looking forward to thier next unprotected sexual encounter with a close relative who is also thier 'benefits' advisor.
 
#17
It's sad, but in a lot of areas it's almost the only way a single person can get council accomodation.

At one point the wait could be over 18 years if you didn't have any extenuating circumstances (i.e. had kids). My brother got divorced over two years ago, has his kids every second week, and has only just got a house. His ex got one straight away!
 
#18
The problem is that those who really would be good parents, are delaying it, having smaller families or none at all. Meanwhile, the Chavs are breeding like rabbits, so soon the whole country will be overflowing with the little burberry wearing idiots. If this carries on, who will be left to pay their dole money?

Maybe eugenics isn't such a bad idea...
 
#19
Being from an estate full of teenage mothers etc, the view seemed to be that you left school, worked (haha) if you could find a job then jack it in because it was easier staying at home and having kid after kid. It was a kind of aspiration really for some of the girls I knew. Ask them to do GCSE Maths and you would get a blank look.... ask them to work out what they get in benefits and it would make Stephen Hawkings look stupid.
 
#20
stabandswat said:
Being from an estate full of teenage mothers etc, the view seemed to be that you left school, worked (haha) if you could find a job then jack it in because it was easier staying at home and having kid after kid. It was a kind of aspiration really for some of the girls I knew. Ask them to do GCSE Maths and you would get a blank look.... ask them to work out what they get in benefits and it would make Stephen Hawkings look stupid.
What utter cobblers

Two stories from my family.

My sister was pregnant at 15, got a council house at 16 1/2. Now, under Your theory she would be there still, popping out toddlers from a variety of wasters. But no. She went to college, became a bloody good chef and then over several years became the director of a company and started another. It wasn't until my second nephew who has Downes Syndrome needed all of her attention that she fell back on the state.

My cousin fell pregnant at 16, had two kids to a waster before marrying him and having a third. She has worked throughout her life (divorced him because he didn't) always finding clerical work in a city that was destroyed by Thatchers excesses.

If my family followed Your dictat then my cousins kids would have carried on the motion. Not at all, one has just completed a degree and is considering a masters, the second is in a long term relationship with a lad who has been in work throughout and with both of them there are no kids anywhere on the horizon.

I am not saying that they are the average kids from sink estates, far from it - but I AM denying the seemingly prevelant opinion on this thread that such kids are wasters who are no better than rabbits. Let me contrast both these women with another from my family. My aunt had a middle class upbringing with grammar school education. She acheived highly in her career and married a bloke who also did well. My uncle died early and by the time my aunt retired had accrued considerable assets. She has helped my family out considerably BUT, she uses an accountant who employs dubious means to help her with tax avoidance, that is, she avoids paying the government that which it can reasonably expect to receive from her. Further, she is one of the many career women who left it too late to have children.

So, on the one hand we have girls who want to wish to stay in their homes and raise children (a very Conservative ideal) and on the other a woman who is failing (and has failed) to carry out her social responsibility. Both have done their bit but those women You decry are still contributing to British society whilst another aims to do as little as possible
 

Similar threads

Top