Dont know if these have been on here before. But some amazing pics.

Ahem, RACISTS! :D
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M

MotorBoat

Guest
Can't work out how to upload (I'm shit, yes!)

The one at the top of the graves registration septic labeling the body bag gets me thinking. How did one end up in such a unit. Would doing graves registration have been considered a good craic (compared to combat)?


I've read a few accounts that they were mostly kept drunk in order to cope with such a gruesome task, albeit the only one I can place of the top of my head is from Citizen Soldiers by Stephen Ambrose, who is somewhat controversial for supposedly telling a few porkies...
 
There's a book called 'By tank into Normandy' about the experiences of a young British tank officer. He includes an unpublished piece by his unit Padre who took responsibility for looking after fatalities. He felt that no active tanker should have to see the aftermath.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Are you sure you dropped that Dime here Leroy?
  1. 7166460586_50c1b0af4b.jpg

 
There's a book called 'By tank into Normandy' about the experiences of a young British tank officer. He includes an unpublished piece by his unit Padre who took responsibility for looking after fatalities. He felt that no active tanker should have to see the aftermath.

I have a vague memory from a post on another thread that there is a book by that Padre and he also took on the responsibility for burying German tankers. Whilst doing so on one occasion he looked up from his labours to see he was being watched by the crew of a German tank who saluted him before departing. I can't begin to imagine the horrors he must have seen in removing the bodies from a destroyed tank.
 
I have a vague memory from a post on another thread that there is a book by that Padre and he also took on the responsibility for burying German tankers. Whilst doing so on one occasion he looked up from his labours to see he was being watched by the crew of a German tank who saluted him before departing. I can't begin to imagine the horrors he must have seen in removing the bodies from a destroyed tank.
'The Man Who Worked On Sundays' by the Rev. Leslie Skinner I believe was the book.
 
Is this the infamous camo that triggered a rash of friendly fire incidents on account that looking like an SS member
wasn't as good an idea as initially thought?
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Yes but the friendly-fire story does not seem to be corroborated by facts according to below Axishistory article....

The 30th division, along with the 2nd Armoured, was one of two divisions chosen by the Corps of Engineers to test camouflage uniforms during the Normandy Campaign. These uniforms were removed by the end of the campaign due to similarity with German uniforms and to keep friendly fire to a minimum.

http://www.flamesofwar.com/hobby.aspx?art_id=763

Lifted from Axishistory.com:

Generally speaking, the combat arms branches were opposed to camouflage due to their feelings about the use of camo in the Pacific in 1943, but the engineers believed in camo and were pushing the idea for Europe. As a result, it was decided that there would be three test battalions in Normandy wearing the camo in July. One battalion of the 30th ID - which earned them the nickname of "Roosevelt's SS", the organic combat engineer battalion of the 2nd Armored, and one battalion of the 2nd ID. I've not found any reference to the specific battalions by number for the infantry divisions, nor the regimetns. So you have a coverage of less than 1/14th table strength in each of the three divisions wearing these uniforms so that's a very small pool of people and all in front line positions with very high turnover. For instance, the second ID had 15,000 battle casualties from 6/44 to 5/45 against a table strength of 14,000. The British published books about US uniforms claim the camo was quickly withdrawn due to battle casualties from friendly fire as a result of mistaken identity for Waffen-SS dot camo. While researching this, I found that there were in fact friendly fire incidents between the 29th Division and the 2nd Division right after the 2nd ID came ashore, but it was caused by the dark green OD7 HBT fatigues being worn by the 2nd ID. The 29th had not seen that color before and it apparently looked to them like German reed green. I never found any specific historical incidents of friendly fire against the test battalions. I discussed this many years ago with Jonathan Gawne, editor of the defunct US edition of "Militaria Magazine," publisher of the old lamented "G.I. Journal" and author of "Spearheading D-Day" and many other books, who is probably the foremost authority on US uniforms. Jon told me he had researched the AARs in the National Archives specifically to find out about these alleged friendly fire incidents involving camouflage and he found nothing. Not one incident. Then he researched for the orders pulling the uniforms and found nothing. This British theory about US uniforms is further disproved by the fact that photos show these uniforms still being used by personnel in those units in late September 1944. The decision had already been made before the fact that camo would not be used in Europe and this "test" was merely a sop to the camo agitators in the Engineer Corps. The uniforms were issued to a relatively miniscule number of people and the uniforms were allowed to live out their combat lifespans of a few weeks and never replaced. It's notable that in the photos in September, such as the 2nd ID at Brest, there is usually only one or two men in each shot still surviving who has camo as compared to early July photos where everyone in the photo is wearing camo. The average lifespan of a combat infantryman with his unit in Europe was reckoned to be about 15 days. At that point, he was either dead or sent back wounded. Of course, we all know of guys who bought it immediately and others who survived straight through from June to May unscathed. However, you get the point. These uniforms didn't last long because the guys wearing them didn't last long.

http://forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=65332
 
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Top Hat Ally (even if he is a POW)

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These are French Colonial troops probably taken POW by German troops in 1940; the bowler and top hat were probably imposed by the Master's Race as III Reich propaganda always insisted it was a shame that France pretended to defend "Western civilisation" with "Untermensch" from the colonies. Putting "civilised" hats on Senegalese Tirailleurs probably meant something in the Propaganda codes of the 1000 years' Reich...
 

37ucv67i

War Hero
These are French Colonial troops probably taken POW by German troops in 1940; the bowler and top hat were probably imposed by the Master's Race as III Reich propaganda always insisted it was a shame that France pretended to defend "Western civilisation" with "Untermensch" from the colonies. Putting "civilised" hats on Senegalese Tirailleurs probably meant something in the Propaganda codes of the 1000 years' Reich...
The top hat and cigar thing was popular in the first round already: http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en/contributions/1189.
 

"Hey Sarge, do these new-fangled things work?"

"I don't know son, but they sure are better than the last method where we walked in front and stamped our feet!"
 
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