DON 5 and DON 10

Discussion in 'Royal Signals' started by old_bloke, Jan 9, 2013.

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  1. Just reread Spike Milligans War collection. Noticed the R.A was using DON 5 back then so was the R.Sigs too ?

    Also is DON 10 just 2 x more strands in it ? is there a DON 20 ? and WTF does DON stand for?

    Awaits incoming:)
     
  2. Each core has 7 strands of wire, 4 of which are plated copper wire and 3 strands of steel wire for toughness.

    So no.
     
  3. We used to use it to piss the LAD off by driving over it on Soltau thereby wrapping it as tightly as it would around the roadwheels like some kind of insane wire bazooka plate. Oh happy days.
     
  4. Yes, those steel strands could be quite sharp as I recall, sharp enough to puncture skin as you were trying to terminate a handset as I recall. No idea what DON stood for mind, good question though.
     
  5. According to the K Lacey website, who still manafacture it, it is simply D 10 telephone cable Mk4. DON 10 was a nickname.
     
  6. Isn't DON somesort of Navy thing? I don't know why, but for some reason or another I announced my radio serial number was DON 10 (it was D10) to the Instructor chappy and he responded 'We're not in the fcuking Navy'...
     
  7. I think I am right that Don was the phonetic alphabet for D in those days. as in S for Sugar etc.
     
  8. Not wishing to be WAH'ed but DON was used for D in the World War 1 phonetic alphabet.
     
  9. Don was the letter D in an early form of phonetic alphabet used by the RAF between 1924 and 1942, so Don 5 or Don 10 was just D5 or D10. Anyone remember the Toc H canteen on some camps? Toc was T in the same alphabet.

    Ace
    Beer
    Charlie
    Don
    Edward
    Freddie
    George
    Harry
    Ink
    Johnnie
    King
    London
    Monkey
    Nuts
    Orange
    Pip
    Queen
    Robert
    Sugar
    Toc
    Uncle
    Vic
    William
    X-ray
    Yorker
    Zebra
     
  10. Brotherton Lad

    Brotherton Lad LE Reviewer

    [TABLE="width: 663"]
    [TR]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]Royal Navy[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]Western Front slang
    or “signalese”[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF, colspan: 2"]RAF phonetic alphabet[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]US phonetic alphabet[/TH]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF, colspan: 2"]1914–1918 (WWI)[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]1924–1942[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]1943–1956[/TH]
    [TH="bgcolor: #F1EFEF"]1941–1956[/TH]
    [/TR]
    [TR="class: over"]
    [TD="bgcolor: #FFFEE9"]Apples
    Butter
    Charlie
    Duff
    Edward
    Freddy
    George
    Harry
    Ink
    Johnnie
    King
    London
    Monkey
    Nuts
    Orange
    Pudding
    Queenie
    Robert
    Sugar
    Tommy
    Uncle
    Vinegar
    Willie
    Xerxes
    Yellow
    Zebra[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #FFFEE9"]Ack
    Beer
    Charlie
    Don
    Edward
    Freddie
    Gee
    Harry
    Ink
    Johnnie
    King
    London
    Emma
    Nuts
    Oranges
    Pip
    Queen
    Robert
    Esses
    Toc
    Uncle
    Vic
    William
    X-ray
    Yorker
    Zebra[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #FFFEE9"]Ace
    Beer
    Charlie
    Don
    Edward
    Freddie
    George
    Harry
    Ink
    Johnnie
    King
    London
    Monkey
    Nuts
    Orange
    Pip
    Queen
    Robert
    Sugar
    Toc
    Uncle
    Vic
    William
    X-ray
    Yorker
    Zebra[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #FFFEE9"]Able/Affirm
    Baker
    Charlie
    Dog
    Easy
    Fox
    George
    How
    Item/Interrogatory
    Jig/Johnny
    King
    Love
    Mike
    Nab/Negat
    Oboe
    Peter/Prep
    Queen
    Roger
    Sugar
    Tare
    Uncle
    Victor
    William
    X-ray
    Yoke
    Zebra[/TD]
    [TD="bgcolor: #FFFEE9"]Able
    Baker
    Charlie
    Dog
    Easy
    Fox
    George
    How
    Item
    Jig
    King
    Love
    Mike
    Nan
    Oboe
    Peter
    Queen
    Roger
    Sugar
    Tare
    Uncle
    Victor
    William
    X-ray
    Yoke
    Zebra[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
     
  11. So what did Toc H actually stand for? I've fond memories of the ones in Germany but never asked why it was called what it was - I just accepted it.
     
  12. FORMER_FYRDMAN

    FORMER_FYRDMAN LE Book Reviewer

    Talbot House.

    Came back from a job in Germany once via Arnhem, Ypres and Poperinge. Planning the route, the conversation went like this:

    1st Stab: Let's go to Arnhem then Ypres.
    Col: Arnhem's well off route for our insurance.
    2nd Stab (FF): My map reading's shoite.
    Col: Let's go to Arnhem then Ypres.

    Excellent two days and very humbling.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. Don R was the nickname for a dispatch rider.
     

  14. Spot on Sir, Talbot House is a great place, can see how well regarded it must've been by the chaps resting between time at the sharp end....
     
  15. On the subject of phonetic alphabets, was there one between that 1924-1942 one and the current one?

    And was there a Nato one?

    And finally, was there an attempt to introduce one based upon city names?