Doing a degree in the Army.

Saguntum219

Clanker
Next month I’ll be starting my second year studying Law with the Open University. I have decided to join the British Army, either as a Royal Military Police Soldier (no, I don’t have many friends) or Intelligence Analyst. I haven’t yet applied due to not having British citizenship, but I have already started the process for citizenship and meet all the requirements.

There’s clearly going to be some complications arising from the fact that the Army joining process (Phase 1 and 2) and my university studies will more than likely overlap. If I was studying something else it wouldn’t be a big problem as I could simply put my studies on hold. However, the Law degree has to be completed in 6 years, failing to do so will disqualify Qualifying Law Degree status (QLD). It’d be rather pointless finishing a Law degree with no possibility of ever being a solicitor or barrister.

I’d like to hear from someone that has been in a similar predicament.

Thank you for your time.
 
I started studying for my degree whilst I was in the army, but this was a few years of being in. Personally I wouldn't expect to get much studying done whilst in training, and I'm not sure your DS would be too ecstatic with the idea either. Could you instead speak with the OU, or better still speak to the organisation who decide if it qualifies or not? In this situation they may give you an extension.
 

aberspr

Old-Salt
Afraid to say if you aren't yet a British Citizen it's unlikely you'll get Developed Vetting (DV) for the Intelligence Corps. You might have also have some major issues with getting the Security Check (SC) vetting for the RMP.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
I've been living in the UK since I was 8 years old (currently 22) and have had indefinite leave to remain status since 2003. I went to primary school, secondary school, and college in this country. I have no criminal record. And the country that I'm from is in the EU. I also have a stepbrother that's in the infantry. He's an NCO in for full service. Surely some of that has to count for something.
 
I've been living in the UK since I was 8 years old (currently 22) and have had indefinite leave to remain status since 2003. I went to primary school, secondary school, and college in this country. I have no criminal record. And the country that I'm from is in the EU. I also have a stepbrother that's in the infantry. He's an NCO in for full service. Surely some of that has to count for something.

These are not unreasonable questions, why not speak to an online recruiter?
 

sup rec

LE
Book Reviewer
I've been living in the UK since I was 8 years old (currently 22) and have had indefinite leave to remain status since 2003. I went to primary school, secondary school, and college in this country. I have no criminal record. And the country that I'm from is in the EU. I also have a stepbrother that's in the infantry. He's an NCO in for full service. Surely some of that has to count for something.

The only thing that counts is that you have ILR and have been here long enough to get citizenship. An EU country counts for nothing as EU citizens are not eligible to join the British Army and having a serving stepbrother also counts for diddly squat. A question that almost certainly be asked is that why has it taken 14 years to apply for citizenship.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
Finish your qualifications, the Army will always be here
I'll be almost 29 when I finish! I'd really like a change from the civilian world.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
The only thing that counts is that you have ILR and have been here long enough to get citizenship. An EU country counts for nothing as EU citizens are not eligible to join the British Army and having a serving stepbrother also counts for diddly squat. A question that almost certainly be asked is that why has it taken 14 years to apply for citizenship.

You're absolutely right, it does need asking. My parents couldn't afford it when I was younger. I haven't paid for it myself as I didn't need it for anything. Until now that is. Youthful mistake down to naivety, I admit. I've already filled out the 18 page form, just need a solicitor to sign it and it will be off.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
I started studying for my degree whilst I was in the army, but this was a few years of being in. Personally I wouldn't expect to get much studying done whilst in training, and I'm not sure your DS would be too ecstatic with the idea either. Could you instead speak with the OU, or better still speak to the organisation who decide if it qualifies or not? In this situation they may give you an extension.

It wouldn't be good for bonding, either. Who's going to like a bloke that's sat in the corner reading a Law book all the time? I'm going to contact them tomorrow. Hopefully it will work out.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
If any of you have wondered why a foreigner (I'm originally from Lithuania) would want to join the British Army, I’ll give you a brief explanation. I could write an essay, but I doubt anyone would want to read it! First of all, the military has always been in the back of my mind from a young age. Both of my grandfather’s served in the Soviet Army, one served during WW2 and was decorated for bravery. My dad served for 2 years in the Soviet Army for national service in the late 70s. Luckily for me, he survived Dedovshchina; otherwise I wouldn't have been born! I consider military service to be a rite of passage.

Why the British army? I think the British Army is the most professional and respectable Army in the world. Period. The British Army also has a rich history that’s unmatched. Joining the British Army is a way for me to give back to a country that has given me so much.
 
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OP, I've just finished my second year of law with the OU. it's quite an escalation on last year. You won't be able to complete it and go through phase 1.

You won't really be able to pick it up again for the first few years because of the training you undergo, new unit, exercises etc etc, it will be a very busy time for you.

I'm only able to study because I'm in rehabilitation and I've done 23 years.

Remember if your eventual intention is to become a solicitor or barrister, you must complete the LLB in a maximum of 6 years, you must also complete the LPC and you won't want a big gap between both.

Either bin the degree for the time being and do it later, the Army will support you with this, or complete they degree and join as an officer, or train as a solicitor and join Army Legal Services.

If you crack on this year ensure you make good notes and remember the significant cases and why they are significant.
 
D

Deleted 76563

Guest
The only thing that counts is that you have ILR and have been here long enough to get citizenship. An EU country counts for nothing as EU citizens are not eligible to join the British Army and having a serving stepbrother also counts for diddly squat. A question that almost certainly be asked is that why has it taken 14 years to apply for citizenship.
Just nitpicking but a fair few Paddies in the Brit forces.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
OP, I've just finished my second year of law with the OU. it's quite an escalation on last year. You won't be able to complete it and go through phase 1.

You won't really be able to pick it up again for the first few years because of the training you undergo, new unit, exercises etc etc, it will be a very busy time for you.

I'm only able to study because I'm in rehabilitation and I've done 23 years.

Remember if your eventual intention is to become a solicitor or barrister, you must complete the LLB in a maximum of 6 years, you must also complete the LPC and you won't want a big gap between both.

Either bin the degree for the time being and do it later, the Army will support you with this, or complete they degree and join as an officer, or train as a solicitor and join Army Legal Services.

If you crack on this year ensure you make good notes and remember the significant cases and why they are significant.

That is a hard decision to make, considering I got a distinction for my first year. Is time really going to be so limited in phase 1 and 2? As amazing lobster mentioned above, I'm going to contact the OU and see if I can postpone it.
 
D

Deleted 76563

Guest
You're absolutely right, it does need asking. My parents couldn't afford it when I was younger. I haven't paid for it myself as I didn't need it for anything. Until now that is. Youthful mistake down to naivety, I admit. I've already filled out the 18 page form, just need a solicitor to sign it and it will be off.
Finish your degree, do your pupilage and sign it yourself. Just a thought.
Good luck either way.
 
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Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
You should definitely hang on and finish your degree and all the other stuff you need to do in order to become a lawyer. There is zero chance of your finding the time during Phase 1 or 2 to keep up with the workload, so you might as well forget that.

If I were you, I'd look at joining the Army Reserve or the OTC at your university and getting a taste of the military life while keeping sufficient time available to keep up with your studies. This will give you the chance to work on your clearance status, acquire some skills and perhaps some rank and allow you take a much cooler look at a full-time military career when you finish your studies.
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
You should definitely hang on and finish your degree and all the other stuff you need to do in order to become a lawyer. There is zero chance of your finding the time during Phase 1 or 2 to keep up with the workload, so you might as well forget that.

If I were you, I'd look at joining the Army Reserve or the OTC at your university and getting a taste of the military life while keeping sufficient time available to keep up with your studies. This will give you the chance to work on your clearance status, acquire some skills and perhaps some rank and allow you take a much cooler look at a full-time military career when you finish your studies.

I'm not sure if the OU has OTC. I've had a search on the internet to no avail. 5 years is a damn long time to wait. What's the territorial army to regular army transfer process like?

And to be absolutely honest, I don't want to go in as an officer. For 2 reasons. 1) I want a more hands on experience. From what I've read, officers fill a management and administration role 2) I'm not ready. I can't imagine myself commanding a platoon or troop filled with men who are far more experienced than me. Even after Sandhurst. Maybe a stint in the TA will destroy my doubts.
 
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Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
I'm not sure if the OU has OTC. I've had a search on the internet to no avail. 5 years is a damn long time to wait. What's the territorial army to regular army transfer process like?
At the moment, it's pretty easy, I gather, to make the move - things may change as the op tempo declines, but, given the rebalancing between Regular and Reserve (as and when it happens), I wouldn't expect them to. There are a range of options which allow Regular service without taking on a full Regular engagement if you don't want to, as well, I gather.

You're quite right on the OU and OTC - my mistake, hadn't noticed that was your university. How are you funding your study at the moment?
 

Saguntum219

Clanker
At the moment, it's pretty easy, I gather, to make the move - things may change as the op tempo declines, but, given the rebalancing between Regular and Reserve (as and when it happens), I wouldn't expect them to. There are a range of options which allow Regular service without taking on a full Regular engagement if you don't want to, as well, I gather.

You're quite right on the OU and OTC - my mistake, hadn't noticed that was your university. How are you funding your study at the moment?

I paid for the first year myself and have taken a student loan for the second.
 

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