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Does working hard still make you rich?

The real 'dole' should be vouchers for shops, utility companies and a very small amount of cash. We shouldn't be supporting someone's career choice of idleness, but we should be supporting them with food, a simple roof above their head and not much else, until they find employment.

The debacle that is the idle through fictitious disabilities, should be sorted. However, it's needs to be done properly and not in a cackhanded payments-by-results sh1tshow that was the Medical assessment scandal.

Being too fat** to walk shouldnt be getting disability benefits either - or blue badges-
Gym membership and look for work


**Im talking lard arses whose mcdonalds and no exercise lifestyle has resulted in obesity diabetes and i cant walk to the bus stop / manage the stairs because i get out of breath after 3 steps. - Not those who have gone the other wxay a medical condition results in weight gain / treatment of does.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
Hard work.

I have to be on site at 07.00 one hour before the brickies. On an extension or new build I have to place blocks in stacks of ten, one metre apart along the inside of the footings. In the space there has to be a mixing board placed on two blocks.

On the outside of the footings, the house bricks (and engineering blocks) have to be in stacks of twenty, again one metre apart around the exterior of the footings.

Then 140 litres of sand, water and cement is hoyed into the mixer and after about five minutes poured into a barrow and coverered. Another mix is then made. The consistency has to be exactly the same. Brickies have been know to tip over a full mixing board of morter and walk off if it's not right. A handful of brick ties are left with each board.

Brickies rock up about 07.40 and I'm then on tea duty until 08.00

I then push the barrow along the footings, filling up the mixing boards, back to the mixer pour into the barrow and rinse and repeat until 10.30 tea break. I once again make the brews and ensure that the mixing boards are loaded before they come out. Often I get called over to hold one end of a tape measure or to move a string line up.

Lunch at 12.30 for 30 minutes, tea at 14.30 for twenty minutes.

When they down tools at 16.00 I have to wash and dry the trowels, pointing sticks and levels. Clean the boards and wash out the mixer. I leave about 30 minutes after they do.

All fairly mundane and easy. However, once we reach the first floor, I'm handballing blocks, bricks and morter up a ladder onto scaffolding. When we get higher its two ladders. The brickies cannot run out of morter or bricks.

I get zero thanks and earn £100 a day regardless. (nothing if we get ragged of with rain) a brickie will earn a minimum of £225 a day, more if he's paid per brick. (that I have to supply him with.)

I get home every night completely knackered, often soaked and always starving but I sleep well and I'm on site at 07.00 the next morning.

Do I have to do this? No.
Do I enjoy it? Yes.
Will I ever be rich? Hahahahaha!
 
All fairly mundane and easy. However, once we reach the first floor, I'm handballing blocks, bricks and morter up a ladder onto scaffolding. When we get higher its two ladders. The brickies cannot run out of morter or bricks.
You need to speak to da man bugs he will tell you how to scale backflip and somersault up the scaffolding with yon hod
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
You need to speak to da man bugs he will tell you how to scale backflip and somersault up the scaffolding with yon hod.
Haha! I would, but unfortunately I've actually worked on building sites, but like many of his lies, he hasn't.

But...

With his interpretation fees, picture framing and the dole, he is obviously richer than me.
 
Do you already have a degree, or other post grad qualification like a DMS, or MBA?

nope, GCSE's from the 90's some NVQ's

I'm a tradesmen from an industry where product knowledge rules...

The city centre appears to be wall 2 wall fanny on a lunch time, a low end profession like conveyancing must be more £ for less shite.... I could leave work & be shit faced by 6pm rather than some days spending hours driving home
 
nope, GCSE's from the 90's some NVQ's

I'm a tradesmen from an industry where product knowledge rules...

The city centre appears to be wall 2 wall fanny on a lunch time, a low end profession like conveyancing must be more £ for less shite.... I could leave work & be shit faced by 6pm rather than some days spending hours driving home

There is something to doing a trade.

I joined the army with GCE's and when I left I went to university where I spent 8 years, after the first 3 years I was actually being paid money to be there and I collected a fair few letters to crayon after my name. The house I bought when I went to uni needed fixing up, I had never done anything like that, bought a readers digest diy manual and set to it. The house went up in value with the work I put in, so we sold it, bought another and repeated the process. I had no sensible job offers when I finished uni as it was a bit of a recession so I wandered off to the local college, picked up a plumbing C&G, passed the gas exams and carried on fixing up houses. 20+ years later I am still at it, next year I am going to be a builder and actually build a whole house - for sale.

Back at uni a mate was doing his PhD in some astro-physics rocket science thing, spent a year with NASA and received a job offer from them. He also jacked it and went to the local technical college once he had his PhD in his pocket and learnt plastering. He ended up with his own small plastering and general building firm, bought a dilapidated chateau in France and was slowly renovating that. Every couple of months he would take his blokes over for a one week busmans holiday in France to fix his place up. His ambition was to run it as a base for people to do outdoor pursuits from, ie. climbing, mountain biking, canoeing, etc.

Even my BiL succumbed when he retired from his high paying city job. He swapped his Saville Row suits for overalls and got into the practical end of property development and was much happier and less stressed up to his armpits in builders rubble than he ever was auditing a FTSE company.

Trades also pay pretty damn well too ;) don't tell anyone though. I know more blokes who have made their million shovelling rubble and shite than I have people who have made their money pushing paper.
 
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Hard work.

I have to be on site at 07.00 one hour before the brickies. On an extension or new build I have to place blocks in stacks of ten, one metre apart along the inside of the footings. In the space there has to be a mixing board placed on two blocks.

On the outside of the footings, the house bricks (and engineering blocks) have to be in stacks of twenty, again one metre apart around the exterior of the footings.

Then 140 litres of sand, water and cement is hoyed into the mixer and after about five minutes poured into a barrow and coverered. Another mix is then made. The consistency has to be exactly the same. Brickies have been know to tip over a full mixing board of morter and walk off if it's not right. A handful of brick ties are left with each board.

Brickies rock up about 07.40 and I'm then on tea duty until 08.00

I then push the barrow along the footings, filling up the mixing boards, back to the mixer pour into the barrow and rinse and repeat until 10.30 tea break. I once again make the brews and ensure that the mixing boards are loaded before they come out. Often I get called over to hold one end of a tape measure or to move a string line up.

Lunch at 12.30 for 30 minutes, tea at 14.30 for twenty minutes.

When they down tools at 16.00 I have to wash and dry the trowels, pointing sticks and levels. Clean the boards and wash out the mixer. I leave about 30 minutes after they do.

All fairly mundane and easy. However, once we reach the first floor, I'm handballing blocks, bricks and morter up a ladder onto scaffolding. When we get higher its two ladders. The brickies cannot run out of morter or bricks.

I get zero thanks and earn £100 a day regardless. (nothing if we get ragged of with rain) a brickie will earn a minimum of £225 a day, more if he's paid per brick. (that I have to supply him with.)

I get home every night completely knackered, often soaked and always starving but I sleep well and I'm on site at 07.00 the next morning.

Do I have to do this? No.
Do I enjoy it? Yes.
Will I ever be rich? Hahahahaha!
Your off your head and there having a laugh , if brickies don’t have a good labour there not worth a toss to any site 3 in one squad .

what we have is the labour starts 30 mins in front mixes mortar loads up the boards and loads up Block or brick etc, help move up the hop up scaffolding etc

does the same throughout the day finish his last mix an hour before stopping time cleans the mixer covers the block ,brick , job sorted , he gets a cut of the price not £100.00 a day that’s crap money .
and your out of there pdq after the gears sorted not working longer than them there having a good giraffe.
 

Tyk

LE
Your off your head and there having a laugh , if brickies don’t have a good labour there not worth a toss to any site 3 in one squad .

what we have is the labour starts 30 mins in front mixes mortar loads up the boards and loads up Block or brick etc, help move up the hop up scaffolding etc

does the same throughout the day finish his last mix an hour before stopping time cleans the mixer covers the block ,brick , job sorted , he gets a cut of the price not £100.00 a day that’s crap money .
and your out of there pdq after the gears sorted not working longer than them there having a good giraffe.

Any chance you can translate that from utter mong into English?
 
What do people think of going into business with family and in-laws?

You see them around Christmas and birthdays, but I imagine it must be quite hard working with them day in, day out. If you're running a joint business then it's inevitable that there will be disagreements or one person will do more than the other. This can easily breed contempt and if there's money involved I imagine it can turn ugly.

You also can't really fire family members and remain on good terms. Business is, I imagine, quite ruthless and at the end of the day other people are only there as an asset to make you rich. I imagine it's important to be nice to them, but you can't really be best mates with them.

Does anyone else have experience with this? It must be great to start off with cos you can share the work and ideas and as the company grows it might also be important to have another person help run it.
Family farms would be a case in point. From personal experience inter-generational conflict is often a massive issue; as is sibling conflict, especially when one wishes to carry on farming and the other to cash their share in.
Succesdion planning should be a part of every Business Studies course, ag or otherwise.
 
Good thread! It provokes a number of thoughts.

I've done alright by luckily choosing the right job or opportunity at the right time. Believe me that really was mostly luck. On my side of the equation I have seized opportunities when they presented themselves and made myself ready for the next one. (Now that I've written that down it sounds like a hamster wheel. I am a lot duller than I thought.)

Not doing anything is not an aspiration of mine at all. I can't imagine a worse fate that having no goals or anything left to work at, even if it just improving the lot of someone else. Lying around all day is a nice thing, once every two months or so, but as a long-term plan it would lead me only to rack and ruin. Idle hands...and all that.

If you want to make money, do something that other people can't do or don't want to do for themselves. The only other option is to come up with an original idea and exploit it before someone else does.

I've seen quite a few people inherit good companies or lots of money, then burn it fast. It seems that for many people, if they are not involved in the creation of something they don't value it.

I have often thought that I could happily live a stripped-back life, without all the material possessions. But it would be an adjustment as I am now used to that way of life. I would probably miss the feeling of having influence and making a difference, but I reckon I could get over that in time.

As I said, good thread and food for thought.
 

anglo

LE
Hard work.

I have to be on site at 07.00 one hour before the brickies. On an extension or new build I have to place blocks in stacks of ten, one metre apart along the inside of the footings. In the space there has to be a mixing board placed on two blocks.

On the outside of the footings, the house bricks (and engineering blocks) have to be in stacks of twenty, again one metre apart around the exterior of the footings.

Then 140 litres of sand, water and cement is hoyed into the mixer and after about five minutes poured into a barrow and coverered. Another mix is then made. The consistency has to be exactly the same. Brickies have been know to tip over a full mixing board of morter and walk off if it's not right. A handful of brick ties are left with each board.

Brickies rock up about 07.40 and I'm then on tea duty until 08.00

I then push the barrow along the footings, filling up the mixing boards, back to the mixer pour into the barrow and rinse and repeat until 10.30 tea break. I once again make the brews and ensure that the mixing boards are loaded before they come out. Often I get called over to hold one end of a tape measure or to move a string line up.

Lunch at 12.30 for 30 minutes, tea at 14.30 for twenty minutes.

When they down tools at 16.00 I have to wash and dry the trowels, pointing sticks and levels. Clean the boards and wash out the mixer. I leave about 30 minutes after they do.

All fairly mundane and easy. However, once we reach the first floor, I'm handballing blocks, bricks and morter up a ladder onto scaffolding. When we get higher its two ladders. The brickies cannot run out of morter or bricks.

I get zero thanks and earn £100 a day regardless. (nothing if we get ragged of with rain) a brickie will earn a minimum of £225 a day, more if he's paid per brick. (that I have to supply him with.)

I get home every night completely knackered, often soaked and always starving but I sleep well and I'm on site at 07.00 the next morning.

Do I have to do this? No.
Do I enjoy it? Yes.
Will I ever be rich? Hahahahaha!
A dit,
many years ago I was working in a NCB central workshop, they a a area full of lathe
type machines, there was a man who kept the machines clean.
If any of the operators went for a tea break or even a piss, this bloke cleaned their machines
Every morning the men came in to start work on clean machine,
at the end of the week all the men paid him for the cleaning,
he was the best paid man in the whole workshop

The brickies should be paying you, you actually make a lot of their money,
as they properly get paid on the amount of bricks laid,
 
A dit,
many years ago I was working in a NCB central workshop, they a a area full of lathe
type machines, there was a man who kept the machines clean.
If any of the operators went for a tea break or even a piss, this bloke cleaned their machines
Every morning the men came in to start work on clean machine,
at the end of the week all the men paid him for the cleaning,
he was the best paid man in the whole workshop

The brickies should be paying you, you actually make a lot of their money,
as they properly get paid on the amount of bricks laid,
Bang on the money if it wasn’t for the Labrador retriever they be stopped loading themselves no cash in that .
 
Hard work.

I have to be on site at 07.00 one hour before the brickies. On an extension or new build I have to place blocks in stacks of ten, one metre apart along the inside of the footings. In the space there has to be a mixing board placed on two blocks.

On the outside of the footings, the house bricks (and engineering blocks) have to be in stacks of twenty, again one metre apart around the exterior of the footings.

Then 140 litres of sand, water and cement is hoyed into the mixer and after about five minutes poured into a barrow and coverered. Another mix is then made. The consistency has to be exactly the same. Brickies have been know to tip over a full mixing board of morter and walk off if it's not right. A handful of brick ties are left with each board.

Brickies rock up about 07.40 and I'm then on tea duty until 08.00

I then push the barrow along the footings, filling up the mixing boards, back to the mixer pour into the barrow and rinse and repeat until 10.30 tea break. I once again make the brews and ensure that the mixing boards are loaded before they come out. Often I get called over to hold one end of a tape measure or to move a string line up.

Lunch at 12.30 for 30 minutes, tea at 14.30 for twenty minutes.

When they down tools at 16.00 I have to wash and dry the trowels, pointing sticks and levels. Clean the boards and wash out the mixer. I leave about 30 minutes after they do.

All fairly mundane and easy. However, once we reach the first floor, I'm handballing blocks, bricks and morter up a ladder onto scaffolding. When we get higher its two ladders. The brickies cannot run out of morter or bricks.

I get zero thanks and earn £100 a day regardless. (nothing if we get ragged of with rain) a brickie will earn a minimum of £225 a day, more if he's paid per brick. (that I have to supply him with.)

I get home every night completely knackered, often soaked and always starving but I sleep well and I'm on site at 07.00 the next morning.

Do I have to do this? No.
Do I enjoy it? Yes.
Will I ever be rich? Hahahahaha!

That sounds exactly like:

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich.
Novel by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn.
 
Any chance you can translate that from utter mong into English?
Translation: the building game is the closest thing you’ll get to the military, it strips years off your body and make you way old before your time.

A Brickies Labrador Retriever, being the hardest job on a site, you don’t need the piss taken out of you while your making someone else good money.

That’s the best translation you’ll get unless you work in the game then you’ll understand .
 
Translation: the building game is the closest thing you’ll get to the military, it strips years off your body and make you way old before your time.

A Brickies Labrador Retriever, being the hardest job on a site, you don’t need the piss taken out of you while your making someone else good money.

That’s the best translation you’ll get unless you work in the game then you’ll understand .


Memory jog:-

There was a brickies laborer who made a fortune by having a double size hod, Max Quarterman, his rags to riches story is fascinating and quite remarkable, he was known as " Super Hod" he eventually expanded into house building and renovations, gaining a fabulous house and a Rolls Royce, he died a few years ago.
 
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I know more blokes who have made their million shovelling rubble and shite than I have people who have made their money pushing paper.
I know more who've made it pushing paper...but I work in Banking.

Case in point - one of my best mates, same age as me, same school (though he went to Oxford to study Economics and I...didn't).

He has just left JP Morgan and at the same time bought a £2.2 Million house (roughly 50% deposit put down). I know a fair few who've done similar. I joined the Army for 10 years, before getting into Banking for (now) 5 years. He's got the Bank Balance; I've got the shit dits.
 
Haha! I would, but unfortunately I've actually worked on building sites, but like many of his lies, he hasn't.

But...

With his interpretation fees, picture framing and the dole, he is obviously richer than me.

Judging by your posts you're clearly an educated man, have you ever considered going for site or project management?

One of my mates was in sales and marketing, he lost his job recently due to covid and worked on a farm, now he's a cleaner at Tesco and loves it - no stress, just do the job and go home.

The money might be crap but it's probably pretty good for mental health, he can just sit back and listen to music or a podcast.

I'm still trying to get out of my job but leaving education isn't easy, particularly at this time with everyone is looking for work. I might have a look at plastering too.
 
I know more who've made it pushing paper...but I work in Banking.

Case in point - one of my best mates, same age as me, same school (though he went to Oxford to study Economics and I...didn't).

He has just left JP Morgan and at the same time bought a £2.2 Million house (roughly 50% deposit put down). I know a fair few who've done similar. I joined the Army for 10 years, before getting into Banking for (now) 5 years. He's got the Bank Balance; I've got the shit dits.

I guess it's a way to get rich but I don't have much respect for bankers. Tho I guess the most I know of it is from reading City Boy by that twit Geraint Anderson. It seems they do very little to actually help society and spend their days doing spectacularly dull stuff for their own monetary gain, what sort of philosophy is that?

One time when I was volunteering at a museum one of the older guys started chatting to me, he told me he used to be a banker. My reaction was as though he'd just told me he was a kiddie fiddler.
 

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