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Does working hard still make you rich?

I thought that only the poorly paid people worked hard. Not thinking of anyone in particular.

I was told that "work like horse, eat like dog" is a Russian proverb. If it isn't, perhaps it should be. But it's the same idea, hard workers don't always get big rewards.
 
Aren't you an attorney now?

No. Never had any intention to be. I did a law degree for 4 reasons.

1. I could do it through the OU and not have to travel anywhere.
2. I wanted to better understand why the law is an ass.
3. Bragging rights (it’s a law degree FFS)
4. It was the most expensive degree I could find and the Army were paying, I figured they owed me that much.

Not necessarily in that order.
 

miner69er

Old-Salt
Two ways fo looking at it. Number 1 - Only fools and Hroses work. mates grandad was proud of never working a day in his life. He went to the pub every saturday and had his 2 weeks a year in Benidorm, had a happy life.
Or you could go down the Mother Teresa route:
People are often unreasonable, irrational, and self-centered. Forgive them anyway.
If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives. Be kind anyway.
If you are successful, you will win some unfaithful friends and some genuine enemies. Succeed anyway.
If you are honest and sincere people may deceive you. Be honest and sincere anyway.
What you spend years creating, others could destroy overnight. Create anyway.
If you find serenity and happiness, some may be jealous. Be happy anyway.
The good you do today, will often be forgotten. Do good anyway.
Give the best you have, and it will never be enough. Give your best anyway.
In the final analysis, it is between you and God. It was never between you and them anyway.


PS sorry for the god quote am not a Holy Joe
 
No. Never had any intention to be. I did a law degree for 4 reasons.

1. I could do it through the OU and not have to travel anywhere.
2. I wanted to better understand why the law is an ass.
3. Bragging rights (it’s a law degree FFS)
4. It was the most expensive degree I could find and the Army were paying, I figured they owed me that much.

Not necessarily in that order.
Well good for you. Sorry for assuming you were practicing at some level. But hey maybe you could put your skills to use to represent your fellows getting dicked around by your government.
 
The problem is trying to balance your time so you can invest in your own business and also to find something that's niche enough to work. Unfortunately covid has put a stop to my own little experiment. I guess I need to up skill and learn new tech or coding, a pity it seems so dull.

Anything that you find 'dull', you probably won't invest the time and effort required to make it a success.

I've a photography hobby that's really taken off and turning from a 'hobby job' into something much more; I had 40ish photography jobs booked in this year till the corona' spannered the works (though still got some jobs on).

I've three running event businesses paying me to cover their series of running races (some of these jobs last from Fri to Mon, then another day editing; they're long ultra marathons), but to get them I had to do a lot of free race photography to hone my skills and get exposure. It was a lot of 'work'.

If I didn't enjoy what I do, I doubt I'd've put the effort in.

Is there anything you enjoy doing that you can turn into a business?
 
This is my life now to a T, getting up when I want, having a couple of glasses of whisky at night watching the days go by . That's the gift of being retired for the past 5 years. Prior to that I did not claim a days dole in my life not hugely rich in a monetary sense but We live pretty well and I have my family and my wife and I have just celebrated 48 years of marriage life is what you make it.
 

Chef

LE
I'm inclined to agree with @bullet_catcher inasmuch as hard work has never made you rich. Miners work hard, so do teachers and nurses. It can certainly point you in the right direction and short of winning the lottery there's usually an element of application required.

Add to this if one's the sort of person who has no self esteem or self worth then a life on the dole is probably acceptable. However the one's who proclaim work a mug's game the loudest tend to be the ones embarrassed by their situation.

It can be annoying that such a situation exists but not many people are proud of never having worked a day in their lives whatever they may say.
 
From personal experience , an awful lot can be in the timing:
Post Army, headed down to that there London as there was a bit of a recession on up in the North East, literally-and I mean that in a non woke manner-no jobs to be had.
London was the same old frazzled round the edges, boozy but still worth a shag good time girl that it's been for centuries,play your cards right and you'll get seconds with a cabbies breakfast chucked in.
I was lucky and it worked for me, grafted like f*ck for 30 years almost to the day and then just walked: mortgage paid off, good pension taken early and all the time in the world is mine.
 
Financially Rich? And Whats rich? $100 k a year? $1000k a year?
 
Anything that you find 'dull', you probably won't invest the time and effort required to make it a success.

I've a photography hobby that's really taken off and turning from a 'hobby job' into something much more; I had 40ish photography jobs booked in this year till the corona' spannered the works (though still got some jobs on).

I've three running event businesses paying me to cover their series of running races (some of these jobs last from Fri to Mon, then another day editing; they're long ultra marathons), but to get them I had to do a lot of free race photography to hone my skills and get exposure. It was a lot of 'work'.

If I didn't enjoy what I do, I doubt I'd've put the effort in.

Is there anything you enjoy doing that you can turn into a business?

The dad of an old school mate of the daughters (I used to go have a pint with him when the kids got together) in the UK is a professional photographer, has been ever since he started work. Started out doing the usual passport and wedding phoggies working for a photographer. He made a good name for himself and set about his own business doing the same, racing between a few weddings every weekend. He did work for a local estate agency and started to become the go to bloke for all the local agencies ending up doing mainly the posh houses where some level of ability to talk to clients was required. He hit it lucky with a Lord mayors banquet in the City of London and with the level of service he gave he became the go to bloke for many of the big formal city events. At college he had ambitions of being a fashion photographer, his Mrs was a lovely model (still a lovely milf) in her day and he dabbled as and when he had the opportunity. he has over the years done Vogue, GQ, Tatler and a few others and has enough contacts to get his daughter a work placement in Vogue office in Paris.

He is a genuinely nice bloke, does good work, has successfully built a list of people who call him first......but it took some pain, a lot of work and the willingness to do the shitty jobs that everyone thought they were too good for.

Keep pushing and keep submitting those photos to magazines mate.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I was ill a few years back and had to take a few months off work. The council overpaid my rent on top of JSA so I was earning enough to sit back and relax and even save money.

It was fekin great. I spent my time reading interesting books in the sunshine and having pointless arguments with people on the internet. I downloaded loads of stuff off the net and was able to binge watch Homeland until 4am then stay in bed until noon the next day. I also squandered my time seducing local floozies who I could then poke until the neighbours complained about the smell, after all I didn't have to go to work.

Unfortunately my landlord put the rent up so it all came to an end, I'd put any of the above as better than sitting in the morning commute or typing crap into an excel spreadsheet.

I think the main problem is that jobs don't really pay enough when the temptation to go on the dole is so great. I also used to work in a call centre for minimum wage, who would willingly want to do that?

I was on the dole in 2011+. Couldn't get my rent paid in full, burnt through my savings (£2000+ to move, even if someone would take DHSS). No more useful courses available, not even first aid (though english as second language and maths were).
Had to apply for 10 jobs a fortnight, then 10 a week.
Despite having a Masters degree (NOT in sociology!), sanctioned to go on a week long 'jobskills and CV writing course', at my expense.
Meanwhile, got forklift licences - no joy , only charity/ volunteer experience. Can't afford to wait a month for wages, can't afford to do a 'trial period' & have dole shut-off for 6 weeks (assuming re-application goes smoothly). Day rates worse than the dole.

Thinking back to fat cnut who dealt in second hand cars on the dole with a council house without being constrained. Wonder why I bothered being edumacated. Or indeed, trying.
Except I would have gone (more) mental not doing *something*.

Now? I could amuse myself, fannying about, woodwork, volunteer stuff. Grateful for the job I have, though sometimes I do think why - when there's scum rinsing the system.
 
A large dose of luck is usually required. Hard work helps though.

Rarely are truer words written.

In my world, if you were an "internet banker" in 2000, you were minted. If you were an "internet banker" in 2002 you were unemployable.

So much in life comes down to timing, and the luck that comes from that. Hard work is assumed.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I was on the dole in 2011+. Couldn't get my rent paid in full, burnt through my savings (£2000+ to move, even if someone would take DHSS). No more useful courses available, not even first aid (though english as second language and maths were).
Had to apply for 10 jobs a fortnight, then 10 a week.
Despite having a Masters degree (NOT in sociology!), sanctioned to go on a week long 'jobskills and CV writing course', at my expense.
Meanwhile, got forklift licences - no joy , only charity/ volunteer experience. Can't afford to wait a month for wages, can't afford to do a 'trial period' & have dole shut-off for 6 weeks (assuming re-application goes smoothly). Day rates worse than the dole.

Thinking back to fat cnut who dealt in second hand cars on the dole with a council house without being constrained. Wonder why I bothered being edumacated. Or indeed, trying.
Except I would have gone (more) mental not doing *something*.

Now? I could amuse myself, fannying about, woodwork, volunteer stuff. Grateful for the job I have, though sometimes I do think why - when there's scum rinsing the system.

Apologies, forgot to add 'Woe is me, woe is me! Pity meeeeeeee!'
and
'Doing nothing means a lot to me'
 
Financially Rich? And Whats rich? $100 k a year? $1000k a year?

Interesting article on that recently. Chuck Schwab did some survey type thingy recently and it threw up that most people believe they have hit it rich if they are worth $2.3 million spondoolicks.


In my experience the US is a very "Keep up with the Joneses" (no offence Jonesy) culture. Everyone has to have a car, everyone has to have a pick up, a motorcycle, a jetski if you live in Florida, an iPhone, a huge flat screen TV, etc, etc, etc. The Mrs, who works in the personal finance sector, tells me that the average household here has debt of $60K on top of their mortgage, if they have one, that is the average........we don't have debt so someone has out share.

I know senior executives who are in huge debt, huge. They want to send the kids to just the right university, get a car for each kid because their friends will talk if they don't, go on that holiday to Cabo every year, have that boat in the marina, along with the big Harley they ride 4 times a year, the wives all need a housekeeper because they can't possibly do the housework with their expensive manicure, and it goes on. But, yeah, I know a couple of blokes who earn, with bonus around $350K a year, who could not lay their hands on a $1000 bucks if they went begging at the bank.

The wifes biggest issue at work is people coming to her for pay advances and having to fcuk them off - something that rarely ever used to happen in the UK. As an FYI for UK residents; unlike the UK where you get paid monthly in the US most get paid fortnightly here because if they were paid monthly they would starve during the last two weeks of the months.

We live a sensible frugal lifestyle here, no cleaner, shop around for everything, don't try to impress the neighbours, and tuck the money away for retirement.
 
I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it
I can't help thinking if your aim is to be rich you're probably in the wrong industry.

I know I will never make as much money as my dad did. I suspect after tax the old bugger is better off on his pension than I am working full time. In my view that's a price worth paying for a job that I enjoy and makes me feel like I'm doing something useful (most of the time anyway). Plus there's the holidays and basically getting paid to burn stuff.

I also reckon that if you tried being feckless dole scum you'd be bored out of your mind after a few months. I know that after a 6 week summer holiday I'm looking forward to getting back to work.
 
Interesting article on that recently. Chuck Schwab did some survey type thingy recently and it threw up that most people believe they have hit it rich if they are worth $2.3 million spondoolicks.


In my experience the US is a very "Keep up with the Joneses" (no offence Jonesy) culture. Everyone has to have a car, everyone has to have a pick up, a motorcycle, a jetski if you live in Florida, an iPhone, a huge flat screen TV, etc, etc, etc. The Mrs, who works in the personal finance sector, tells me that the average household here has debt of $60K on top of their mortgage, if they have one, that is the average........we don't have debt so someone has out share.

I know senior executives who are in huge debt, huge. They want to send the kids to just the right university, get a car for each kid because their friends will talk if they don't, go on that holiday to Cabo every year, have that boat in the marina, along with the big Harley they ride 4 times a year, the wives all need a housekeeper because they can't possibly do the housework with their expensive manicure, and it goes on. But, yeah, I know a couple of blokes who earn, with bonus around $350K a year, who could not lay their hands on a $1000 bucks if they went begging at the bank.

The wifes biggest issue at work is people coming to her for pay advances and having to fcuk them off - something that rarely ever used to happen in the UK. As an FYI for UK residents; unlike the UK where you get paid monthly in the US most get paid fortnightly here because if they were paid monthly they would starve during the last two weeks of the months.

We live a sensible frugal lifestyle here, no cleaner, shop around for everything, don't try to impress the neighbours, and tuck the money away for retirement.

The damn peasants even think they need vacations and air conditioning... The class based system has gone to hell and a hand basket here.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
I reckon if you're in AZ, a person would need A/c.
Serious question: is 2 weeks vacation still standard in the USA?(IMHO, just not long enough!)
 

endure

GCM
I assume being a welfare bum/queen has no social stigma attached to it in the UK?


It has a lot of social stigma attached to it so much so that whole television series are broadcast about it.

Like most television series it's 2% truth and 98% bollocks to draw the audience in.

If you read the Daily Wail/National Enquirer/Fox News you'd assume that the world is going to hell in a handcart.

If you step outside your front door in the morning you realise that the world spins on as normal and what you see in the papers/on the TV is make believe...
 
I can't help thinking if your aim is to be rich you're probably in the wrong industry.

I know I will never make as much money as my dad did. I suspect after tax the old bugger is better off on his pension than I am working full time. In my view that's a price worth paying for a job that I enjoy and makes me feel like I'm doing something useful (most of the time anyway). Plus there's the holidays and basically getting paid to burn stuff.

I also reckon that if you tried being feckless dole scum you'd be bored out of your mind after a few months. I know that after a 6 week summer holiday I'm looking forward to getting back to work.

There's a problem with leaving the education industry too, it's like the Hotel California - once you're in it's very hard to get out, especially on a decent wage, because it means starting at the bottom again and retraining as something else. Most support roles in the sector are also utterly pants and the pay isn't really worth getting out of bed for.

As for being bored, I don't think that would ever happen to me. There's far too many things in the world that interest me and with the internet most of that stuff is free. It also doesn't take a lot to make me happy. Give me a good book, a glass of scotch, a sleeping cat on my lap and some sunshine and I could go on for years.
 

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