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Does working hard still make you rich?

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
The answer to that is - you will never know. You will only know the outcome of the life you live and even then, nothing is altogether stable, until you get nearer the end of the book.

So what you get to choose is, how do I want to be perceived by my friends, family etc? But mostly, how do I want to perceive myself.

But to the point, is it worth it? This question was debated through decades with a lifelong friend, full career S/Sgt...yes, it was worth it, to be what he expected of himself.

He was a thoroughly worthwhile human being, according to the standing room only gathering at his funeral, it is a cliche to say - that was his riches, but it was, so first question now - what do you really mean by rich?

Sorry, edited a bit out. He sounds like a fine man, who made a real, worthwhile difference to people.
 

Dwarf

LE
I'm not sure working hard ever made most people rich. Working 'lucky' or 'smart' or 'being a b@stard', yes.
Or having a good idea like FF above.
 

Polyester

War Hero
The answer to that is - you will never know. You will only know the outcome of the life you live and even then, nothing is altogether stable, until you get nearer the end of the book.

So what you get to choose is, how do I want to be perceived by my friends, family etc? But mostly, how do I want to perceive myself.

But to the point, is it worth it? This question was debated through decades with a lifelong friend, full career S/Sgt whose men would follow him anywhere, the old cliche, well that's what I called him, then put in a couple of decades of civy life, giving a hand-up to worthy young folk and kicking the living doodads out of the unworthy, always a hard working type about whom people gathered like a moth to a flame. But he too felt the burden as you are and wrestled with the paradox of utter contempt for the feckless whilst a little corner wanted to step out of his persona and get paid by society to be a layabout.

A couple of days before his end, with peaceful acceptance as his lot, the old question, your question, was discussed. His answer - hard though it had sometime been to be the person his, kids, wife, oppos, mates and friends expected him to be, there was no other answer than, yes, it was worth it, to be what he expected of himself.

He was a thoroughly worthwhile human being, according to the standing room only gathering at his funeral, it is a cliche to say - that was his riches, but it was, so first question now - what do you really mean by rich?
That’s a great post.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I'm not sure working hard ever made most people rich. Working 'lucky' or 'smart' or 'being a b@stard', yes.
That Sir is a factory worker's point of view! However I agree with the 'working smart' aspect. definitely!
 
For me, you'd have to define rich.

I've had a cracking life, some of it a bit crunchy, some of it easy money and some of it hard graft, I'm a builders labourer, but I'm 62 now, no debt, decent pad, but not much in the bank.

I've got a good circle of proper mates, I'm healthy can turn my hand to most things to keep me occupied and earn a bit of money on the side.

I've never fancied having a helicopter or yacht, I'm stress free and happy with my lot. Does that make rich? In many ways I'm richer than many, so you'd need to define rich.

I have a couple folks who are real millionaires, they burn cash everywhere they go and I'm sure I'm happier than they are.
Like yourself I’ve lost a wife, which secured my financial future, no mortgage, insurance payout, her pension pot being a headteacher was substantial.

I am now after 20+ years in the Royal Airforce Regiment now on a FTRS contract, after leaving.

I do what I want, but what I want when I want and bank my salary.

I also don’t have any kids, couple of issued labradors but the Station Warrant Officer has a softspot for them. So no dramas there.
Am I rich? According to some people yes, but I’d rather have the wife back.

on the upside I am off to join the French in Africa. God must hate me more tha talos.
 
Doing whatever you want, whenever you want to do it, depends entirely on what it is you want to do.
In most cases, if you haven't done it by age 35, it's never going to happen, purely due to the human tendency to be more risk averse with age and experience.
I've lost count of all those people who deferred things until retirement, then died first.

Several mates did minimal time in the forces, had their adventure young, then returned to mundane lives, by some peoples' measure.
Others did full careers, some went on to higher things, some died along the way, some fell through the cracks and ended up in poverty.
Most, though, were happy, rich in their lives of wives, kids, jobs, beer at the weekend, 2 weeks abroad annually, mates, grandkids and retirement for the lucky ones.

Only you know what it is you want to be able to do, patently some wants are more expensive, but generally, decide what your " what" is, then do the minimum work required to achieve it.
Good luck.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
Sorry, edited a bit out. He sounds like a fine man, who made a real, worthwhile difference to people.
Please be my guest, he was indeed, the moment any anecdotes are added there may be people on here who instantly recognise the legend. And that's the point, MENSA level intelligence wrapped in the unlikely robes of a true born hard nut, but internally questioning which path he should have taken. Free beer for life, but no self-respect, or the hard slog and self worth.

Two true dits, posted as PSI to TAVR, as it was, when the powers that be finally decided that this needed to be a meaningful position instead of a last posting resettlement gig.

A mediocre TA WO2 who tried to pass the buck on an exercise cockup his way, was interrupted from holding forth at the post ex gathering in the mess, to be the projectile whose trajectory to the base of the mess steps was oft used in flight calculations thereafter. WO2 HESH 'resigned'. Unit morale and retention increased exponentially.

A very promising young TA volunteer kept deferring the courses that would have helped him reach his potential. The puzzle was solved when he finally confided being functionally illiterate. Going constructively outside his remit, the lad was almost permanently called in, on pay, to do essential 'workshop maintenance'. Which mainly consisted of being taught to read and write. This was far from the only example, there is at least one aeronautical engineer who was coached for her A levels in his private time.

But we are not talking sainthood here, only that there are choices and the results tend to get measured somewhere down the line.
 

ACAB

LE
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.
I've done, since I was 16, 12 years in the Army, 18 years in the Old Bill and 6 years working abroad as a Contractor. I have memories and experiences that your useless friend would pay money for.

And I do not regret a day of it.
 

Teeblerone

Old-Salt
That Sir is a factory worker's point of view! However I agree with the 'working smart' aspect. definitely!

Good point! It certainly reads like that and also 'envy'.

(I've had to change careers twice off the back of someone/several being a 'b@stard'/unlucky. I now have substantially worse working conditions & wages than I did 10 years ago. I could probably be a supermarket submanager & earn more, but it'd be a tough call because I know my job is useful and is quite interesting - and that counts for a lot)
 
I've done, since I was 16, 12 years in the Army, 18 years in the Old Bill and 6 years working abroad as a Contractor. I have memories and experiences that your useless friend would never have the money to pay for.

And I do not regret a day of it.
FOC.
 
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.

You should ask if he has a sister or some lady friends with non existent morals. Then when you get the drippy green dick, you will have something else to occupy your mind.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
That’s a great post.
You are kind to say so, thank you. I do sometimes wonder if my generation represents, at least to some degree, the start of a more noticeable division between instant and deferred gratification that is a deeper divide now for the OP's generation.

The life of a 'doley' is relatively speaking far more comfortable now than it was in the 60s. Soon, as we go through another unemployment spell, fewer will have the choice. If that makes it more respectable as a lifestyle choice, after all, the stereotype doesn't have to be followed if personal standards are maintained, then the stigma will reduce accordingly.

But the OP does draw the distinction parallel between dole and useless self indulgence, and work and reward, which I suppose, spins it back to what is riches?
(and practical issues, such as where will he call home if stepping off the ladder?)
 
Doing whatever you want, whenever you want to do it, depends entirely on what it is you want to do.

I was ill a few years back and had to take a few months off work. The council overpaid my rent on top of JSA so I was earning enough to sit back and relax and even save money.

It was fekin great. I spent my time reading interesting books in the sunshine and having pointless arguments with people on the internet. I downloaded loads of stuff off the net and was able to binge watch Homeland until 4am then stay in bed until noon the next day. I also squandered my time seducing local floozies who I could then poke until the neighbours complained about the smell, after all I didn't have to go to work.

Unfortunately my landlord put the rent up so it all came to an end, I'd put any of the above as better than sitting in the morning commute or typing crap into an excel spreadsheet.

I think the main problem is that jobs don't really pay enough when the temptation to go on the dole is so great. I also used to work in a call centre for minimum wage, who would willingly want to do that?
 
I was ill a few years back and had to take a few months off work. The council overpaid my rent on top of JSA so I was earning enough to sit back and relax and even save money.

It was fekin great. I spent my time reading interesting books in the sunshine and having pointless arguments with people on the internet. I downloaded loads of stuff off the net and was able to binge watch Homeland until 4am then stay in bed until noon the next day. I also squandered my time seducing local floozies who I could then poke until the neighbours complained about the smell, after all I didn't have to go to work.

Unfortunately my landlord put the rent up so it all came to an end, I'd put any of the above as better than sitting in the morning commute or typing crap into an excel spreadsheet.

I think the main problem is that jobs don't really pay enough when the temptation to go on the dole is so great. I also used to work in a call centre for minimum wage, who would willingly want to do that?
I assume being a welfare bum/queen has no social stigma attached to it in the UK?
 
I assume being a welfare bum/queen has no social stigma attached to it in the UK?

It does and that's why I couldn't bring myself to do it. On my last post I was describing a time when I was genuinely ill. The fact the council wouldn't cover my rent when I was severely ill and yet lifelong dolies who have never paid tax get it all for free still annoys me.

Fortunately I'm in far better health now.
 
It does and that's why I couldn't bring myself to do it. On my last post I was describing a time when I was genuinely ill. The fact the council wouldn't cover my rent when I was severely ill and yet lifelong dolies who have never paid tax get it all for free still annoys me.

Fortunately I'm in far better health now.

Well eventually you will climb the social ladder but it does not happen over night. But the welfare bums always stay in the same place regardless, and it might attractive now but is that what you want for any future family you have? It does seem like perhaps the social welfare system is a bit out of check, but those that are dependent on it might get a rude reality check when enough people are tired of supporting certain lifestyles and vote to change things.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.
Only if you are not working for someone else.
 

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