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Does working hard still make you rich?

I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
Life is a bit of a roll of the dice, parenting then motivation and seizing opportunities. Dont envy others, make your life your own and enjoy what you have.

I have said, when asked 'How are you today?' 'Every day I wake up breathing is a good day'.
 
Turn the question around - does being rich mean you have to work hard? I'd suggest given wide swathes of our uber-rich have got their sitting on their arses and watching their parent's property portfolio expand, or watching a previously established company just pay multi-generational dividends, that not necessarily.
 

Polyester

War Hero
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.
I wouldn’t be drawn into his ethic. If you approach hard work with the view to enrichment then you have emotionally invested in a flawed plan. Consider hard work as merely a tool for building resilience and greatness of soul. It helps that it happens to pay the bills.

I’ll bet that bloke is a shell of a man. He’ll die without ever having endured anything which is a frankly pointless existence. In my view anyway.
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
I wouldn’t be drawn into his ethic. If you approach hard work with the view to enrichment then you have emotionally invested in a flawed plan. Consider hard work as merely a tool for building resilience and greatness of soul. It helps that it happens to pay the bills.

I’ll bet that bloke is a shell of a man. He’ll die without ever having endured anything which is a frankly pointless existence. In my view anyway.
The advice of anyone who has Mr Saville as their site picture is worth ignoring
 

Yokel

LE
I wonder how much of it is down to luck - and then Pareto's law applies.

Apart from the, I have a suspicion that the main factor is success in life, in anything from becoming obscenely wealthy or just having a good career, to having a decent social life, or satisfying relationship - comes down largely to connections and reputation.

I am reminded of the very damning slide about promotion in the USAF:

Summary1.jpg
 
From what I have seen it is more luck than hardwork which makes you financially wealthy. I am not saying that hardwork does not make you rich, it is just that over the years of observation I have seen more jammy b'stards climbing out of the dung heap of life smelling of roses than I have seen honest, hardworking schmucks.

I have known some good people who have absolutely no ambition beyond the life they live in which they are very happy and want for nothing more. They are rich in their own way too.

I have also observed that once you have a decent wedge money, or are intelligently willing to risk all you have then you cannot help but make more money if you are not stupid, or over greedy. For example; the wife's boss makes $50 million a year (for himself) from a business that grew out of a favour he did someone 5 years ago, the company is almost worth a $billion and will be very soon. Does it make him rich? He has money, all the toys he could want, he is married, does what he pleases, is also shagging one of the assistants 30 years younger than himself and will doubtless join the billionaire cub in the next 12 months.
 
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FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
There's also the question of working smart. Working for myself, I now earn over three times as much as I did as an employee and I work about a third of the hours. To get to that point, however, I've lost a lot of sleep and, at one point, had to sell the family home. I'm very glad I took the decision I did but it's all about the ability to accept risk, having the confidence to back yourself and enjoying a huge slice of luck.
 

Arte_et_Marte

ADC
Moderator
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.

For me, you'd have to define rich.

I've had a cracking life, some of it a bit crunchy, some of it easy money and some of it hard graft, I'm a builders labourer, but I'm 62 now, no debt, decent pad, but not much in the bank.

I've got a good circle of proper mates, I'm healthy can turn my hand to most things to keep me occupied and earn a bit of money on the side.

I've never fancied having a helicopter or yacht, I'm stress free and happy with my lot. Does that make rich? In many ways I'm richer than many, so you'd need to define rich.

I have a couple folks who are real millionaires, they burn cash everywhere they go and I'm sure I'm happier than they are.
 
There's also the question of working smart. Working for myself, I now earn over three times as much as I did as an employee and I work about a third of the hours. To get to that point, however, I've lost a lot of sleep and, at one point, had to sell the family home. I'm very glad I took the decision I did but it's all about the ability to accept risk, having the confidence to back yourself and enjoying a huge slice of luck.

Naturally I wouldn't want to nick your idea but I certainly think that's the way forward. Do you work yourself as a contractor or sell stuff? Being a contractor enables you to earn more but selling stuff means you don't even have to be there. Having alternate income streams also makes it less important to rely on a main job and having no boss to answer to is a stress free luxury. You also get to rake in all the money.

The problem is trying to balance your time so you can invest in your own business and also to find something that's niche enough to work. Unfortunately covid has put a stop to my own little experiment. I guess I need to up skill and learn new tech or coding, a pity it seems so dull.
 
For me, you'd have to define rich.

I've had a cracking life, some of it a bit crunchy, some of it easy money and some of it hard graft, I'm a builders labourer, but I'm 62 now, no debt, decent pad, but not much in the bank.

I've got a good circle of proper mates, I'm healthy can turn my hand to most things to keep me occupied and earn a bit of money on the side.

I've never fancied having a helicopter or yacht, I'm stress free and happy with my lot. Does that make rich? In many ways I'm richer than many, so you'd need to define rich.

I have a couple folks who are real millionaires, they burn cash everywhere they go and I'm sure I'm happier than they are.

Rich for me would be being able to do what I want whenever I want. Family and friends provide their own source of richness, but how can you enjoy spending time with your family and friends when you're working all the time?

The dolie guy gets to sit on his ass and see/do whatever he wants and if he chooses to he can spend time with his kids. I'll have to pay someone else for child care.
 

cowgoesmoo

Old-Salt
If you've got any ambition or drive you'd be suicidal inside a year living in a dingy bedsit shagging manky tramps and drinking special brew. The grass isn't always greener!
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
I would love to hold the floor and lecture to some on here. Ex servicemen mostly aim far too low for a career.
I have seen real Battle field executives with great managerial skills leave the army and become Church wardens, truck drivers or go to work for a brother's failed business. I have always thought that no one gets rich by working for another, unless they pinch the takings. I went for a niche' market and really went for goal, I used my Mil experience to the full and never looked back. Can't say anymore except that I would do it all over again, and again! and again!
 

Dwarf

LE
Naturally I wouldn't want to nick your idea but I certainly think that's the way forward. Do you work yourself as a contractor or sell stuff? Being a contractor enables you to earn more but selling stuff means you don't even have to be there. Having alternate income streams also makes it less important to rely on a main job and having no boss to answer to is a stress free luxury. You also get to rake in all the money.

The problem is trying to balance your time so you can invest in your own business and also to find something that's niche enough to work. Unfortunately covid has put a stop to my own little experiment. I guess I need to up skill and learn new tech or coding, a pity it seems so dull.
I've worked as an expat for the last 33 years since I stopped wearing DPM, worked for others then set up on my own. Paid off my house 18 months ago, came onto the housing ladder late so a hefty mortgage. Went into partnership and had to take on more debt, but the idea was to see me to retirement., and sell my share in an ongoing business.
Now with covid everything is in the air.

You can work your nuts off and then something pisses on your chips, you never know.

Still I've always tried to educate my students and give them an element to life they didn't have before and I have a reasonably good name in the town. I'm training up some younger teachers to take over from me and they are getting the benefit of my experience which is gratifying to be able to pass on and leave a legacy.
Would I welcome being filthy rich, or exchange it for the having had a positive effect on many young people's lives (not my words)? It would be nice not to have money worries but at the end of the day it's not the measure of the man. I'm happy to be measured by what I've done and how I've managed to help people.

Dad was an old-fashioned family doctor who burned himself out selflessly working for his patients. If I went into the local there was nothing but praise for him from the people he had as patients. That to me is a measure of a man and I have worked hard at trying to come close to dad.
It's not all about the loot.
 

Diogenes' limp

Old-Salt
I like to think I've worked quite hard in my life, although I've also tried to take things easy when I could, I've done every job going from bin man to bar work, digging holes in the road and the corporate yuppie dream in London. I worked as a cleaner in my first job earning peanuts and I worked hard for my A levels and for my degree. I'm also busting my nuts now in the education sector and I can't say I'm enjoying it, though to be totally honest, I've never really enjoyed any work. Given the choice I'd much rather sit on my arse at home.

And there lies the problem, I would love to be a dolie with a made up disease and scrounge off the state. I'd be able to lie in every day and never have to wake up at 6am. There would be zero pressure from deadlines, no terrifying meetings with senior management to justify your existence and no anxiety-provoking bs to deal with from day-to-day work stress.

Every day would be my own to do whatever the fk I like, it would be a perpetual holiday. I would never get bored, there's enough free books and dodgy sites on the internet to entertain me for several lifetimes, as well as cheap hobbies to fill my day.

There's a guy I know who lives just like this, he's about 10 years younger than me and only just 20. He already has two kids from two different girls and doesn't even have to worry about supporting them or raising them so he's already ahead of me in the game of establishing progeny. If I want a kid I'll have to pay shyt loads for child care and then not even see them cos I'll be too busy working.

Meanwhile, this kid has his own private **** palace and can spend the next decade browsing tinder, eating chocolate ice cream in the bath and shagging himself into a coma with the local grotbags. I spent the last decade working my ass off and I've only just got on the housing ladder.

Is it really worth it? Life is so short after all. The only thing stopping me from being a scrounger is that other people would think I'm a skank, secretly though I quite envy the useless bastard.

The answer to that is - you will never know. You will only know the outcome of the life you live and even then, nothing is altogether stable, until you get nearer the end of the book.

So what you get to choose is, how do I want to be perceived by my friends, family etc? But mostly, how do I want to perceive myself.

But to the point, is it worth it? This question was debated through decades with a lifelong friend, full career S/Sgt whose men would follow him anywhere, the old cliche, well that's what I called him, then put in a couple of decades of civy life, giving a hand-up to worthy young folk and kicking the living doodads out of the unworthy, always a hard working type about whom people gathered like a moth to a flame. But he too felt the burden as you are and wrestled with the paradox of utter contempt for the feckless whilst a little corner wanted to step out of his persona and get paid by society to be a layabout.

A couple of days before his end, with peaceful acceptance as his lot, the old question, your question, was discussed. His answer - hard though it had sometime been to be the person his, kids, wife, oppos, mates and friends expected him to be, there was no other answer than, yes, it was worth it, to be what he expected of himself.

He was a thoroughly worthwhile human being, according to the standing room only gathering at his funeral, it is a cliche to say - that was his riches, but it was, so first question now - what do you really mean by rich?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Naturally I wouldn't want to nick your idea but I certainly think that's the way forward. Do you work yourself as a contractor or sell stuff? Being a contractor enables you to earn more but selling stuff means you don't even have to be there. Having alternate income streams also makes it less important to rely on a main job and having no boss to answer to is a stress free luxury. You also get to rake in all the money.

The problem is trying to balance your time so you can invest in your own business and also to find something that's niche enough to work. Unfortunately covid has put a stop to my own little experiment. I guess I need to up skill and learn new tech or coding, a pity it seems so dull.

My idea's un-nickable, you'd have to be me to do what I do, which is both a blessing and a curse (the company is entirely dependent on my know-how, it works only as long as I do and I can't sub-contract).

I get very high value projects, mostly in the energy sector, over the line ,which generally means anything from aligning a Head of State with the strategic value of an enterprise to stopping the locals killing each other or setting a new world record.
 

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