Does visiting a war cemetary or a battlefield make you a "Dark Tourist"?

Well I would say no, at least in the case of those associated with the military.
However the argument was pitched at me by a bunch of university professor types, with Phd's in Tourism Mgt, Psychy stuff etc. I called bollux and said that most research does not include large numbers of serving/ex/closely associated military, and of course got called out.
I am also doing a similiar angle via French and German approaches.
So here is a survey that forms a part of my MSc in Tourism Mgt, which is a bit of a hobby/cheat linking my existing MSC in Mgt to my early retirement plan, but nobody innocent will get hurt.
But I am sure you get the point. If it seems weird it is because the points have already been highlighted in a 11500 word tri-lingual literature review on the subject, and the questions are designed to produce stats.
Any comments by PM please. The Surveymonkey site guarantees completely anonymous responses.

Link to survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/B52YNVL
 
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The_Snail

ADC
RIP
Well I would say no, at least in the case of those associated with the military.
However the argument was pitched at me by a bunch of university professor types, with Phd's in Tourism Mgt, Psychy stuff etc. I called bollux and said that most research does not include large numbers of serving/ex/closely associated military, and of course got called out.
I am also doing a similiar angle via French and German approaches.
So here is a survey that forms a part of my MSc in Tourism Mgt, which is a bit of a hobby/cheat linking my existing MSC in Mgt to my early retirement plan, but nobody innocent will get hurt.
But I am sure you get the point. If it seems weird it is because the points have already been highlighted in a 11500 word tri-lingual literature review on the subject, and the questions are designed to produce stats.
Any comments by PM please. The Surveymonkey site guarantees completely anonymous responses.

Link to survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/B52YNVL

Done.

Q24 didn't have an option for "I shat meself".
 

Datsun 120Y

Old-Salt
For me, there is the regimental family connection and our fallen deserve remembering and our respect. There is also the family connection for some of us and we want to visit where our family fought and fell.

But it's true that Army, serving or ex, have a very different way of thinking and set of priorities than do civvies
 
I know its unfashionable I this day and age, but I would say that when visiting somewhere like Thiepval or Tynecot it instils a great sense of pride in what our recent ancestors achieved.

It seems that victory is no longer something to be celebrated? Only that we should lament the losses?
 

Datsun 120Y

Old-Salt
Which apparently has never been documented in academic research on this topic. Got my Prof's juices really flowing....

There's a subset of the population that thrive on being cold, wet, bored, paid very little, despised by the general population, get fu¢ked around by management and are prepared to get shot at; and academia haven't realised we have a different mindset

How odd
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP
I will consider it for the qualatitive follow up phase.... =-|

I very nearly did pooh my pants at the London Dungeons. I squealed like a little piggy wiggy when the "man" at the gate said "Tickets please".

Fortunately, I was with a 6 foot 4 one of "Them" but it didn't stop me punching him and nacking him in the shin when he was least expecting it.
 
J

JWBenett

Guest
I would think the term - aka Grief tourist - would then apply to millions of people. Mil historians do it a lot, many follow up their research with site visits, a natural progression to help their readers as well as themselves. Serving and ex-serving pay respects for many reasons in several ways, something we would all appreciate? And many researchers and visitors have had military careers.

No doubt grief junkies tour such places but it must get rather depressing. Paying respects to people, or research field visits, shouldn't be indiscriminately labelled 'Dark tourism' .
 

The_Snail

ADC
RIP
@Alsacien I'll try and find my photos of Kanchanaburi and put them on here.

Very humbling.

I also sobbed like a small child when I got back from walking a teeny bit of the Death Railway/Hellfire Pass.

I'm not as tough as people think I am......
 
Not morbidity I think......War graves are the most beautiful resting places......I still think its amazing that they seem so respectful in their silence and I swear that shedding a tear is quite easily achieved.
If I was blindfolded and asked to tell them where I was, I think I could tell them it was a war grave.
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
Dided
 
I have never visited the WW1 areas. I hope to one day. My interest was only piqued after being in the mob myself. My interest in WW2 was only pinged during that also. By that time it was too late for me to ask my grandad.

As a young "whippersnapper" I had no appreciation of what they meant..to me it was just something that was in films. Getting a couple of operational deployments under my belt with first few years in the mob changed my attitude somewhat.
It interests me, lots of stuff I have found out here. I often wonder how, or if I should, inform my son and daughter about it all (2 1/2 & 9 months)
 
I live in the middle of a WWII battlefield, I visited two CWG sites last weekend and a war museum today. How dark does that make me?

Done the survey, but I think you're missing a motivation option. Often I am just fascinated by standing on the ground and trying to imagine how it was at the time. The use of ground, routes in and out, how easy or difficult it was to attack or defend and why that particular spot was the site of a battle in the first place. The museum visits generally correct or expand what I thought I knew beforehand.
 
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