Dodgy Marriage?

#1
Couple lose High Court action over refusal to allow them marry in Ireland

Chaudhry Farooq is a Pakistani national who came to the UK in 2009 on a Student Visa.

Mavra Sajal is a UK national.

The couple met in 2014 and got married in an Islamic religious ceremony in Manchester in February 2015 but did not seek to have the marriage entered on the UK register of civil marriages. In June 2015 they came to Ireland and applied to be married in a Civil Ceremony. The registrar refused to marry them on what appears to be a technicality and the couple went to the High Court which upheld the registrar's decision. I can see this one heading to the Supreme Court.

I've been married 34 years and back in the dim and distant past we all got married in a church. In 1984 there was probably a Mosque in Dublin and that was it. Civil ceremonies presumably happened but we never heard of them. Back then the Priest performed the religious ceremony and also acted as registrar. The happy couple signed the civil register in the church. Fast forward to 2018 and it occurs to me that I don't actually know what happens these days. A quick google and it turns out that since 2007 anyone marrying in Ireland (Irish citizen or a foreign national) must give 3 months' notification in person to any Registrar. The Registrar issues you with a Marriage Registration Form (MRF) authorising you to get married. You give it to the person (Priest, Imam, Rabbi or whoever) who will be solemnising your marriage. Following the marriage ceremony, the completed MRF should be given to a Registrar, within one month of the marriage ceremony so that the marriage can be registered.

On the face of it, the marriage in question appears to me to be one of convenience so that Mr. Farooq can stay in the UK. Just another scam along the lines of the one in the Irish Headline of the Day thread. You have to question why the marriage wasn't registered in the UK.
 
Last edited:

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#2
Here's your answer - "Because Mr Farooq could not go with her because he was ineligible for a visa to re-enter the UK".
You are probably right about the marriage of convenience as it states that he applied for a visa extension to complete an MBA, nothing about whether he'd got it, therefore possibly illegal. By popping over to the Emerald Isle, they thought that they might get away with the civil ceremony which would then make him legal. Well done to both registrar and judge!
 
#3
Here's your answer - "Because Mr Farooq could not go with her because he was ineligible for a visa to re-enter the UK".
You are probably right about the marriage of convenience as it states that he applied for a visa extension to complete an MBA, nothing about whether he'd got it, therefore possibly illegal. By popping over to the Emerald Isle, they thought that they might get away with the civil ceremony which would then make him legal. Well done to both registrar and judge!
Presumably they couldn't legally marry in the UK then which leads us to question why the religious ceremony took place in Manchester.
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#4
Presumably they couldn't legally marry in the UK then which leads us to question why the religious ceremony took place in Manchester.
Muslims, innit bruv!
 
#5
What's the procedure for getting legally married in the UK?
 
#6
This goes on daily in both the UK and within the EU. The switched on Registrars can sniff them out and refuse the marriage of convenience. However as in every walk of life not everyone is switched on or in the very rare case part of these scams.
It will go to whatever court it can,more than likely with some form of public funding. We know the high courts have judges who decide on these cases depending on their own views,use laws to the extreme in interperation.
He failed to either get the correct visa or used a student visa without actually being a student. There are so many cases of fraudulant 'Student' visa misuse and these colleges/so called universities being nothing more than a PO Box.
So well done Eire on having a switched on Registrar now send him back and investigate to poor(paid no doubt) bride 'Allegadly' ofcourse
 
#7
Presumably they couldn't legally marry in the UK then which leads us to question why the religious ceremony took place in Manchester.
Same way as it does in France

In France You must get married at the Registrars after that you can have a religious ceremony
Practitioners of a particular faith insist on religious 1st then visit the registrar * However many of them dont bother with the registry office** at all and so technically despite the religious ceremony aren't married.
Again Blind eye was turned and of course as many other practitioners of said religion work in the various benefits offices it appears a certain religions weddings were deemed acceptable. (They have serious fraud and identity theft issues in these departments - not all just those with a large immigrant population - coincidentally of course - no connection nothing to see here move along please.


All this came to a screaming halt after the bacalan attack - when France decided it was going to keep better tabs on certain groups and ensure they played by the rules - Cue howls of racism when Mohammed had his benefits cut because in fact his wife wasn't his wife in law and so he wasn't eligible to claim for her.



*To be honest I think most (sensibly) turned a blind eye since as long as its the same day does it really matter

**Its the Mairie rather than a registrars
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#8
What's the procedure for getting legally married in the UK?
I got married last year for the 2nd time. I had to go to the registry office and give notice of date of intending to marry, a couple of weeks later we then had to attend an interview, with copies of my divorce papers, was asked a few questions about W-T-B and she about me, paid over the deposit and date was set in their books for a year later.
 
#12
...In France You must get married at the Registrars after that you can have a religious ceremony
Practitioners of a particular faith insist on religious 1st then visit the registrar * However many of them dont bother with the registry office** at all and so technically despite the religious ceremony aren't married.
Again back in the 80s, I remember a gentleman of mature years toddling off to the Labour Exchange to claim Unemployment. He pulled out the paperwork for his missus and was shaken to be told that his Church Marriage Cert had no legal basis and he needed to get his civil certificate. Possibly he was unaware that such a thing as a civil certificate of marriage existed.
 
#13
Well done Dublin. Keep it up and we won't build a wall on the boarder. (well so long as we can save 12p per litre on diesel).
We're going to have to talk about dodgy Brits coming down here to get wed. :D
 
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