Doctorate

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
Doctorate in Defense, Security and Development

Looks a cracking programme and would feed an interest, but any use in a military context for promotion and furthering oneself?
 
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Which university? (I suspect a US one). Famous alumni?Well-known staff? Course entry requirements? Course academic requirements (a Doctorate is normally 3 - 5 years)?

Give us more detail...
 
Doctorate in Defense, Security and Development

Looks a cracking programme and would feed an interest, but any use in a military context for promotion and furthering oneself?

Promotion for whom, officers , WOs or JNCOs?

.........."Good Morning Cpl Botter, you have failed all modules on your CLM and never passed a fitness test but luckily for you, your doctorate in defense, security and development means we can promote you to Sergeant with immediate effect"..........
 

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
Non specific, general question. Is it useful or even valued.. Obviously level of Section Commander, methinks maybe not :).

Crash, to specific. Idea is not to do it for a specific post, e.g. Defense Strategy Lecturer at Staff College/Sandhurst but more generally is it valued?

e.g. Without details, almost every Col. I am working with here has Phd and is valued-expected to have this level. Not needed !!! But sort of expected.
 
Is it a real PhD program (a period of study intended to turn an individual into an independent scholar, with the end result a significant and unique contribution to the sum of human knowledge...) or one based on prior learning?
 

Blogg

LE
Cranfield I presume?

If so the answer is potentially yes but only if your CoC sees the value.

Otherwise one for longer term CV
 

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
The former, as per 'normal' with all the normal expectations of seminars, defense of thesis, publications etc etc. Yes, I know time intensive (5yrs part time) and a ball ache.

Did not know you could get one for prior learning outside of 'Honorary', are they Walt Disney Uni ??
 
The former, as per 'normal' with all the normal expectations of seminars, defense of thesis, publications etc etc. Yes, I know time intensive (5yrs part time) and a ball ache.

Did not know you could get one for prior learning outside of 'Honorary', are they Walt Disney Uni ??


I get occasional FB adverts/or emails on prior learning based PhDs, I think usually offered by US universities. Which is kind of annoying seeing as I'm now in the 4th year of a full time PhD. (Although the overrunning may explain why I never made it to the dizzy heights of section commander).
 

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
The chaps I am with at mo, here all have it, as I say it is sort of expected. However, they said to me to do it here with them. I can dedicate a fair bit of time for it during the 'working day' and it relates to what I am doing. Most Lt.Col's here do it as part of there program across all services and police. It is a kind offer but unsure what real benefit apart from the ego thing and the chance to really get inside how things are done here.

How is yours and do the CoC value it?
 
Oh sorry I wasn't clear. I left the army in 2005 as a Sapper (equiv of private) so this is nothing to do with the army, although my supervisor served as a medic in the Italian Army and his wife did seven years in the Israeli (she's in the same lab). Though I do seem to be getting occasional "add me requests" on Linkedin from Officers in my old regiment who don't seem to have any other enlisted guys as contacts, so that might mean something.

However in terms of broad experiences that might be useful to somebody considering doing a PhD, I can say, its the hardest thing I have ever done, mentally. Emotionally one of the most turbulent experiences a person can undertake, with many more downs than ups, but the ups (usually when something clicks, or works, or you have taught yourself to do something you didn't you were capable of doing) are what make the suffering the downs worth it. Often I feel like I'm intellectually not good enough, and I've had several bouts where I've just wanted to jack it in all together. Apparently these are typical PhD-student experiences. The most rewarding part so far is how far I've developed intellectually (mine is a biology-based PhD, which is also heavy on maths and computer programming) as I'm now capable of doing things I would never have imagined a fw years ago.

It's also a very solitary/lonely experience, as nearly all of your available time is dedicated to your subject - if you're not actively working on it, you are usually thinking about it (apparently most of the best ideas are formed whilst showering!.

I can say though, that if you're only motivation to undertake a PhD is for the status-points, then that probably wouldn't get you very far to completion. Most people I know who are doing a PhD are doing for some other reason, such as wanting to prove something to themselves, using it to go for an academic career etc, and I think personal motivation is also one of the key things potential supervisors look for in a student (I personally think motivation is more important than smarts).

***Also sorry if any bits are incoherent but I'm using this to procrastinate so I'm flipping between ARRSE and some data analysis I'm presently doing.
 
Actually reading again, if you will have time during the working day to work on this, and you are passionate about finding out more about the way things are done, then I'd say go for it if the other stuff I've mentioned sounds bearable.
 

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
:) Should say I did 16 months of a PhD in Organic CHem... weyyyyyyyy back and terminated for the reasons you clearly set out. Tis true.

This is different as it is with the team I am working with and 3 of us would do it together (slacking of during the day for 'non' officially approved time to get it done. It will help build bridges here with the general staff and insert me where I need to be. I am aware of the extra work though and do not know how valued it would be, upon my return.

All info and thoughts appreciated though.
 
I get occasional FB adverts/or emails on prior learning based PhDs, I think usually offered by US universities. Which is kind of annoying seeing as I'm now in the 4th year of a full time PhD. (Although the overrunning may explain why I never made it to the dizzy heights of section commander).
The US is the world's leader in degree mills* so anyone considering this route should think long and hard before handing over any cash. Remember, kiddies, if it takes no effort to achieve then it's probably worthless.



*Anyone after an insight into accreditation for prior experience should google 'Colby Nolan, MBA'.
 
Well, the fact you can 'earn' a PhD from them with absolutely no effort whatsoever should speak volumes...
 

Black Sheep

Old-Salt
To be fair it sounds like the sort of ethos that most people in the civil service have built their careers on.
 

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