Doctor ACF

Doc Badger

Clanker
Apologies if this has been asked before, I did a search and nothing came up.

I am a doctor who has been employed in the Army Reserve for over ten years now. I have become a little disillusioned with it - since Herrick finished there doesn’t really seem to be much point to it all. So I have been considering leaving and doing something else.

As a way of paying it forward, I’ve been considering the ACF as I was in as a cadet a long time ago. Has anyone come across a doctor in the ACF before? I was wondering what kind of work they’re normally put to? Are they tasked with running a Med Centre at annual camp or are they typically employed in the usual AI role? I don’t recall ever seeing a doctor at a camp when I was there as a cadet or as a private attached from a TA unit.

I’d be happy to do either, I just would like to know before I approach them, particularly as I haven’t made up my mind yet.
 

Boxy

GCM
I’ve had Drs as students on their induction course who have been slated to be a normal adult instructor (for a measure of normal)

But realistically I can see you being pegged for Medical Support Officer

Which is kinda like a medical advisor at the higher levels
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
As a Medical Support Officer you would have 'hands on' first line support to the cadets at annual camp, probably any battalion events throughout the year and offer medical advice. I think you would find it worthwhile, especially with cadets from the lower end of society and what makes them tick. You would need to accept that your duties may be of a high end nurse.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
As a Medical Support Officer you would have 'hands on' first line support to the cadets at annual camp, probably any battalion events throughout the year and offer medical advice. I think you would find it worthwhile, especially with cadets from the lower end of society and what makes them tick. You would need to accept that your duties may be of a high end nurse.
Just like this man, acting Major van Tam.

 
Just like this man, acting Major van Tam.

A very good man - he is the only one of the myriad of professors and so-called 'experts' that the media drag up who not only knows what he is talking about, but also puts it across in a way that the ordinary person can understand. Not like the majority of professors that appear to be mesmerised by their '15 minutes of fame' by trying to scare the sh!t out of us and are reluctant to get back in their boxes and let us get on with our lives.
 
I’d be happy to do either, I just would like to know before I approach them, particularly as I haven’t made up my mind yet.

Equally, please do ak yourself what you would be happiest doing. If the County/Sector you are applying to join is short of a Medical Support Officer, they may well try and steer you in that direction, but if they already have one, what do you want to do with you spare time?

It's a similar quandry that many Reservists face - do you want your time in green to be an extension of your day job, or a total break from your day job?

As an MSO, you are likely to find yourself doing the following duties:
  • Advise the county Cadet Commandant on all matters relating to healthcare and welfare for all members of the ACF whilst on ACF training and activities
  • Advise and assist Detachments and ACF Area HQs on the provision of qualified first aid personnel during activities
  • Liaise with the Planning Officer and Training Safety Advisor (TSA) on the completion of Medical Planning documents.
  • In conjunction with the CEO organise appropriate medical support, facilities and equipment for all county activities inc. annual camps
  • Form part of the camp recce and liaise with local medical and hospital facilities
  • Ensure medical information for all members of the County are check and updated on Westminster.
  • Liaise with CFATO to ensure that there are appropriately trained first aiders to comply with risk assessments in all fixed based locations and on other ACF activities
  • Liaise with CQM on any stores and equipment required
  • Undertake any other Medical Support related task as directed by the Cadet Commandant
  • Attend an annual Medical Support Officers conference
However, as an Instructor, you'll find yourself delivering cool Army style stuff for kids.

What would you rather do?
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
@Alan Partridge

Would there not be an opportunity to do both? While annual camp is the highlight of each year, there are the weekends and mid-week evening sessions where he could do the 'cool army stuff' leaving the advice element to be slotted in. Also, attending an annual camp could mean a morning sick parade then a day on the ranges, or map reading or adventure training - whatever is scheduled to be carried out by the Cadets. I am sure that an interesting and worthwhile balance could easily be worked out.
 
If you a full blown bona fide Doctor. Each county is scaled to have one.

If you want to join as a Doctor or CFAV type, then it is likely to be different.

Tasks, New CFAV medicals, take on the role of Medical Support Officer, if they come to camp, then yes run the med centre.

Best bet would be to get in touch with your nearest County and speak to the CEO about yourself.
 
@Alan Partridge

Would there not be an opportunity to do both? While annual camp is the highlight of each year, there are the weekends and mid-week evening sessions where he could do the 'cool army stuff' leaving the advice element to be slotted in. Also, attending an annual camp could mean a morning sick parade then a day on the ranges, or map reading or adventure training - whatever is scheduled to be carried out by the Cadets. I am sure that an interesting and worthwhile balance could easily be worked out.

There is always the chance to do extra - our Padre, for example, is a dab hand at map reading, but like the Medical Support Officer role, it's always a case of attending as and when their primary duties allow.

Plus there's always an unforeseen medical or welfare emergency when you have 400 young people on a camp, so the staff running the activity can't count those roles being present for safety ratios or instructional duties - but of course, they are very welcome to lend a hand if they can!
 

Dredd

LE
@Alan Partridge

Would there not be an opportunity to do both? While annual camp is the highlight of each year, there are the weekends and mid-week evening sessions where he could do the 'cool army stuff' leaving the advice element to be slotted in. Also, attending an annual camp could mean a morning sick parade then a day on the ranges, or map reading or adventure training - whatever is scheduled to be carried out by the Cadets. I am sure that an interesting and worthwhile balance could easily be worked out.

Certainly.

The MSO is not a "full time" position - it can easily be done as well as an Instructor role or any of the others.

All you need to be careful of is not allowing double-hatting become triple, or quadruple. Even if believed to be temporary to help out, with the best of intentions. For that way madness lies.
 

diverman

LE
Book Reviewer
A very good man - he is the only one of the myriad of professors and so-called 'experts' that the media drag up who not only knows what he is talking about, but also puts it across in a way that the ordinary person can understand. Not like the majority of professors that appear to be mesmerised by their '15 minutes of fame' by trying to scare the sh!t out of us and are reluctant to get back in their boxes and let us get on with our lives.
Also his reactions at government briefings is so different when he answers questions from thepublic and from so called journalists. With the public he‘s very clear and concise and very human as if you were next to him in a pub but with the journalists he’s almost scornful in a professional way.
 
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A very good man - he is the only one of the myriad of professors and so-called 'experts' that the media drag up who not only knows what he is talking about, but also puts it across in a way that the ordinary person can understand. Not like the majority of professors that appear to be mesmerised by their '15 minutes of fame' by trying to scare the sh!t out of us and are reluctant to get back in their boxes and let us get on with our lives.

Given that this chap is from Boston, it comes as no surprise that his explanations are pitched at the level that they are. The area is over populated with inbred simpletons.
 
I also seem to recall. A local GP was a doctor in the County. But when they went to camp, he couldn't be as a GP as he wasn't licensed in that area, or something similar...
 

Talon

Old-Salt
As mentioned, the only real role I can see is MSO. ACFs do not really run a "med centre" on annual camps anymore. Injuries and whatnot are dealt with via hospitals and minor injuries units. If a cadet ill to be training (beyond maybe a temporary headache) they will likely be sent home from camp.

You could of course just be a regular CFAV?
 
The term med centre is like the NAAFI in the ACF, not real. But the term is recognised. Med centre is where the MSO and welfare hide, also a point to take all poorly (Physically or mentally) cadets. so the rest of the world can get on with the other cadets. But as mentioned, anything that stops the cadet from carrying on, off they go home.
 
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