Do You Still Have The Same Accent?

#1
More a question for Corps trickle-posting type soldiers rather than Inf blokes who stay largely with punters from the same county as them I suppose...

So, do you still have the same accent you had prior to joining the mob?

I've been in 20 years and like to think I've still got the same accent, I dont reckon I pronounce any words differently or have picked up the dreaded neutral "squaddie accent" (says "fook" instead of "fuck" etc)

Only thing is when I do go home my mother reckons I speak slower for a few days and when I get back to work the troops reckon I speak a lot quicker!!

I do get picked up for the odd phrase like "gleaming", "dobra", "mint" and the current favourite and bad habit; saying "yeah,yeah,yeah" really quickly when agreeing with someone but thats a bit different than completely losing an accent.
 

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#2
Ashamedly, I used to share a mess with two scousers and I picked up a few words, 'fook' and 'boss' being notable examples. (I was only 16 and very impressionable).

My dad, uncles and friends beat me mercilessly until I could speak proper again. 'Say again' and 'gleaming' still slip out quite a bit which makes me cringe.
 
#3
Was in a room full of Geordies as a recruit back in the early 80's, so went home full of 'canny' and 'wi eye man' and was accused of talking funny. Conversely it was noticeable that my home accent came back after a couple of weeks at home.
 
#4
I thought so until I was called a soft English poof, but it was ok I stuck the heed on him and my Ayrshire accent came flooding back "Ken"
 
#5
No, as I have lived in several different parts of the UK and spent several years abroad, my accent, especially as a child, would adjust to the locals (not getting picked on for having a different accent was a survival tachnique as a child). On my return to London, having spent a couple of years in Glasgow, people thought I was a Scot, I had picked up not just the accent but used much of their colloquialisms as well, piece instead of sandwich, ham instead of bacon, heavy instead of bitter etc!
So my accent today is fairly neutral but will adjust to my surrounds without any concious effort on my part!
 
#7
Aye, ah do as ah say, and give nowt away. If 'owt after leavin' mi accent 'as got broader. Many, many years ago when on leave I used to attract young lasses 'cos they thought I talked posh. Common as fuckin' muck now.
 
#8
In my old Bn (1 R ANG) and during my time in we had geordies, scousers, jocks (not attached arms). In the main they retained their strong accents, despite the fact that the majority of soldiers in the Bn were spud munching bumpkins from the east of England, whilst I, on the other hand, had a slightly more flamboyant accent (a bit Brummie) due to the fact that I came from gods own county of Northamptonshire! I did however on courses, postings, deployments etc did encounter people from the regions who obviously had their accents flattened and softened. The wierdest one though was an SASC tosser who had a southern Irish accent with a massive Brummie twang (he was a former R IRISH RANGER).
 
#10
From the Blackcountry to South Yorkshire. Im even confusing me sen!
 
L

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#13
Born in scotland, raised in rural Northumberland, served with cockney poofters. Now live in Greater Manchester, accent's the same as Northumbrian but with Jockanese and Lankysheer words stuck in there.
 
#14
Vat a ridiculush queshtion, but yesh..
 
#16
I think it's fair to say that there is an accent that is specifically Army, and i'm not referring to the lingo we all share. When you serve with lads from all over the country it's bound to happen. As soon as leave kicked in, i'd have people saying "ooh don't you talk posh you"? Of course i didn't, and this would rectify itself after a few pints, and the local vernacular would reassert itself...But not i hasten to add, with any of the nasal Gallagherism's, such as Top one, Nice one or Sorted! That kind of forced Manc Mongism doesn't reflect the accents of any Mancunians i actually know here in Manchester. I like to think that i speak with a clear Manchester accent, which has a touch of Lancastrian added...So my accent didn't take too long to come back.
 
#17
when we reported for training waaay back in the sixties all the lads came from all over, the regional accents were nigh on alien sounding. we couldn't understand each other, I suppose we didn't have the benefit of Tv and radio so much like today,all the accents today are watered down, In saying that where I have lived for forty years they say I still have a strong welsh accent....but when I go over to wales they think I speak norn iron.

there now I'm sure you all found that interesting.

How do I get smileys on this new site???
 
#18
Having spent the first couple of years away from Paisley with people nodding wide eyed and open mouthed at me. I had to start speaking slowly and more pronounced, Otherwise I was going to starve. I then Got home to my sister saying I sounded like a poof.

English people can still tell I'm a Jock and people in Glasgow think I'm uber posh, until I start drinking.
 
#19
Sadly, or not, I no longer have a brummie accent. Having lived in Worcestershire for over 30 years, I now have their accent. My brothers who still live in Brum have kept their accents.
 
#20
No, as I have lived in several different parts of the UK and spent several years abroad, my accent, especially as a child, would adjust to the locals (not getting picked on for having a different accent was a survival tachnique as a child). On my return to London, having spent a couple of years in Glasgow, people thought I was a Scot, I had picked up not just the accent but used much of their colloquialisms as well, piece instead of sandwich, ham instead of bacon, heavy instead of bitter etc!
So my accent today is fairly neutral but will adjust to my surrounds without any concious effort on my part!
Ditto, although I have tried very hard NOT to pick up the local accent.

My ex was a Scouser (ish, from Skelmersdale really), when I met him he'd been in the RE for 4 years and had mostly lost the accent. I only really noticed it when we went to his parents on leave and he knocked about with his civvy mates, then everything sped up. Mind you, that might have been due to the drugs...
 

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