Do you folks have any equivalent to a"1st Amendment Audit" in the UK??

#1
Long story short we have had a member of the public walk into several government buildings and enter a military installation and record the entire process. In what is termed a "1st Amendment Audit"... Exercising the right of free speech of course but also making many folks pretty nervous about having a stranger enter a building and recording everything they come across. Do you have folks that pull these kinds of stunts your way and if so what is the process to deal with them? This has caused a rethink of security protocols here, because quite frankly nobody is used to this kind of shite behavior.

The videos are pretty boring but the guy is just really trying to provoke a law enforcement response.

First Amendment audits - Wikipedia

wyoming audit - YouTube

 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#3
#4
Not really. There's the offence of Trespass on a Designated Site contrary to Section 128 of the Serious Organised Crime Act 2005. Some of these sites you can get access as a member of public (eg parliament has viewing galleries I think; you can visit parts of Buckingham Palace), but you can't just bimble in because you're a British subject.

-Edit-
To forestall the next question, designated sites include places like Parliament, Buckingham Palace, and various governmental and military places. Also Nuclear sites.
 
#5
I know I could find this out by searching but I don't want to have to wade through the crazy people's ranting.

What is the point of this and how is it relevant to the first amendment? What's the link between freedom of speech and wandering around government buildings?
 
#7
Any bloke just barging in to a government or military compound without authorisation needs a firm finger jabbed in the sternum. For that matter, any damn place they aren't authorised. Not a customer or employee, not covered by insurance - out they go pronto.
 
#8
I know I could find this out by searching but I don't want to have to wade through the crazy people's ranting.

What is the point of this and how is it relevant to the first amendment? What's the link between freedom of speech and wandering around government buildings?
To try and see what kind of response they will get from employee's and Law Enforcement. They do this to draw attention and actually "grade" the responses they get. Publicity stunt that has the potential to very badly.
 
#9
To try and see what kind of response they will get from employee's and Law Enforcement. They do this to draw attention and actually "grade" the responses they get. Publicity stunt that has the potential to very badly.
Ah, morons.
 
#10
To try and see what kind of response they will get from employee's and Law Enforcement. They do this to draw attention and actually "grade" the responses they get. Publicity stunt that has the potential to very badly.
"I'm here to do a 1A audit!"
"In you go, sir."
"Let me just adjust my waistcoat." BOOM!
 
#12
In answer to the thread title Jonesy, no.

Anywhere you can’t go into is protected by law or statutory instrument (same as law but easier to pass - e.g the Aldershot and District Military Areas SI.).

In the U.K. they could have expected a more robust response. Well, at least before phone cameras, it’s more polite now.

Have you shaved your beard off ?
 
#13
In answer to the thread title Jonesy, no.

Anywhere you can’t go into is protected by law or statutory instrument (same as law but easier to pass - e.g the Aldershot and District Military Areas SI.).

In the U.K. they could have expected a more robust response. Well, at least before phone cameras, it’s more polite now.

Have you shaved your beard off ?
Trimmed it down, not shaved it off though.
 
#14
No we don't have a First Amendment Audit; indeed we don't have a First Amendment. For a very simple reason...


...we don't have a written constitution, therefore you wont get nutters trying exploit their perceived Constitutional rights.

Easy. Anyway we have train spotters. And their films are more interesting than this rubbish.
 
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#15
There is or was some chimp here in the UK - who used to go bothering military installations especially ones that aren't on maps or sign posted .

He would turn up take photos - demand to know why he couldn't - try to enter ( but by door not over fence) protest at being turned away.

He had you tube videos
 
#16
Unlike yourselves we don't have a constitution in the UK, so there is no bill of rights and we are subject to the will of her majesty the Queen who theoretically can do want she wants with us all - hence the term British subjects as opposed to US citizens.

However, over the centuries practically all of the monarch's powers have been negotiated away in order for them to maintain their wealth, and position on the throne. Their role is now largely symbolic.

The rights we do have come to us through laws passed in Parliament - known as Statue Law (law made by Governments) and Common Law (law established by someone bringing a case to court). These are continuously evolving unlike the US constitution which is largely static (it seems).

And perhaps that is the difference between the US and UK; America was founded on a set of principals that should an enable a man or woman to rise to the maximum of their capabilities, whereas in Britain all we ask is that you don't be a nuisance to your neighbour....
 
#17
The Russians tried entering a military base in the UK not that long ago but were given swift marching order to FRO and go look at a cathedral instead
 

Bagl0ck

On ROPS
On ROPs
#18
Unlike yourselves we don't have a constitution in the UK, so there is no bill of rights and we are subject to the will of her majesty the Queen who theoretically can do want she wants with us all - hence the term British subjects as opposed to US citizens.

However, over the centuries practically all of the monarch's powers have been negotiated away in order for them to maintain their wealth, and position on the throne. Their role is now largely symbolic.

The rights we do have come to us through laws passed in Parliament - known as Statue Law (law made by Governments) and Common Law (law established by someone bringing a case to court). These are continuously evolving unlike the US constitution which is largely static (it seems).

And perhaps that is the difference between the US and UK; America was founded on a set of principals that should an enable a man or woman to rise to the maximum of their capabilities, whereas in Britain all we ask is that you don't be a nuisance to your neighbour....
Excellent post
 
#19
Talking of Freedom of Speech, try walking into a police station and telling the copper on the desk "I have a cat under my coat" and you're good to go. However, tell him "I have a bomb under my coat" and you're in for a rough ride. We all like to bleat about Freedom of Speech but it really is just an urban myth. :cool:
 
#20
Talking of Freedom of Speech, try walking into a police station and telling the copper on the desk "I have a cat under my coat" and you're good to go. However, tell him "I have a bomb under my coat" and you're in for a rough ride. We all like to bleat about Freedom of Speech but it really is just an urban myth. :cool:
But yet a pregnant woman can walk into a police station and ask to piss in a policeman's helmet, and no one would bat an eyelid
 

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