Do we have Flamethrowers in our inventory?

#41
Frankly I'm surprised that the yanks don't have loads of these because of their "Right To Bear Arms" mindset, Also that we haven't heard yet of one being used to carry out one of their "going postal" killing sprees...
You dont need one . One of the biggest mass murders in US History was done by a Illegal alien Cuban in the Bronx with US$ 1.50 of gasoline. Happy land disco fire

87 dead in 1990


Not a gun in sight nor need for a flamethrower
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#42
On the History Channel, there's a show called "Brothers In Arms", 2 ex US Forces bods set up a gun shop where they repair/alter all kinds of kit. One episode shows a customer bowling in with a WW2 flamethrower and he wants it refurbished. The job gets done, tanks cleaned and repaired, hose changed and the gun set up, one very happy customer.
 
#43
Forgotten Weapons did a talk and demo of a US WW2 flamethrower, here:


It is apparent from the demo that you have to be too damn close to the target for comfort.
Standard US tactic in WW2 was called "Blowtorch and Corkscrew"

a Flamethrower team of 2 men (Gunner and refill carrier)
a Demo team of 2 with pole or satchel charges of TNT blocks
2 BAR teams to suppress enemy fires

the BARS (and machineguns if available) suppressed the openings and using concealment and smoke the flamethrower team got close and let fly, when done the Demo teams emplaced explosives and destroyed the position
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#44
If I recall correctly, I read somewhere that 1 R HAMPS had one during the Malayan Emergency. Apparently it was recovered from a museum somewhere and the put to good use by the Battalion APTC sergeant.
Apparently correct, various regimental histories give this as the wartime role for the senior gym queen!
 
#45
The last UK manportable flame thrower was called the "Ack Pack" although often referred to as "The lifebuoy" because of its toroidal shape. The toroidal tank held the fuel, usually thickened petrol (i.e. napalm) and had a central spherical gas tank charged with nitrogen.

The handpiece consisted of a double handed projector. The rear trigger controlled the fuel valve and the front trigger operated the igniter device. The Igniter consisted of a ring of modified .303 cartridges in a carrier round the nozzle of the projector. Operating the front trigger fired one of the cartridges which would produce a flame for a number of seconds. Releasing the trigger rotated a new igniter cartridge into position. By separating fuel flow from ignition, the operator could decide whether to fire fuel or flame. The taught procedure was to soak the target in fuel first and then ignite it with a flame burst. Projecting fuel was almost silent and difficult to pick up where it was coming from. A pencil of flame was slightly more obvious, and likely to provoke a reaction!

Flamethrower, Portable, No 2 - Wikipedia

Fun Fact.. the name "Napalm" comes from "Sodium Palmitate" which is the chemical name for the soft soap added to hydrocarbon to make it into a gel. (For the chemically naive "Na" is the chemical symbol for sodium.) Soaps are made by reacting an alkali (such as sodium hydroxide) with a fat.. (Palm oil in this case). Soaps work because the molecule has a water loving end (the sodium) and a water hating end (the oily bit). The soap molecules work by surrounding the (usually greasy) dirt particles with their oily ends, leaving the water loving ends point out to allow them to disperse in the cleaning water. In Napalm, the reaction is similar in that the hydrocarbon molecules are held in a gel matrix. Gelled hydrocarbon performs better ballistically as it holds together in larger lumps and does not disperse in a fine mist. It also sticks to "surfaces" (other targets available)!
 
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#51
individual usage
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please I know a few rqms's who might have minor breakdowns as soon as chits come in for flame throwers
and the odd 1,000 gallons of agent orange/ddt can see london district/salisbury plain going brown
 
#53
Fun Fact.. the name "Napalm" comes from "Sodium Palmitate" which is the chemical name for the soft soap added to hydrocarbon to make it into a gel. (For the chemically naive "Na" is the chemical symbol for sodium.) Soaps are made by reacting an alkali (such as sodium hydroxide) with a fat.. (Palm oil in this case). Soaps work because the molecule has a water loving end (the sodium) and a water hating end (the oily bit). The soap molecules work by surrounding the (usually greasy) dirt particles with their oily ends, leaving the water loving ends point out to allow them to disperse in the cleaning water. In Napalm, the reaction is similar in that the hydrocarbon molecules are held in a gel matrix. Gelled hydrocarbon performs better ballistically as it holds together in larger lumps and does not disperse in a fine mist. It also sticks to "surfaces" (other targets available)!
I read somewhere that we developed something similar in parallel - a fuel for flamethrowers, that is - but napalm became more common because it had the catchier name.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#55
Operation Fougasse


For those who like their Nazis well done
The defensive fougasse was still in one of the RE pamphlets when I did my training but it wasn't taught as a subject
 
#57
The defensive fougasse was still in one of the RE pamphlets when I did my training but it wasn't taught as a subject
I vaguely remember being told about them in a talk about improvised defence's.
Dug in fuel drum and claymore iirc.
Long time ago and I was struggling to stay awake during death by powerpoint
 
#58
During WW2 there was a whole department dedicated to developing fun things to do with Petroleum Product..

They came up with some quite bizarre toys, including the FIDO anti fog landing system, and quite a good liquid fuel rocket motor, designed by Dr Issac Lubbock..

Petroleum Warfare Department - Wikipedia
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#59
I vaguely remember being told about them in a talk about improvised defence's.
Dug in fuel drum and claymore iirc.
Long time ago and I was struggling to stay awake during death by powerpoint
Mine was before PPT thankfully, in fact before the army discovered word processors.
The original defensive one indeed was based on an oil drum with a ply disc separating the lifting charge from the fuel mix and 83 grenade.
I would love to have seen one fired from the defenders point of view!
 

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