Do the British Army still use Mules as transport ?

#62
Showing my age here but I seem to recall that for every section of 4 mules one would be needed to carry the food for them. This would be even worse in anything other than temperate conditions because a second of the 4 would be needed to carry water. Thus whilst they might provide a logistic capability they were in themselves a significant logistic burden.

Bactrian camels would have been a much better choice.

Amazing what you remember from way back.
I have a vague memory of the train requirement to move an Infantry Battalion and a Cavalry Regiment. It's a bit hazy but it was something like one train to move a Bn and three for a Regt plus a train a day for food. I think those number are a bit off but collective will get the point. Animals are lovely but they take a lot to look after.
 
#64
I have a vague memory of the train requirement to move an Infantry Battalion and a Cavalry Regiment. It's a bit hazy but it was something like one train to move a Bn and three for a Regt plus a train a day for food. I think those number are a bit off but collective will get the point. Animals are lovely but they take a lot to look after.
No bloody wonder no-one ever liked loggies.
 
#65
No bloody wonder no-one ever liked loggies.
Can't find any hard facts except that to feed a house requires 10x the weight of food that man needs. You can see why we move a quick as we could to motor power on that requirement alone. When a vehicle is not running you don't need to feed it.
 
#67
Can't find any hard facts except that to feed a house requires 10x the weight of food that man needs. You can see why we move a quick as we could to motor power on that requirement alone. When a vehicle is not running you don't need to feed it.
oi only 10 sausage...
 
#69
I was in HK 68-70. The mule troop was disbanded during my time there. When I first arrived the RCT had everything except railway - a road transport sqn, plus a GTR Sqn with RCT offrs, the mules and a Maritime Sqn. The mules went as advertised, the RAF being supposed to do the biz.
I don't doubt it - but my memory says Feb '76 at Lu Woh. I'm away from home now but I'll check on return. The railway should have gone RE - RCT in 1965...
 
#70
Back in WW2 my dear old granddad was in Burma/ on an island nr Burma
He was serving in the RN & I believe somehow attached to the RM,

whilst on sentry duty theres movement in the bushes,
the bushes are challenged,
the bushes do not respond,
he opens up with a bren gun,
he's managed to slot the mules which carry the water,

nobody spoke to him for weeks....
 
#71
The army still uses mules to transport drugs through custom, one sausage and 20 condoms is a hearty breakfast
 
#74
Earlier than that. It was about 69 or very early 70. RAF reckoned their choppers could replace the mules. The first time we wanted a radio relay station taken up a mountain thereafter, a cloud came over the sun and the RAF said they couldn't do it.
My father was involved in that. He provided the figures for costs, times etc and was at the meeting where they decided the RAF could do it. It was pointed out that mules can carry on in almost any weather, even when the weather is too loud for pilots to be heard telling everyone they are pilots.

Helicopters are, of course, way better at flying than mules,
 
#77
414 Pack Transport Troop RCT disbanded Jan 76:

IMG_4490.jpg


IMG_4491.jpg


From the RASC/RCT history 1945-82.

Mike Young's 'Waggoner's Way' has this:

"Hong Kong (UPI) January 1976. There were no tears, for that wouldn't be in keeping with the best traditions of the British Army. Their commander patted and scratched each of them individually, a final tribute to a job well done. The inspection and other formalities over, Lt Gen Sir Edwin Bramall, Commander British Forces Hong Kong, worked up a smile, said 'thank you' and quickly marched off. There were no speeches.

The solemn occasion was the official disbandment of 414 Pack Transport Troop of The Royal Corps of Transport, the last mule unit of British Forces. It was in keeping with the British policy of phasing out its defence presence east of Suez. It ended a glorious tradition dating back to 1914."


So, blame Denis Healey.
 
#78
Can't find any hard facts except that to feed a house requires 10x the weight of food that man needs. You can see why we move a quick as we could to motor power on that requirement alone. When a vehicle is not running you don't need to feed it.
Unless you are a pikey your house doesn't lend well to moving supplies.
 
#80
he was also-

Sunk on a Aircraft carrier ( Ark Royal Med?)
Sunk on a PT Boat (Burma?)
Sunk in Pacific (sharks eating survivors)
Sunk on a landing craft ( D Day)

I think he might have been an enemy agent...
 

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