Do Brits need a visa for 1 week training in the U.S.?

#1
Not for me obviously, but I have a friend who works for a startup and may have to go to the U.S. for a week of training. Their internal HR (just one person!) seems to have no clue and said he doesn't need one, as he won't be doing any business, or be paid anything apart from expenses and it will strictly be training only.

Anyone here have any clue, from personal experience? I recommended that he speak with the embassy or some solicitor/ agency knowledgable in this sort of thing.
 

DAS

Old-Salt
#4
ESTA works for training in US as well. Used it several times for that purpose without issue.
 
#8
Assuming that your friend holds a British passport and has never previously been denied entry under the ESTA programme or for any other reason, then I am sure that he can enter for training purposes for less than 90 days on an ESTA.
I have travelled to the US many times on business on an ESTA including attending conferences and providing training.
 
#10
Been to the US many times on business whilst working for US companies. For periods up to ten days.

Originally needed a visa/or the green card “are you a Nazi?” thing but only needed an ESTA in recent years.

Same as with the U.K., training, conferences, sales meetings etc do not count as formal “employment”.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
If it's for training, an ESTA suffices. If his passport has stamps from Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq and a few other places, then he has to get a visa as the ESTA visa waiver doesn't apply to folk who've visited those regions, even if - as in my case - it was on a State Department/FCO-sponsored project.
 
#12
If it's for training, an ESTA suffices. If his passport has stamps from Libya, Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq and a few other places, then he has to get a visa as the ESTA visa waiver doesn't apply to folk who've visited those regions, even if - as in my case - it was on a State Department/FCO-sponsored project.
He is a Brit. And he will be fine then, I think the farthest he got to was those "warzones" in Spain where Brits go and hangout, getting drunk and falling down.

Thanks guys, will let him know.
 
#13
He can probably get in under the visa waiver program. He'll need to apply for an ESTA and fill out the green I-94W landing card, handed out on the 'plane. We all entered on the VWP to join ship and work in US territorial waters for ten weeks so nipping over for a weeks training shouldn't be a problem. He should carry a letter of introduction from his employer to show the immigration officer, too.

Visa Waiver Program: United Kingdom ESTA

ESTA application:-

Home | Official ESTA Application Website, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
 
#13
Been to the US many times on business whilst working for US companies. For periods up to ten days.

Originally needed a visa/or the green card “are you a Nazi?” thing but only needed an ESTA in recent years.

Same as with the U.K., training, conferences, sales meetings etc do not count as formal “employment”.
You still need to declare that you are not a NAZI, though, which might be taxing for some members of this site.
 
#14
He can probably get in under the visa waiver program. He'll need to apply for an ESTA and fill out the green I-94W landing card, handed out on the 'plane. We all entered on the VWP to join ship and work in US territorial waters for ten weeks so nipping over for a weeks training shouldn't be a problem. He should carry a letter of introduction from his employer to show the immigration officer, too.

Visa Waiver Program: United Kingdom ESTA

ESTA application:-

Home | Official ESTA Application Website, U.S. Customs and Border Protection
The green I-94W is no more. It's all electronic now.
Arrival/Departure Forms: I-94 and I-94W | U.S. Customs and Border Protection
 
#17
Yes, the dodgy one was $10 more expensive.
I think it's a bit more expensive than that. From the dodgy one:
Our professional review and ESTA processing services cost USD 88.00 per application, which includes the mandatory US government fee of USD 14.00.

So that'll be $74 more expensive.
 
#18
#20
ESTA is fine as long as you are not working. The implies actually having US employment. When we do shows out there we travel on the ESTA and declare what we are doing when asked at immigration.
In a decade of doing this there have been zero problems
 

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