DIY Wooden Carport

The flat or sloping pent style roof was my original thought, but SWMBO has always hankered after a Shepherd's Hut, and so she therefore desired the her carport to have similar roofing. I may well end up doing as you suggest. We'll see. Especially as I can't get any bloody steel deliveries or posthole digger hire at the moment. So I'll have to wait for a couple of days* weeks* months* years*. *Insert suitable duration here, according to HMGs wishes.




(That's my excuse, and don't you lot do anything to tell her otherwise. I'm quite enjoying my peaceful and restful lock-down)
I was wondering how far the curve would go, if the sides would bulge so to speak…..

Ref felt roofing, cheaper to use yet scottish weather has a habit of ripping it off. At least with tin it is only as secure as the nails securing it.

Ref holes in the metal degrading, using rubber grommets while nailing helps immensely. Using a metal spike for accurate nail positions does ensure secure nails. Metal paint in that nice shade of british racing green adds a bit of colour to it…...

almost forgot, L shape horizontal metal panels along the edge help against the wind as do twisted L bracket tie downs...

Having to secure the same roof two winters in a row teaches you to respect winter storms of 80-90mph winds.
 
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I was wondering how far the curve would go, if the sides would bulge so to speak…..

Ref holes in the metal degrading, using rubber grommets while nailing helps immensely. Using a metal spike for accurate nail positions does ensure secure nails. That make sense? Metal paint in that nice shade of british racing green adds a bit of colour to it…...
Yep. Makes sense. I was planning to use Tek screws (self tappers that also work in wood), which have thick rubber washers already attached. Screw them in (Hex head) and never leaks. Always used for roofing in Kiwiland.
 
I was planning to use Tek screws (self tappers that also work in wood), which have thick rubber washers already attached.
Self-tapping screws don't work for very long in wood. The drill bit is too close in diameter to the screw shank. Galv steel Z-purlins would be better but don't be tempted to self-drill through the roof sheet (drill a clearance hole instead) in case you strip the thread that you'd be cutting in the purlins. It's OK if the roof sheet is thin (or aluminium) and the purlin is thick (or steel) but if they're both the same material of similar thickness, thread-stripping is the likely outcome.

That said, there is a roofing screw that is ridiculously pointy that will puncture galv steel sheet and, not being a self-drill, bites nicely into timber. I can't remember what it's called though. Just don't keep them loose in your pockets.
 
Self-tapping screws don't work for very long in wood. The drill bit is too close in diameter to the screw shank. Galv steel Z-purlins would be better but don't be tempted to self-drill through the roof sheet (drill a clearance hole instead) in case you strip the thread that you'd be cutting in the purlins. It's OK if the roof sheet is thin (or aluminium) and the purlin is thick (or steel) but if they're both the same material of similar thickness, thread-stripping is the likely outcome.

That said, there is a roofing screw that is ridiculously pointy that will puncture galv steel sheet and, not being a self-drill, bites nicely into timber. I can't remember what it's called though. Just don't keep them loose in your pockets.
Good tip thanks:grin:
 
Ehhh . . . Rich, there was a reason I didn't mention Mr Bane's name you know. The bloke seems to attract bad luck disasters.
Yeah like he painted the pallets he used for his wood shed in red to hide the blood spatter....oh how we laughed...
 
The REME know f**k all about construction work...
I guessing your gonna tell us all that the Royal Engineers are better, know all there is to know etc. etc. I’m also guessing that by your user name your probably EOD or ex, but then we all know you're limited to WW2 bombs and an assortment of mines, preferring to leave real EOD work to the RLC. So, fuckwits in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones, as usually you find it’s toughened glass and stone bounces back and hits you right between the eyes.
I could have been RE, but instead I chose a trade.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
One point to consider, if installing the carport along the side of the house, make sure you have a means of access for clearing out gutters and blocked pipes
 
I guessing your gonna tell us all that the Royal Engineers are better, know all there is to know etc. etc. I’m also guessing that by your user name your probably EOD or ex, but then we all know you're limited to WW2 bombs and an assortment of mines, preferring to leave real EOD work to the RLC. So, fuckwits in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones, as usually you find it’s toughened glass and stone bounces back and hits you right between the eyes.
I could have been RE, but instead I chose a trade.
...someone's a bit pre-menstrual....
 
It strikes me that there are two ways to approach this.

Either...

(1) Install really solid fence posts (e.g. 1.5m long150x150x6mm steel angles set 1m deep in concrete with 150x150 timbers coach-bolted to them) and attach a comparatively rickety frame to them...

Or...

(2) Build a substantial, well-braced frame attached to a comparatively light anchoring system (e.g. Metposts set in about 0.5m depth of concrete or, if you are building this on an existing concrete drive, steel angles screwbolted to the concrete).

In (1), you rely on the anchor to provide stiffness to the structure, resistance to uplift and sliding - i.e. bending, axial and shear loads. In (2), the anchor is just to resist uplift (by weight of concrete) and sliding (by shear load) - i.e. just axial and shear loads.
You missed out option 3 and 4...
Option 3. Empty all the fecking shite out of the garage and make room for the car.
Option 4. Get SWMBO to wax and polish the car more often.
No need to thank me.

Close the thread.
 
You missed out option 3 and 4...
Option 3. Empty all the fecking shite out of the garage and make room for the car.
Option 4. Get SWMBO to wax and polish the car more often.
No need to thank me.

Close the thread.
I don't have a garage, which is why I'm planning on building the carport, and then move on to building a large workshop for moi.
 
Just a quick update.

The car port is not going ahead.

Seemingly SWMBO got a bit confused between Port, Portico, Porch and Pergola.

What she actually wanted was a pergola, so she could grow some climbing plants.

Oh, she also wants 12 metres of 1.8m high cedar fencing, a low stone wall surrounding a raised bed . . . with a water feature in the middle.


FFS
 

Rab_C

War Hero
Just a quick update.

The car port is not going ahead.

Seemingly SWMBO got a bit confused between Port, Portico, Porch and Pergola.

What she actually wanted was a pergola, so she could grow some climbing plants.

Oh, she also wants 12 metres of 1.8m high cedar fencing, a low stone wall surrounding a raised bed . . . with a water feature in the middle.


FFS
Crack on then, photos of the finished items by Monday or it didn’t happen :)
 
I’ve been knocking a car port together over lockdown, weather permitting. My first large DIY project, previously I had only made a stool in woodwork class...back in the early 70’s. ;-)
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Truxx

LE
Prepare treated timber that will be buried by taring it twice to at least 8 inch above ground this will more than double it's life span. Make sure it's dry before placing them.
We once employed the services of an amazing Latvian carpenter. Back home, he said, they would build a big bonfire and all the ends of the timbers they used to build houses would be stuck in and partially burned, presumably the outer inch or so.

Then they would be stuck in the holes where they would remain, intact, for hundreds of years.
 
MMMM, Nice pick up, photos if you please

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Always happy to oblige, she has been mentioned on other threads but...
1953 Chevy Pickup, 235 straight 6 engine, Fenton headers, offenhauser intakes, twin Rochesters, 4 speed box and a high ratio back axle. ;-)

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My intention is to plank out the sides of the ‘barn’ to half height and have roll up tarpaulins to fill in the top. This way I get fresh air and natural light when the weather is reasonable and can batten down the hatches when not.
The back wall will be full height planking.
 
I’ve been knocking a car port together over lockdown, weather permitting. My first large DIY project, previously I had only made a stool in woodwork class...back in the early 70’s. ;-)
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On behalf of the @MrBane Appreciation Society and the @MrBane School of Professional Handymen we thank you for your submission...one of our agents will be in touch with you shortly to arrange a time for viewing...
 

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