DIY Wooden Carport

It's actually going to be 6 posts. The plan is for a carport about 5 metres long, 3 metres wide, with thick vertical fencing on the 3 closed sides, with 2 x 4s as stringers. Planning on a curved corrugated steel roof.
Dont suppose you could jot down a wee diagram please …the curved roofing is intriguing me.
 
It's actually going to be 6 posts. The plan is for a carport about 5 metres long, 3 metres wide, with thick vertical fencing on the 3 closed sides, with 2 x 4s as stringers. Planning on a curved corrugated steel roof.
Let's be honest, you are secretly building a Nissan Hut!!!
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I put this log shelter in a few years back.

In case anyone from the council is reading this.......

Er I mean this log shelter was here when we moved in some years back.

Old telegraph poles buried a couple of feet, set in concrete.

Job jobbed.

Isn’t pretty but it works. Telegraph poles are creosoted so don’t rot or draw in moisture.

AA3FDC2B-7D08-4B34-8502-BD9805AB062D.jpeg
3A6424F7-9687-423F-883D-2CC8C0C8A4E9.jpeg
 
I built a car port with the old man a good few years back, Milton Keynes is not noted for its high winds but 20 years later and its still as strong as ever. The method we used was to hire a post screw (see pic) we sank the posts 3 ft into the ground and poured in concrete, the small diameter hole ensures it will remain ridged no mater what, it’s how they put telegraph poles in the ground. We also painted the ends and 3.5 ft up the post in pitch prior to dropping them in the ground and coned the top of the concrete so when dry the tendency was for the water to flow away from the post. We used 6 posts each 4”x4” x 11’ and braced front to rear and side to side, we also braced the top corners from the uprights to the cross braces. Hope that helps

D98263B9-CBB1-4329-9B50-60FCBA1F3F9A.jpeg
 
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It strikes me that there are two ways to approach this.

Either...

(1) Install really solid fence posts (e.g. 1.5m long150x150x6mm steel angles set 1m deep in concrete with 150x150 timbers coach-bolted to them) and attach a comparatively rickety frame to them...

Or...

(2) Build a substantial, well-braced frame attached to a comparatively light anchoring system (e.g. Metposts set in about 0.5m depth of concrete or, if you are building this on an existing concrete drive, steel angles screwbolted to the concrete).

In (1), you rely on the anchor to provide stiffness to the structure, resistance to uplift and sliding - i.e. bending, axial and shear loads. In (2), the anchor is just to resist uplift (by weight of concrete) and sliding (by shear load) - i.e. just axial and shear loads.
 
It strikes me that there are two ways to approach this.

Either...

(1) Install really solid fence posts (e.g. 1.5m long150x150x6mm steel angles set 1m deep in concrete with 150x150 timbers coach-bolted to them) and attach a comparatively rickety frame to them...

Or...

(2) Build a substantial, well-braced frame attached to a comparatively light anchoring system (e.g. Metposts set in about 0.5m depth of concrete or, if you are building this on an existing concrete drive, steel angles screwbolted to the concrete).

In (1), you rely on the anchor to provide stiffness to the structure, resistance to uplift and sliding - i.e. bending, axial and shear loads. In (2), the anchor is just to resist uplift (by weight of concrete) and sliding (by shear load) - i.e. just axial and shear loads.
Yep, my money would be on #2 every time. Diagonal bracing is your friend. Otherwise, any slight flexing of the structure under wind loading tends to rock the ground fixing, compressing the soil around it or twist the post in its anchorage. Next storm it flexes more etc. Lots of fence panels disintegrate in storms because slight rocking of the posts gradually pulls the fixings apart.
 
I built a car port with the old man a good few years back, Milton Keynes is not noted for its high winds but 20 years later and its still as strong as ever. The method we used was to hire a post screw (see pic) we sank the posts 3 ft into the ground and poured in concrete, the small diameter hole ensures it will remain ridged no mater what, it’s how they put telegraph poles in the ground. We also painted the ends and 3.5 ft up the post in pitch prior to dropping them in the ground and coned the top of the concrete so when dry the tendency was for the water to flow away from the post. We used 6 posts each 4”x4” x 11’ and braced front to rear and side to side, we also braced the top corners from the uprights to the cross braces. Hope that helps

View attachment 463086
A tad windy in MK a few weeks back!!! I acquired part of a shed and a trampoline but had some panel blown over. The neighbors had 10 new panels disappear overnight at the same time but I think it was the unpaid members of the caravan club doing some nockturnal and out of hours DIY/RAZZING.
 
Anyone round here in REME?









Thought not.
 
And they built the Nightingale hospital in 9 days!
Miracles I tell you... Miracles!
 
Dont suppose you could jot down a wee diagram please …the curved roofing is intriguing me.
Sure. It will take a couple of days, but I'll do it.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
I wouldn't think any timber posts in the ground concreted in or not would last long ? I'd put steel in the ground and timber above ground.

Maybe these ?
View attachment 461003
I use these for footings for large stick sheds cemented in place with post Crete, not one of them has collapse yet, the wind loading in storms on sides would be in excess of what your car port would experience.
 
I use these for footings for large stick sheds cemented in place with post Crete, not one of them has collapse yet, the wind loading in storms on sides would be in excess of what your car port would experience.
I was thinking of using these or something similar. Designed specifically for in-concrete embedding. I've done some calculations, and with the strength of our winds round here, I need to expect a lateral force of 0.4 tonne, once I have the side fencing in place, it will give a surface area towards the wind of 10m^2, and with a maximum speed of 120 kph

 
That's a bit harsh. They certainly know how to tell you the fücking thing's fücked.
But only the vehicle the bits came in.

Considering the sheer forces I stuck up a summerhouse in the garden last year using my tried and tested 2m square frames -1/2 the garage built with them about 10 years back.

Being lazy and as I was pushing the permitted development a little, I wanted a less difficult option if it was going to have to be shifted, I went for the plastic geogrid stuff for the base and just sat a decking base on top and built off that.
Obviously securing the decking to the grid was going to be an issue as I wanted it to be square and came up with GBFO cable ties.
It didn't move during construction or when the last gust of wind placed the trampoline against it after that shrugged off the 25kg sandbags holding it to the deck.
The throughflow of air underneath it and insulation make it a surprisingly dry and warm little spot even in the winter and I'm planning how to fit one of my gasbottle woodburners in there next time I make one.
 
Dont suppose you could jot down a wee diagram please …the curved roofing is intriguing me.
My sketching ability is crap. But here is an example of what I intend.
1586292967905.png

This picture shows the curved sheets, supported on purlins of staggered height. I was planning on 3,6 and 12" sets.
The sheeting I've seen (link further below) is for a sheet of corrugated steel, with a 12 " rise over a 7' 6" length. I was planning on having 2 sheets end to end (with overlap) over the width of the carport, and extending them to the back of the carport as needed. They are 2' 6" wide, so I would probably need 5 or 6 pairs.


 
Might I suggest that you'd be better off using flat (i.e. not curved) sheets to construct a pent roof? It would be much easier to order the sheet length that you actually need and you'd be able to fasten the roof down more securely.

It sounds simple to bolt sheets together in pairs to make up the width but it's a bit harder in practice. Plus, each hole you make damages the galvanising so you'd be reducing the longevity of the roof.

Personally, I'd go for a felt-covered plywood pent roof. You can make it as strong as you want, it's easier to adjust and repairs would be easier.
 
I built a car port with the old man a good few years back, Milton Keynes is not noted for its high winds but 20 years later and its still as strong as ever. The method we used was to hire a post screw (see pic) we sank the posts 3 ft into the ground and poured in concrete, the small diameter hole ensures it will remain ridged no mater what, it’s how they put telegraph poles in the ground. We also painted the ends and 3.5 ft up the post in pitch prior to dropping them in the ground and coned the top of the concrete so when dry the tendency was for the water to flow away from the post. We used 6 posts each 4”x4” x 11’ and braced front to rear and side to side, we also braced the top corners from the uprights to the cross braces. Hope that helps

View attachment 463086
I used similar post hole diggers (earth augers) in NZ, but the type I used was a hydraulic, designed for 1 person usage.
 
Might I suggest that you'd be better off using flat (i.e. not curved) sheets to construct a pent roof? It would be much easier to order the sheet length that you actually need and you'd be able to fasten the roof down more securely.

It sounds simple to bolt sheets together in pairs to make up the width but it's a bit harder in practice. Plus, each hole you make damages the galvanising so you'd be reducing the longevity of the roof.

Personally, I'd go for a felt-covered plywood pent roof. You can make it as strong as you want, it's easier to adjust and repairs would be easier.
The flat or sloping pent style roof was my original thought, but SWMBO has always hankered after a Shepherd's Hut, and so she therefore desired the her carport to have similar roofing. I may well end up doing as you suggest. We'll see. Especially as I can't get any bloody steel deliveries or posthole digger hire at the moment. So I'll have to wait for a couple of days* weeks* months* years*. *Insert suitable duration here, according to HMGs wishes.















(That's my excuse, and don't you lot do anything to tell her otherwise. I'm quite enjoying my peaceful and restful lock-down)
 

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