Dissertation: British Army capabilities post Cold War

#21
I think that if people wish to assist Hugh in his dissertation they need to read his original post again. He has asked for people to participate in his research by answering a questionaire which he will share by PM.

The subject of his dissertation is :

Have the previous three decades irreparably damaged the British Army’s battlefield capabilities?

That would be 1989, close to the end of the Cold War until now and he is looking for serving or recently retired individuals to assist him in his research.

If you fit and if you can assist contact Hugh via PM.
 
#22
I play my 'those who ignore history are doomed to repeat it' card.

The determination among seniors/budgeters to ignore history is the biggest driver of the hole we're in now.

I'd therefore enthusiastically encourage your participation.

(But then we're probably in considerable agreement over many things...)
But then, as @twentyfirstoffoot says;
Have the previous three decades irreparably damaged the British Army’s battlefield capabilities?

That would be 1989, close to the end of the Cold War until now and he is looking for serving or recently retired individuals to assist him in his research.
My service was very largely in the previous couple of decades to that, and only marginally in battlefield-greenery, so I doubt that I have the sort of penetrating military views (other than at second-hand) which the OP is looking for. Others here, who have experienced the tedium of doctrinal lectures during the relevant period, would be better placed to advise. I can tell exciting stories about breaking down on Luneburger Heide, and surveillance in subzero temperatures in Berlin, though; oh yes. But that would be wasting Mr Jarce's time.
 
#23
Once again, I'd like to thank you all for the responses so far. If anyone is interested in getting involved but is unsure about whether they've been out too long please feel free to PM me to discuss it.

I should also confirm that those wishing to participate need to PM me first. The ethical approval rules mean I'm not allowed to message people first - even if they have expressed interest on this thread.

Interesting point. We had 'the' threat as well as numerous peripheral post-colonial obligations, if I might term them thus.

At the time, the constant refrain was prepare for 'a' war, not 'the' war.

Of late, I think we've neglected that. We've concentrated too, too much on 'a' war (typically expeditionary, for two reasons: until recently it was the immediate task at hand; and because it didn't involve lots of heavy elements it was relatively cheap and therefore acceptable to politicians' ears).

It's left us under-resourced and over-exposed.
@Cold_Collation this post is very relevant to at least two of the questions, if you'd like to participate.
 

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