Disposal of munitions

#2
Yes. Send it to BATUS for a fraction of the cost and we will dem it. But the Army likes to spend money disposing of its dross.

To be fair though, Swingfire and 30mm are still in service (I suspect that 25mm and 4.5 is as well). They are probably out of date stock that needed disposing of. The shame of it is that we have a trade that has the remit to logistically dispose of ammunition, so it does seem a waste of money to pay someone else to do it.
 
#3
Just read the link. It appears the contract has been cancelled.
 
#4
dingerr said:
Yes. Send it to BATUS for a fraction of the cost and we will dem it. But the Army likes to spend money disposing of its dross.

To be fair though, Swingfire and 30mm are still in service (I suspect that 25mm and 4.5 is as well). They are probably out of date stock that needed disposing of. The shame of it is that we have a trade that has the remit to logistically dispose of ammunition, so it does seem a waste of money to pay someone else to do it.
I do find it surprising that Swingfire is still in service. I remember seeing it in a book of "The British Army" I was given as a child in the 1970's. I gather it was introduced in 1967!

I can understand that Gun barrels wear out if you shot it all off but surely the swingfires could be used for training?

Are they being replaced?

For that matter if we shot off surplus or near life expired ammunition we could keep a domestic barrel making plant in business - an important strategic asset that we lack.
 
#5
Disposal of surplus German munitions CLICKY
 
#7
IIRC Swingfire is no longer in service therefore has no training value. The other stock will be shelf life expired and approaching the end of its safe life. I was told over 10 years ago that there are not enough spare AT's around these days to dispose of the stock. Not a core unit task see! With the current Operational tempo I can only assume that situation is exascerbated. These days, by far cheapest way is to put it out to contract disposal. Also lets the boys concentrate on ops, leave, course etc.

OTT
 
#8
Onetup3 said:
IIRC Swingfire is no longer in service therefore has no training value. The other stock will be shelf life expired and approaching the end of its safe life. I was told over 10 years ago that there are not enough spare AT's around these days to dispose of the stock. Not a core unit task see! With the current Operational tempo I can only assume that situation is exascerbated. These days, by far cheapest way is to put it out to contract disposal. Also lets the boys concentrate on ops, leave, course etc.

OTT
Still in service according to MoD:
http://www.army.mod.uk/equipment/av/av_str.htm

Who has it on charge?
 
#9
Several months ago I spoke to the chap that used to manage them, he said they have gone the same way as TOW & Milan. In the bin! Dont get me wrong, loved the beast, a flying Barmine guaranteed to do what is said on the tin, assuming you could hit the bloody target of course. However the EDC 1S was susceptible to FoI issues with age.
 
#10
Swingfire is still in service because there is no enemy armour out there that it cannot defeat. Also it is used with recce and they seem to like the 4km range.

Its fired from the FV102, i think the only unit that still retains this is the H.Cav
 
#11
Old Swingfire missiles have a tendency to go vertical btw!
 
#12
Only if the user doesn't do their drills correctly.
 
#13
ObnoxiousJockGit said:
Old Swingfire missiles have a tendency to go vertical btw!
When the AT forgot to replace/reposition the breakwire loop during headchange (converting HE to practice), the missile would exit the launch box at 45 degrees and kept on climbing until cut down by range safety. Oh how we would laugh at the poor unfortunate responsible as they trotted off to see the SATO. :oops:
 
#14
dingerr said:
Swingfire is still in service because there is no enemy armour out there that it cannot defeat. Also it is used with recce and they seem to like the 4km range.

Its fired from the FV102, i think the only unit that still retains this is the H.Cav
I will check with my source on Monday, it could just be wishful thinking that it has reached its OSD. On the other hand I could be having a senior moment.
 
#15
Whats wrong with using it on all the chavs and crooks out here , if it goes slightly off course and takes out a few chav bystanders all well and good. At least the decent population wouldnt complain about it.
 
#17
OldTimer said:
Whats wrong with using it on all the chavs and crooks out here , if it goes slightly off course and takes out a few chav bystanders all well and good. At least the decent population wouldnt complain about it.
Because they are not worh the steam off my shit; let alone a £13,000 missile.
 
#18
but if we are chucking them anyway?
attach chav light blue paper and see it you can stear the chavfire missile between goalposts 1k away :twisted:
 
#19
Onetup3 said:
dingerr said:
Swingfire is still in service because there is no enemy armour out there that it cannot defeat. Also it is used with recce and they seem to like the 4km range.

Its fired from the FV102, i think the only unit that still retains this is the H.Cav
I will check with my source on Monday, it could just be wishful thinking that it has reached its OSD. On the other hand I could be having a senior moment.
Finally got through to my sources, all Swingfire withdrawn from service Sept 06
 
#20
Dismantling and recycling of munitions is now common place. Obsolete munitions and stockpiles of munitions that need to be destroyed under treaty obligations are rarely sent for disposal by demolition. This is for two reasons. First the munition can be broken down into componants that can be reused or recycled. Metallic and electronic componants can be reused and explosives can be rendered into commercial explosives or sold on to other states. The second reason (dare I utter it) is that demolition by explosives has an effect on the environment.

Unfortunately, whilst the British Army has plenty of expertise and capability in the disposal of ordnance, they have none in dismantling and recycling. Even landmine stockpiles are dismantled and recylced usually by a commercial company on a contract:

http://maic.jmu.edu/Journal/7.2/focus/dansereau/dansereau.htm

K13
 

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