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discharged for drugs

No our positive CDT fails are advised that they can reapply in 2 years. This was a surprise to me to be honest but I've just been through the process of discharging one of my soldiers for this.
Cheers for the update on this, handy to know.

In future, when giving careers advice to former Squaddie CDT "dischargees" whishing to rejoin, I'll have to re-script the patter from; "WHAT?! Clearly you are still taking them, Lofty", to : "No to the Navy, but have a word with your former employer. Now - do one."
 
I believe that the 2 year thing is part of the rehabilitation of offenders act.

Therefore the navy too would have to consider CDT failures for drafts. Of course how high they rank the reformed junkie in the selection process is probably still up the empluer.
 
In 2009 a survey (anonymised) was conducted by DPS(A) of all Army recruits at the ATRs, which revealed 87% of them had used (varying between regular and recreational) or experimented with Class A, B and C drugs. Has that metric changed remarkably, highly doubtful.
The RN does the pretty much the same survey during the recruit's first drugs lecture with a show of hands ("we won't prosecute you, honest") and the figures are broadly similar. Sometimes I wonder if it's just a bit of bravado from the young thrusters trying to impress their oppos with their worldy-ways but suspect it's more likely a reflection of my naivety.
I believe that the 2 year thing is part of the rehabilitation of offenders act.

Therefore the navy too would have to consider CDT failures for drafts. Of course how high they rank the reformed junkie in the selection process is probably still up the empluer.
The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act doesn't apply as it's an administrative discharge for gross misconduct. If the individual was discharged under a disciplinary category, the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act would indeed apply.

Reformed "junkies", with no prior military service are a different matter and their suitability for service is a medical issue.
 

Momba Womba

On ROPS
On ROPs
(I was unable to find a smilie for Irony)
 
hi I am worried about my son as I know he has been discharged for drug misuse my only question is, is does it come under admin discharge or dishonourable discharge ? its really playing on his mind but most of all mine as I would like to think it wasn't dishonourable! I know he did wrong and he has been punished for it tenfold by myself, but any help would be greatly appreciated.

thank you in advance

This is gospel

Personnel discharged from the Armed Services after a positive Compulsory Drug Test (CDT) result or an admission of taking a banned substance may apply to rejoin the Army after a period of two years since date of discharge. A prior service check will be conducted and if the application is accepted the applicant will attend a face to face interview by a Staff Personnel Selection Officer (SPSO) at the Army Personnel Centre (APC) Glasgow or an Army Assessment Centre.

On re-joining, applicants will be placed on the Individual Retest (IRT) programme and subject to no-notice CDT for up to two years after re-joining.
 
subject to no-notice CDT for up to two years after re-joining.

As Bile-Spewer says. No notice is given for any CDT.

However, I think that there is a system where an individual can be brought to another unit, which is undergoing CDT, to increase the number of times an individual is tested.

Ie a member of a Tidworth based unit is brought to a Bulford based unit.
 
At the peak of TELIC + HERRiCK operations between 2007 - 2009, the level of attrition on troops was knocking the PUD percentage of Army personnel into double figures. This was a combination of issues, which related both to impact of operational issues and non operational ones, but suffice to say the non deployable assets were causing VSO's to groan about PUD stats. In amongst those figures were approximately a battalion's worth of soldiers p.a. binned for CDT failure.

In consequence a programme was devised to address these losses on the basis that class A drug use, in particular Cocaine was considered by the psychologists and other drug experts as a reversible trend. The thought process went along lines that those using cannabis were likely long term habits and little chance to reverse behaviour.

Those using Cocaine or Ecstacy at the time invariably fitted in with the risky behaviour and those caught had often partaken in combination with binge drinking i.e. the Army favours recruitment of individuals who are not risk averse to do the job, so hardly a surprise their risky behaviour with binge drinking, fast driving, risky sexual behaviour etc. A week long programme was devised to reeducate those individuals sponsored by units, who had a likelihood for behaviour modification to work (it included a range of counselling and regular CDT follow up checks).

The programme sponsored by DPS(A), was successful in the main, but as recruitment later improved, and operational pressures abated, the programme was wound down. The question remains, should the programme be revived (I'm unsighted to know if it has) to assist with the rapid decline of Army personnel through poor retention or does it conflict with CDRILS (an important recruiting feature)? In other words, should needs override standards or is it needs must when the devil drives - out the camp gate?
 
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Momba Womba

On ROPS
On ROPs
As Bile-Spewer says. No notice is given for any CDT.

However, I think that there is a system where an individual can be brought to another unit, which is undergoing CDT, to increase the number of times an individual is tested.

Ie a member of a Tidworth based unit is brought to a Bulford based unit.


MO is able to run urine testing.
At the peak of TELIC + HERRiCK operations between 2007 - 2009, the level of attrition on troops was knocking the percentage of Army personnel into double figures. This was a combination of issues, which related both to impact of operational issues and no operational ones, but suffice to say the non deployable assets were causing VSO's to groan about PUD stats. In amongst those figures were approximately a battalion's worth of per soldiers binned for CDT failure.

In consequence a programme was devised to address these losses on the basis that class A drug use, in particular Cocaine was considered by the psychologists and other drug experts was a reversible trend. The thought process went along lines that those using cannabis were likely long term habits and little chance to reverse behaviour.

Those using Cocaine or Ecstacy at the time invariably fitted in with the risky behaviour and those caught had often partaken in combination with binge drinking i.e. the Army favours recruitment of individuals who are not risk averse to do the job, so hardly a surprise their risky behaviour with binge drinking, fast driving, risky sexual behaviour etc. A week long programme was devised to reeducate those individuals sponsored by units, who had a likelihood for behaviour modification to work (it included a range of counselling and regular CDT follow up checks).

The programme sponsored by DPS(A), was successful in the main, but as recruitment later improved, and operational pressures abated, the programme was wound down. The question remains, should the programme be revived (I'm unsighted to know if it has) to assist with the rapid decline of Army personnel through poor retention or does it conflict with CDRILS (an important recruiting feature)? In other words, should needs override standards or is it needs must when the devil drives - out the camp gate?


What the actual fcuk are you on about?
 
You could keep them.

Send them to a specialist E Coy ( :) ) at MCTC, as a SUS for a month.

Then at unit use instant drug tests daily for a month or so, then reduce the frequency. On top of the normal CDT.

Instant tests could be cost neutral by billing the individual being tested.
 
You could keep them.

Send them to a specialist E Coy ( :) ) at MCTC, as a SUS for a month.

Then at unit use instant drug tests daily for a month or so, then reduce the frequency. On top of the normal CDT.

Instant tests could be cost neutral by billing the individual being tested.
Doesn't or rather didn't work without a comprehensive drug re-education programme. With it, there was about an 89% success rate on follow up. There were a few that let themselves and their CO's down (candidates for the programme were all sponsored by their CO), but it was a relatively small number.
 
MO is able to run urine testing.



What the actual fcuk are you on about?

Just read the English between the spaces, it's fairly clear to most.

Dummy version here -
The Army tends to recruit risk takers (it needs them), so it's not a surprise when they take risks outside of their day job. That includes, alcoholic bingeing, seeking adrenaline fixes like driving cars or motorcycles too fast, thinking they can beat STDs bareback, and use of Class A drugs! Some are good soldiers and can be reeducated, is it worth it - possibly 'yes', if Army numbers can't be maintained otherwise. Does it confilct with Army standards and send wrong message to recruits - hell yes!

MO myth exploded -
MO's will not get involved with drug testing, they never have! It's in conflict with clinical governance even for Occ Health. CDT is purely a discipline issue, and there is a dedicated laboratory under a Defence contract processing the CDT material.
 

Momba Womba

On ROPS
On ROPs
Just read the English between the spaces, it's fairly clear to most.

Dummy version here -
The Army tends to recruit risk takers (it needs them), so it's not a surprise when they take risks outside of their day job. That includes, alcoholic bingeing, seeking adrenaline fixes like driving cars or motorcycles too fast, thinking they can beat STDs bareback, and use of Class A drugs! Some are good soldiers and can be reeducated, is it worth it - possibly 'yes', if Army numbers can't be maintained otherwise. Does it confilct with Army standards and send wrong message to recruits - hell yes!

MO myth exploded -
MO's will not get involved with drug testing, they never have! It's in conflict with clinical governance even for Occ Health. CDT is purely a discipline issue, and there is a dedicated laboratory under a Defence contract processing the CDT material.


It's so poorly written that it's difficult to make any sense of.


Mate was tested by the doc after he tried to blag his way out of the army turned himself in for having a drug problem - I know not what the process was with regard to the who's and hows.

Hence 'able' rather than 'will'.

It's in conflict with clinical governance even for Occ Health.

Informative for this.
 
Just read the English between the spaces, it's fairly clear to most.

Dummy version here -
The Army tends to recruit risk takers (it needs them), so it's not a surprise when they take risks outside of their day job. That includes, alcoholic bingeing, seeking adrenaline fixes like driving cars or motorcycles too fast, thinking they can beat STDs bareback, and use of Class A drugs! Some are good soldiers and can be reeducated, is it worth it - possibly 'yes', if Army numbers can't be maintained otherwise.

It's not worth it I forget the actual stats but less than 1% of the army fail CDT. A lot of young soldiers tell me they joined up to do something with their lives, all they were doing before basic training was hanging around with their chav mates doing ectasy or cannabis (most couldnt afford cocaine). Lets not encourage second chances.
 

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