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discharged for drugs

hi I am worried about my son as I know he has been discharged for drug misuse my only question is, is does it come under admin discharge or dishonourable discharge ? its really playing on his mind but most of all mine as I would like to think it wasn't dishonourable! I know he did wrong and he has been punished for it tenfold by myself, but any help would be greatly appreciated.

thank you in advance
 
He will find it just as hard to get a job in either case.
 
His reference from the Army will refer to the reason for his discharge, I believe. I saw the wording somewhere before I left.
 
His reference from the Army will refer to the reason for his discharge, I believe. I saw the wording somewhere before I left.
It does on his 108. I can't remember the ex act phrase but it's something along the lines of soldier discharged due to testing positive on a drugs tests.
Luckily loads of employees don't give a **** about 108s and even if there are it's not hard to find an electronic copy and alter it to suit yourself. So long as you don't try to join the old bill or something like the that the chances are it won't affect much.
 
He will find it just as hard to get a job in either case.

Not necessarily. I was arrested for posession in the late 80's. Ended up as an "approved person" with a "significant influence function" at various banks......but always disclosed it.

Times have changed. I worked for a Dutch bank for five years or so, where they literally laughed my sheepishly mentioning it. Big deal to some, not so to others.
 
My old Det Sgt always disclosed his student conviction, for cultivating cannabis in his halls of residence room. Had to be revealed to CPS in every single prosecution he was involved in, them's the rules. He got through DV though, no problem.

I appreciate your disappointment, but your lad's only 17, the impact will dissipate with time. In many future job applications, they'll ask about convictions but some, especially when under 18 years of age, become 'spent' so he might consider that this event, which is not even a conviction, won't warrant a mention on applications. Obviously not so with anything official where the recruiter can actually apply for the information themselves. Being a daft kid is one thing, dishonesty is different.
 
Well put. Grown up people understand this all too well.

Not in the army they don't, anyone who gets caught on CDT will never ever get a job, they will be a leper to society, their life will be ruined for ever and other such scare stories.
 
Not necessarily. I was arrested for posession in the late 80's. Ended up as an "approved person" with a "significant influence function" at various banks......but always disclosed it.

Times have changed. I worked for a Dutch bank for five years or so, where they literally laughed my sheepishly mentioning it. Big deal to some, not so to others.

There's quite a big gulf between your situation and his.

His was a condition of service. What right minded employer is going to take someone one on who may ignore their instructions and leave them liable for their employee's negligence?
 
There's quite a big gulf between your situation and his.

His was a condition of service. What right minded employer is going to take someone one on who may ignore their instructions and leave them liable for their employee's negligence?

You have a point but I think most employers don't care provided that you don't do it at work and don't attend work under the influence of drugs. I'm talking about cannabis, not the hard stuff. There are some places where you are strictly monitored and regularly tested. London Underground train driving is one that comes to mind but provided you are not working while under the influence of drugs, the majority of people don't care.

I might be hanging around in the wrong circle of people but I know plenty of people who smoke weed. That includes people who use it both for recreational purposes and medical reasons. Some of them hold down very responsible jobs and some are currently or have been in a political role. That includes all the political parties.

I have to say some are more open about their usage of weed than others are but it's not a state secret for most of them. Personally, I've always drunk too much beer to be interested in drugs. I've probably smoked half a dozen spliffs in my life and I'm 61 now plus I haven't even smoked tobacco for around 35 years.

Admittedly, I've not had many different employers over the years because I stuck with one for 20 years but of the few I worked for before I ended up there, only the very first one after I left the army looked at my army reference and that was because I offered it to him.
 
There's quite a big gulf between your situation and his.

His was a condition of service. What right minded employer is going to take someone one on who may ignore their instructions and leave them liable for their employee's negligence?

Most employers (of the type young lads will work for) probably wont even inquire why they left the army.
 
There's quite a big gulf between your situation and his.

His was a condition of service. What right minded employer is going to take someone one on who may ignore their instructions and leave them liable for their employee's negligence?

Most people outside take, or have taken drugs at least once - be it a spliff or a line of coke. As others say, it'll be a problem for things like police etc, but otherwise most people won't care.
 
.....provided you are not working while under the influence of drugs, the majority of people don't care.

With respect to cannabis, absolutely.

As for being asked for the reason he left the Army, I can only comment that I've never once been asked. I've only been asked what I did while "in", out of their curiosity more than whether it would have any bearing on the role for which I was being interviewed.

I've also interviewed ex-services, and never asked for a "red book", or whatever it's called these days.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
With respect to cannabis, absolutely.

As for being asked for the reason he left the Army, I can only comment that I've never once been asked. I've only been asked what I did while "in", out of their curiosity more than whether it would have any bearing on the role for which I was being interviewed.

I've also interviewed ex-services, and never asked for a "red book", or whatever it's called these days.

the red book has been replaced with a sheet of A4 paper
 
Tell him to leave it a year or two, and then join back up. The Army will snap him up
 

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