Disabled Outrage Bus

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-30376446

I've been following this case throughout the morning on the news and watched an interview with the gentleman concerned. He came across as a very reasonable chap, but what intrigues me about the case is the attitude of the mother whose baby was sleeping in a pushchair in the wheelchair space on the bus. Apparently she refused point-blank to collapse the push-chair and the man in the wheelchair therefore had no choice but to wait for the next bus as there was no room available.
Given the recent outrage by the "sisterhood" over Nigel Farage's comments about the breast feeding mother, is it reasonable to expect the Mumsnet crowd to speak up on behalf of this verdict or are they more likely to condemn the mother concerned? :roll:
So was the mother being unreasonable or within her rights to stand her ground? My own personal view is there should have been a way of resolving the situation amicably without it going to court, but, it ends up as another example of the modern world gone mad.
Quite a quandary for the equal opportunities industry this one?
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leeds-30376446

I've been following this case throughout the morning on the news and watched an interview with the gentleman concerned. He came across as a very reasonable chap, but what intrigues me about the case is the attitude of the mother whose baby was sleeping in a pushchair in the wheelchair space on the bus. Apparently she refused point-blank to collapse the push-chair and the man in the wheelchair therefore had no choice but to wait for the next bus as there was no room available.
Given the recent outrage by the "sisterhood" over Nigel Farage's comments about the breast feeding mother, is it reasonable to expect the Mumsnet crowd to speak up on behalf of this verdict or are they more likely to condemn the mother concerned? :roll:
So was the mother being unreasonable or within her rights to stand her ground? My own personal view is there should have been a way of resolving the situation amicably without it going to court, but, it ends up as another example of the modern world gone mad.
Quite a quandary for the equal opportunities industry this one?
The same is true for mothers with pushchairs if there's no room they've to catch another bus. Think of double buggy, two kids, one Mum.
 
The same is true for mothers with pushchairs if there's no room they've to catch another bus. Think of double buggy, two kids, one Mum.

Very true, there must be bun fights all the time. I suppose I should count my blessings that I don't use buses!
 
No idea about buses but been on a couple of trains with a mate who's in a chair where there's been a buggy in the space and both times the guard told the mother to collapse it and move. (Which they both did without any moaning).
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
The areas are designated as "wheelchair priority" spaces, pushchairs are allowed use but should either collapse or make room for a wheelchair user. My partner is disabled and has to use buses, the amount of grief she's had is unreal including the threat of physical violence (threat to "mash up your face", I'll leave you to recognise the racial profile) with the actual drivers doing/saying nothing. We attended a disabled access day at the ExCel in Docklands a while back with all the head sheds from certain transport companies including trains and TfL where comments were noted and promises made. This case will end up going all the way to the ECHR where it will be made law. We had a holiday in Paris in July and as much as I'm not a lover of Les Grenouilles, they do tend to give disabled more freedom and the people themselves are more likely to move for disabled people than our home grown crowd.
 
In my experience the Mumsnet crowd is just a place for breeders to slap each other on the back for being "the most important people in the world."
They'll gladhand each other for pushing one out of their tardlauncher & to Hades with anyone with a challenging or different opinion.
They're pretty hot on censoring too so your comments will be deleted after them telling you you'll die alone etc etc. No naughty step, no ROP's
CNUTS the lot of 'em.
 

ches

LE
Having a sprog is a choice & you compromise your life to suit. Fcuking parents & their righteous bullshit.

Being disabled is not a choice.
 
My partner is disabled and has to use buses, the amount of grief she's had is unreal including the threat of physical violence (threat to "mash up your face", I'll leave you to recognise the racial profile) with the actual drivers doing/saying nothing.

She ought to stand up for herself.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
There was some upset on the morning news a few weeks ago about pushchairs vs wheelchairs with a woman in a wheelchair constantly going on about how it was her right to kick out another bus user (who has paid for a service).
first come, first served works for pretty much every other part of life, so why not on a bus too?
 
Clive Coleman, legal correspondent, BBC News

The net effect of this ruling is that if someone refuses to move from that designated, disabled, wheelchair-user bay on a bus or train then that is that.

The disabled wheelchair user will simply have to wait for the next bus or train.

Doug Paulley's lawyers have already sought a leave to appeal to the supreme court, the highest court in the land, for them to make a ruling on an issue which is of enormous importance to many, many disabled people in particular.

Or matey in the wheelchair simply refuses to dismount (assuming he had got on in the first place) which means the bus is unable to proceed.

Peer pressure may well then sort out the problem.

As far as I can see it this is then 2 refusals. Who is to say the first one is any relevant than the second.

Disabled slots on public transport should be exclusively for the use of disabled persons. Mums and pushchairs are taking the piss.
 

Poppy

LE
There was some upset on the morning news a few weeks ago about pushchairs vs wheelchairs with a woman in a wheelchair constantly going on about how it was her right to kick out another bus user (who has paid for a service).
first come, first served works for pretty much every other part of life, so why not on a bus too?

yes but parents with buggies generally seem to think the world revolves around them these days :( I was brought up to give up my seat to older people-it's the complete opposite now sadly.
young parents seem to sit on the bus yakking into their phone while the poor children stare blankly into space - unless they are too young to have given up hope of a parent actually interacting with them
 
The sign should read "You must give up this space if a disabled person requires it"

That would stop all the arguments, except that of course it wouldn't as the next argument would be "which level of disablement" and all the other stuff that anyone could think of.
 

Ritch

LE
I remember after an operation on my leg, I was using crutches. I caught the bus for an appointment to hospital as I couldn't afford a taxi. I hopped on the bus and no-one gave up their seat. The driver even asked if someone would stand so I could sit - all he got was blank looks and a stony silence...

So I had to sit in the luggage rack. Quite easy to get into, quite the opposite when you get out.
 
The sign should read "You must give up this space if a disabled person requires it"

That would stop all the arguments, except that of course it wouldn't as the next argument would be "which level of disablement" and all the other stuff that anyone could think of.
The trouble is you're bringing people into the equation & people are generally pretty selfish.
Just go into any "Quiet Carriage" on the train & try to relax in the peace & tranquility.
 
I was on a train a couple of months back, very full train and I was standing in the door way as there were no seats.
An announcement over the tannoy from the ticket bloke to the effect that the front couple of carriages still have seats free.
So I took my self off towards the front of the train hoping to get a seat before we reached the next station and the train fills up even more.

At the next compartment there are these two women standing blocking the way through. I politely ask them to move over. They refuse because - they had laid their babies on the floor in the corridor and wouldn't disturb them. These two weren't asleep or anything like that just nice and comfy in a little nest of blankets.

I was polite for about another 3 or 4 repetitions of "please move over", "we can't disturb the babies" until in the end I just (fairly gently) pushed the first mum to one side and then very very carefully stepped between the little ones on the floor and went on my merry way.

For some strange reason they seemed to think that the corridor was their personal space because they had kids.
******* morons.
 
I was on a train a couple of months back, very full train and I was standing in the door way as there were no seats.
An announcement over the tannoy from the ticket bloke to the effect that the front couple of carriages still have seats free.
So I took my self off towards the front of the train hoping to get a seat before we reached the next station and the train fills up even more.

At the next compartment there are these two women standing blocking the way through. I politely ask them to move over. They refuse because - they had laid their babies on the floor in the corridor and wouldn't disturb them. These two weren't asleep or anything like that just nice and comfy in a little nest of blankets.

I was polite for about another 3 or 4 repetitions of "please move over", "we can't disturb the babies" until in the end I just (fairly gently) pushed the first mum to one side and then very very carefully stepped between the little ones on the floor and went on my merry way.

For some strange reason they seemed to think that the corridor was their personal space because they had kids.
******* morons.
Pity you weren't wearing golf shoes.
 

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