(dis)Integration of the TA into Regular Army

#1
Bob Ainsworth has made (or is making) an announcement of closer integration of the TA into the Regular Army according to Radio. It is to be discussed on 5 Live Drive shortly
 
#2
And not a bad thing - if done right. Closer integration of the TA could actually bring quite a lot of benefit to the Army - have been in a regular unit with TA embedded on the weekends, and it worked pretty well. Meant TA were actually the gurus on a particular capability, and provided the core expertise for the regulars!

I personally think that having TA Coys embedded in Reg units is not a bad idea - we just need to ensure that Reg units are a little more dispersed throughout the UK (ok, so the supergarrisons aren't with us quite yet).
 
#4
Chasing_Aimless said:
Should help take a bit of the strain off on deployments from what I can gather from the end of the radio report that I heard.
Like the 17,000 tours the TA have done?

Keep up sparky
 
#5
TA troops to be fast-tracked into overseas operations
REFORMS to the reserve armed forces will see troops in the Territorial Army "fast-tracked" to ensure they are ready to serve in overseas operations much more quickly.
Bob Ainsworth, the armed forces minister, announced in the Commons yesterday a new programme that aims to have reservists ready for mobilisation within three years.

The year-long Ministry of Defence review marks recognition of the changing role
of the TA, and aims to rid reservists of their "weekend warrior" image.

The Army is increasingly relying on reservists to swell ranks on the front line, with more than 2,000 currently on operation in Afghanistan and Iraq on tasks ranging from fighting on the frontline to force protection and medical support.

Fifteen reservists have lost their lives in action since 2003.

http://news.scotsman.com/latestnews/TA-troops-to-be-fasttracked.5214886.jp
 
#6
The Times said:
Territorial Army soldiers to be trained for quick move to front line

The Territorial Army is to be overhauled so that it can be deployed overseas more quickly, the Ministry of Defence has announced, a recognition of the military’s growing dependence on reservists in the war in Afghanistan. News of the overhaul came after months of speculation that the reserve force would be cut drastically to make savings in the defence budget.

Bob Ainsworth, the Armed Forces Minister, told Parliament yesterday that there would be no drop in numbers, but that reservists would be relieved of “burdensome training that they don’t really need to do”, making them ready for deployment within three years.

About 18,000 of Britain’s 33,000 active reservists have served in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003 and reservists make up 8 per cent of Forces deployed in theatre.

Article continued.
Emphasis added mine. That line really did just strike me as somewhat odd. Now I've not had much in the way of experience with the TA and how they're organised so could anyone shed some light on what the the "burdensome training that they don’t really need to do" might be? The only thing that sprang to mind was some of the civil contingency stuff that the MoD finally told the national and local governments that they wouldn't be bailing them out of any more IIRC.
 
#7
Brick said:
The Times said:
Territorial Army soldiers to be trained for quick move to front line

The Territorial Army is to be overhauled so that it can be deployed overseas more quickly, the Ministry of Defence has announced, a recognition of the military’s growing dependence on reservists in the war in Afghanistan. News of the overhaul came after months of speculation that the reserve force would be cut drastically to make savings in the defence budget.

Bob Ainsworth, the Armed Forces Minister, told Parliament yesterday that there would be no drop in numbers, but that reservists would be relieved of “burdensome training that they don’t really need to do”, making them ready for deployment within three years.

About 18,000 of Britain’s 33,000 active reservists have served in Iraq and Afghanistan since 2003 and reservists make up 8 per cent of Forces deployed in theatre.

Article continued.
Emphasis added mine. That line really did just strike me as somewhat odd. Now I've not had much in the way of experience with the TA and how they're organised so could anyone shed some light on what the the "burdensome training that they don’t really need to do" might be? The only thing that sprang to mind was some of the civil contingency stuff that the MoD finally told the national and local governments that they wouldn't be bailing them out of any more IIRC.
Burdensome???????? we dont do enough of any training every weekend that I'm not working in my civy job the basrurds are on standdown so if I do want to attend weekends were they indend to do something worthwile I have to book holidays to do it. and by the time they've done MATTS weekends and a few Executive stretch or some other such thing there's no ITD's left to train for our role!
 
#10
singha61 said:
TA troops to be fast-tracked into overseas operations
REFORMS to the reserve armed forces will see troops in the Territorial Army "fast-tracked" to ensure they are ready to serve in overseas operations much more quickly.
Bob Ainsworth, the armed forces minister, announced in the Commons yesterday a new programme that aims to have reservists ready for mobilisation within three years.

The year-long Ministry of Defence review marks recognition of the changing role
of the TA, and aims to rid reservists of their "weekend warrior" image.

The Army is increasingly relying on reservists to swell ranks on the front line, with more than 2,000 currently on operation in Afghanistan and Iraq on tasks ranging from fighting on the frontline to force protection and medical support.

Fifteen reservists have lost their lives in action since 2003.

http://news.scotsman.com/latestnews/TA-troops-to-be-fasttracked.5214886.jp
From walking in the TAC to first tour within 12 months not quick enough for you, you dribbling muppet?

vacuous platitudes with no real understanding of anything and a pretty powerpoint screen. I'm fairly sure something the issues talked about were mentioned in SDR
 
#11
We shouldn't lose sight of the fact that the number quoted as supporting Ops are both TA and Reservists. A significant number of those who had the pleasure of going through RTMC were ex-Regulars, some now in the TA and some not. I don't know the break-down of straight TA and ex-Regs but it would make interesting reading.

Take out the number of specialists (med, linguists, etc) and you might get a better picture of how much value we get from the traditional off the street entrant to the TA? Are formed TA platoons, companies and Bns just a structure to provide recruiting and initial training?
 
#12
Would help if anyone understood what the TA was designed to do.

The TF (1908) and TA were set up to provide formed units for Home defense and to fill out the Brigade and Divisional orbat of the Regular army at war. The TF was planned to provide 14 Divisons on mobilisation, to reinforce the 3 Cavalry Regiments and 5 Infantry battalions not sent overseas. The Post 1947 TA formed 8 Divisons. The 1979 changes formed TA Brigades to fill out Regular Divisons.

The TA is meant to provide units to bring Major level commands up to to WFE.

BCR's and IR's were always the job of the Regular Reserve, That's why most bods who leave the Armed Forces have a reserve committment to serve, during which time they can be called up without much get out.

The TA has been****ed about because the Government lost control of the regular reserves. The postion now is that this country goes to war with the regular orbat it is. AND NOTHING MORE.
 
#13
Would it be fair to describe it like this ?

'The TA used to be the equivalent of what they call the National Guard in the US. It is now the equivalent of what they call they Army Reserve'.
 
#14
I have a copy (electronically) of the report PM me if you want your eyes to bleed like mine are.
 
#15
interestednovice said:
Would it be fair to describe it like this ?

'The TA used to be the equivalent of what they call the National Guard in the US. It is now the equivalent of what they call they Army Reserve'.
No.
 
#16
I think there are one or two misconceptions about the TA. Pre WW1 the TF was the product in a surge of interetest and the military volunteer movement in the 19th C. They did indeed provide a substantial formed force. Recruiting was nowhere near as good between the wars and numbers only really went up with the 1938 Militia (?) Act that started a level of conscription.

After WW2 the TA strength of formed divisions was maintained by the obligatory service (4 years?) that a man had to perform after being discharged from full time conscripted National Service in the regular army (and RN and RAF). The last NS left in 1962 and (big surprise this) by 1966 is was clear that the TA was but a shadow of its former self. Realism was applied and the TA 'slashed' as some would have it conviently ignoring the reality that there wasn't much to slash apart from the regular element of TA units and formations (and remember there were not TA bde or div comds, they were all regs).

The 1979 increase provide two formed bdes. The rest of the TA had mobilisation roles as formed units on both sides of 1 (BR) Corps rear boundary.
 
F

fozzy

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#18
REMEbrat said:
During WW2 what were the similarities and differences between the TA and the 'Dad's Army' of the day?
I think you find that by late 1940, the bulk of the TA, as was in 1939, was either
a) Dead
b) In PoW cages
c) In North Africa
d) Manning AA units

As the then version of LSDI had been executed.
 
#19
Isn't there a danger, that if the TA are more routinely used for operations, that civilian employers are going to look at the TA as a liability rather than a bonus?
 
#20
fozzy said:
REMEbrat said:
During WW2 what were the similarities and differences between the TA and the 'Dad's Army' of the day?
I think you find that by late 1940, the bulk of the TA, as was in 1939, was either
a) Dead
b) In PoW cages
c) In North Africa
d) Manning AA units

As the then version of LSDI had been executed.
What is LSDI?

AFAIK the first mainly TA formation to serve in North Africa was the 22nd Armoured Brigade which arrived there just in time for Operation Crusader in November 1941. The 50th Division arrived in early 1942 after garrisoning Cyprus, followed by 51st Div a few months later. Several other originally TA battalions and armoured regiments had also been sent out earlier in 1941, and there may have been TA men in drafts sent to the Middle East. But the British element of Western Desert Force/13 Corps which fought the successful campaign of 1940/41 (mainly 7th Armoured Div, an infantry brigade, and various gunner, sapper etc. units) was almost entirely regular.

In late 1940 the vast majority of TA soldiers who hadn't been killed or captured in France would have been in the UK, along with most regulars and conscripts.

Of course as the war went on the differences between regular, TA and war-raised units became very blurred and in many cases pretty much disappeared altogether.
 

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