Dimensioned drawing of No.5 flash suppressor / bayonet lug

#1
Someone's asked me if I could find a dimensioned drawing of the No.5 bayonet lug, specifically. His rifle has had the lug hacked off and he'd like to restore it.

Has anyone got a drawing, or a rifle and the skills and 5 minutes to make one? Metric preferably ;)

If not, next time I go to Valais I'll take my vernier calipers and measure up a friend's rifle.
 
#3
Anyone got an "in" there? Would be better than sending an e-mail into the void.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#4
They are very good at sending out prints of SAID etc. If you get no joy there I suggest you get in touch with our friendly RFD in Derbyshire as he has made a few without the Bayonet lug.
He can source the correct bayonet too.
Alternatively weld on a lump and get filing!
 
#5
They are very good at sending out prints of SAID etc. If you get no joy there I suggest you get in touch with our friendly RFD in Derbyshire as he has made a few without the Bayonet lug.
He can source the correct bayonet too.
Alternatively weld on a lump and get filing!
That's what the guy wants to do (as in weld on a lump and get filing). he just wants to know at what point to stop filing to reveal the bayonet lug hiding inside the blob of weld :D
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#6
That's what the guy wants to do (as in weld on a lump and get filing). he just wants to know at what point to stop filing to reveal the bayonet lug hiding inside the blob of weld :D
I'd recommend a new one. They do exist but if he has the bayonet he could get by without any gauges.
 
#7
.
Alternatively weld on a lump and get filing!
Wouldn't that bend the end of the barrel? Straightening it out again may prove to be more embuggerance than it's worth.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#8
Wouldn't that bend the end of the barrel? Straightening it out again may prove to be more embuggerance than it's worth.
Wouldn't that bend the end of the barrel? Straightening it out again may prove to be more embuggerance than it's worth.
Id expect it to be removed first!
 
#9
Id expect it to be removed first!
Isn't the lug welded to the barrel of the No. 5 in the first place? (Edit; no, it isn't) If so, he might be better off fixing a lug with epoxy resin or something, unless he intends to use the bayonet. It may fall off when the barrel gets hot.

ISTR a Sterling bayonet fits it, or the MOD bayonets were from the No. 5. The big ring on the SMG bayonet seems to have been intended to use stocks of redundant No 5 bayonets. Maybe you could get the dimensions, or even a whole lug, from a scrap SMG if that's correct. They were liable to get bent. :oops:
 
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#10
Isn't the lug welded to the barrel of the No. 5 in the first place?
Nope. It's part of the flash suppressor / foresight base

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#13
I see now, I've never seen a No. 5. How is that attached to the barrel? Pressed on?

The assembly is pressed on and then pinned.

They are exceedingly hard to get on and off; many of the service replacement barrels came with them already fitted, and the reproduction ones sold in USA have an enlarged internal diameter to ease fitting (which is why, on bitsa rifles such as "Ishapore jungle carbines", the flash hider often vanishes downrange).
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#15
Isn't the lug welded to the barrel of the No. 5 in the first place? If so, he might be better off fixing a lug with epoxy resin or something, unless he intends to use the bayonet. It may fall off when the barrel gets hot.

ISTR a Sterling bayonet fits it, or the MOD bayonets were from the No. 5. The big ring on the SMG bayonet seems to have been intended to use stocks of redundant No 5 bayonets. Maybe you could get the dimensions, or even a whole lug, from a scrap SMG if that's correct. They were liable to get bent. :oops:
I've heard the opposite, the rings are slightly larger but the internet disagrees with me. I suspect the tales were to stop troops signing out the wooden handled ones instead of the black pattern.
Who knows with arms cote men being odd as they are!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#17
You can go there, its a free entry, but the obligatory parking fees are high, well worth a visit, in fact, its mind boggling, un like anything you have seen or experienced in any museum in England, Give it a whole day.
The Pattern room collection isn't open to the public. You need to book an appointment and state clearly what you are looking for. However they will send you prints of armourers drawings (SAID I think) provided you give a reasonably accurate explanation of what you are looking for.
 
#18
You can go there, its a free entry, but the obligatory parking fees are high, well worth a visit, in fact, its mind boggling, un like anything you have seen or experienced in any museum in England, Give it a whole day.
National Firearms Centre | Royal Armouries: A family of national museums of arms, armour and artillery
The NFC isn’t open to the public:
Those weapons are available to be inspected by academics and researchers who have a need to study design and technical aspects.
 
#20
I was mentioning the royal armouries museum in Leeds, main building, I went there in 2016 to join in with a presentation by Ammie Slavin. While there got the 10 cent tour with a curator.
I’ve been there and to the NFC. I’m not sure whether the Royal Armouries would be the place to ask for drawings of dimensions for a No 5 Rifle bayonet lug dimensions but the NFC would be. The NFC is located opposite the Royal Armouries.

As an aside, the flash eliminator is a component part of a firearm.
 
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