Dii and internet explorer 6 - when will we move on?

Discussion in 'Royal Signals' started by chimera, May 4, 2012.

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  1. chimera

    chimera LE Moderator

    This may not be the right forum, but there must be someone around the R Sigs community that can tell me if t here are any plans to replace the dreaded IE6 that DII uses?

    Having now had another major web site (the UK Met Office so quite useful for us!) that doesn't support IE6, we must be about the only people on the planet that have to put up with it.
     
  2. If we're doing fantasy software upgrades, an anti-virus that doesn't use two thirds of a workstation's processing power might mean that it takes less than four days to boot a computer up in the future.
     
  3. And apparently we're stuck with IE6 because of the cost of upgrading so I don't see it changing any time soon!

    (And possibly JPA won't work with IE7 too).
     
  4. It would help if, for example, i-SITE: Login to the site worked with Dii and IE6 or we binned IE6 in favour of something that works. the I-site is an essential web site for CMT 2's* to get qualified to attend their CMT 1 course and we have 3 work computers on site that can access it properly.


    *and other medically thingies.
     
  5. chimera

    chimera LE Moderator

    Thanks. IE7? I though MS were up to about IE9 and counting.

    Trouble is that (as ever) I work in an MOD establishment that has crap mobile reception so can't even use civvy iPad!
     
  6. As I understand it, yes.

    To get one of Atlas' extremely highly trained computer wizards to press download (which would obviously be well above the technical competency of a squaddie) probably costs more than the nuclear deterant.
     
  7. There is a Dii tech refresh due over the next couple of years! The pilot project is taking place in Abbeywood at the moment. We will get new UADs running Windows 7, IE8 and Office 2010. Just in time for all that to be hideously out of date and incompatible with the real world. BBC and Telegraph websites regularly crash my machine cos no-one codes for IE6 anymore.
     
  8. So going on standard MOD tech rollouts, the Army should be getting IE7 on their workstations in about 2034?
     
  9. chimera

    chimera LE Moderator

    I have long since given up the BBC website for that reason (although Al Jazeera English works OK).
     
  10. chimera

    chimera LE Moderator

    Good to see that we can still access ARRSE though! Best get back to work...... :)
     
  11. Quit whinging. I remember having a dusty Windows NT terminal that spoke to no-one on a system so bad we used to sabotage it so we could go back to paper-based admin.
     
  12. "So going on standard MOD tech rollouts, the Army should be getting IE7 on their workstations in about 2034?"

    ATLAS reckons the programme will run Jan 13 to Dec 14, so 2034 sounds about right!
     
  13. The MOD has yet again gave out millions of pounds for a system that does not fufill the requirements of the Armed Forces.
    When will they ever learn.
     
  14. Forastero

    Forastero LE Moderator

    Had that converstaion with SPOC yesterday because BBC News keeps crashing on me. Apparently Win 7 'is being tested' and IE X will be introduced at the same time. 'When?' says I, 'Don't know, sorry.', says he. Marvellous thinks I.
     
  15. The cost isn't that of upgrading IE6 to IEx in the sense of rolling it out to each workstation; that's the cheapest and easiest bit.

    Its the cost of testing it in the Dii environment, to ensure that it doesn't break anything else. And that the browser apps that use IE6 as a front end continue to work. You can bet there will be at least one key application which requires IE6, and it will not documented whether it is a simple 'check version = 6' function, or something more complex.

    Then there is cost of modelling the deployment option, such as auto-install on login (and testing this actually works, and doesn't break anything else).

    A backout plan - ie how to undo the upgrade and revert back to IE6.

    This then needs a pilot project, some 'real world' testing - both deployment, use, and rollback

    Then deployment planning; assuming that DII is capable of deployment on login, ensuring that there is no feckup assumption such as people do logout and login in daily, shared workstations are upgraded, and so on

    FINALLY, the deployment. Preferably not in the middle of a crisis.

    All of which costs money.