Difference between SF jumps and BPC

Sorry I generalised a bit - I meant the standard issue low level jump, static line harness to put a battalion down on the ground quickly.
No release mechanism, other than the centre of chest , 'twist and bang' and the harness falls to pieces.

The reason I asked about all the chaps deploying a second chute - if you are dropping in sub-optimal conditions eg rough piece of Sahel, anemometer flicking around the 20mph position, its night, you are loaded down with extra ammo/water etc,etc....... collapsing one canopy as you are being dragged rapidly over rocks and stones is unpleasant but doable.
But having a second one to deal with in these conditions - No thanks.
There was one fatality during a company-size night jump with 3 C-160R in Mali on 17 June 2017 as well as several wounded because of high winds and rough grounds. The deceased, Chasseur de 1ere classe Riveta, from 3 Coy, 1er RCP, originating from French Polynesia, was found on the ground with cardio vascular arrest and could not be resuscitated.

Because it was his first Op deployment and he had only recently completed his basic training, some questioned whether his lack of parachuting experience added to difficult conditions were not the reason for his death.

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Turned up on Hankley Common one morning for some balloon jumps.

" New kit today, lads. They are steerable ! Pull down on the Left riser toggle, you turn Left. Right, you turn Right. DO NOT pull this toggle - it disconnects the parachute. OK you four, get your kit on ! "

That kit was single shot release if memory serves, and a pretty stupid idea I thought at the time having experienced the rough and tumble of some C130 exits.
But this was a balloon day, so fairly civilised.
The harnesses were also new. Man- made nylon, very stiff, uncomfortable with edges that dug into you.

The jumps were fun, the steerability novel but as I saw it, pretty pointless for standard military low level drops.

A couple of weeks later a lad from another Unit is killed when his parachute disconnects while balloon jumping.

A few weeks later and its off to Hankley again.
Same kit - but this time all the release mechanisms had been drilled through and something ( bolt or wire ?) inserted so it could not disconnect.

I was never issued that kit again I am glad to say.
Can't remember if we used them on a couple of jumps on BPC 1977--------- but used them on tailgate jumps in unit.
There was a short strap with a toggle on the end,you pulled down then out and away from your body,the rig also had 2 lines to steer.(I know we used a nylon harness 2 times on BPC--- but it had no steering toggles)
I think the steerable canopy was 28 ft---or 24ft.
 
Can't remember if we used them on a couple of jumps on BPC 1977--------- but used them on tailgate jumps in unit.
There was a short strap with a toggle on the end,you pulled down then out and away from your body,the rig also had 2 lines to steer.(I know we used a nylon harness 2 times on BPC--- but it had no steering toggles)
I think the steerable canopy was 28 ft---or 24ft.
You got it. The action as as you describe, to pull downwards and then outwards in a flowing motion. The steering lines were florescent red with the 'handles' of a similar colour in 'rosemary beads' construction.

As the canopy release device green toggle(s) lay / dangled (?) on each side of the body harness at shoulder level,the steering handles were highlighted in red and which was necessary to reach up for and remove them from their velcro ties. Each were coloured as such to clearly identify their uses.

Whereas in one instance from a C-130 exit, one side of the canopy attachment mechanism was either activated or disengaged by other means, causing a main canopy malfunction and the subsequent death of the jumper.

There was a similar incident from a balloon descent programme, with the canopy being released. I cannot recall the specifics. Both circumstances led to the CRD toggles being neutralised for use by being folded under it's metal attachment support on the main harness, the exception being, those in use for specialist water entries.

As you remark, the system was referred to as the 28' SSL ( Steerable Static Line )
 
You got it. The action as as you describe, to pull downwards and then outwards in a flowing motion. The steering lines were florescent red with the 'handles' of a similar colour in 'rosemary beads' construction.

As the canopy release device green toggle(s) lay / dangled (?) on each side of the body harness at shoulder level,the steering handles were highlighted in red and which was necessary to reach up for and remove them from their velcro ties. Each were coloured as such to clearly identify their uses.

Whereas in one instance from a C-130 exit, one side of the canopy attachment mechanism was either activated or disengaged by other means, causing a main canopy malfunction and the subsequent death of the jumper.

There was a similar incident from a balloon descent programme, with the canopy being released. I cannot recall the specifics. Both circumstances led to the CRD toggles being neutralised for use by being folded under it's metal attachment support on the main harness, the exception being, those in use for specialist water entries.

As you remark, the system was referred to as the 28' SSL ( Steerable Static Line )
That's it. I could picture it quite clearly, Ta!
 
The EPC parachutes I mentioned a few messages ago have been used on training jumps for the first time in Africa (Ivory Coast) by the 3┬░RPIMa which has a roulement Coy over there at the moment.

 
Steerable...

 

PJI-254

Crow
With the recent change of the SF jumps cadre down to just eight descents what is the difference between this and baby para?

I assume SF is squares and not rounds and includes a night and water jump? Purely out of interest. Keep answers within the realms of Opsec please.
In Australia SF Para Cse is virtually the same, with the exception of Cdo who do added water jumps
 
In Australia SF Para Cse is virtually the same, with the exception of Cdo who do added water jumps
Two questions - * Are the courses run out of Williamstown ?
* Course duration in weeks ?
 
There was a similar incident from a balloon descent programme, with the canopy being released. I cannot recall the specifics. Both circumstances led to the CRD toggles being neutralised for use by being folded under it's metal attachment support on the main harness, the exception being, those in use for specialist water entries.
Balloon jump RAF Catterick, circa 1982[?]. 4 Para, My pal Midge - who I got to know after the fact at Topcliffe w/e skydiving club - was doing background activity with sprog paras on the scene at the time.

Midge had his back to the winch, so his squad saw the whole thing.

I gather he had some difficulty regaining their sole and undivided attention thereafter, Funny that.

The 4 Para medic who was first on the scene also jumped at Topcliffe.

I can well remember packing my Pegasus in the hangar, while he - in the accent unique to the Leeds/Bradford area - dwelt at length on the state of the remains when it was time to pack the poor sod into a body bag. . . . . I couldn't pack fast enough to get away from the tale, but on t'other hand, it's a tale that makes you want to pack reeeeaaallly careful, like :-D

ISTR the deceased was a late registrant for this annual balloon-jump-to-qual-for-your-bounty; had last jumped early in the previous qual year (this mighta been towards end of the then-current year) and professed familiarity with the kit he was going to jump (as in "Yeh yeh, I kno - don't pull the red toggle - how dim d'yer think I am lad, eh?")
 

JJWRacing

Clanker
Sorry I generalised a bit - I meant the standard issue low level jump, static line harness to put a battalion down on the ground quickly.
No release mechanism, other than the centre of chest , 'twist and bang' and the harness falls to pieces.

The reason I asked about all the chaps deploying a second chute - if you are dropping in sub-optimal conditions eg rough piece of Sahel, anemometer flicking around the 20mph position, its night, you are loaded down with extra ammo/water etc,etc....... collapsing one canopy as you are being dragged rapidly over rocks and stones is unpleasant but doable.
But having a second one to deal with in these conditions - No thanks.
We have moved on all UK military harness's are three straps and clips now, ie chest and two leg ones, the old PX had the twist and bang method of release. Some of the Africa country still do
 

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