Difference between SF jumps and BPC

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
Sorry I generalised a bit - I meant the standard issue low level jump, static line harness to put a battalion down on the ground quickly.
No release mechanism, other than the centre of chest , 'twist and bang' and the harness falls to pieces.
The current one (Low Level
Parachute (LLP)) does.
 
The previous parachute, the EPI 696-26, did. They are the two steel boxes at shoulder height on the harness. First open the box then pull on the steel wire located inside the box.

I suppose the new ones, the EPC, also do.
Capewell releases.
 
The team rode inside the airframe sat on their bergans on the flight to altitude ( 10,000' ) . On approach, they climbed out onto the skids. The tricky bits were the close helicopter formation and the coordinated release timing between the three airframes to put the jumpers all in the same air-space. It was a successful op onto the jebel.

Edit : to add, it was a night descent.
I think I read about that in Tony Geraghty’s book. Wasn’t there one fatality in the jump?
 
I think I read about that in Tony Geraghty’s book. Wasn’t there one fatality in the jump?
No, not on this one. Some five years later, there was an op into the Musandam peninsular with a fatality on the insertion.
 
Very rare [ETA, I'd never seen one before]. I remember being at Cherry Point for a very large AB exercise and the blokes in the plane were gawking (with drooling mouths) at the female jump masters. (Or should that be jump mistresses?)

One of the toms tried to give a jump master/mistress a bit of verbal and she gave him such good ripostes that the whole chalk was laughing at the guy.

The jump and jump mistress in question (she even seems to have an adam's apple):

View attachment 476073
Blast handles! Bloody hell, how old are you?

Hope she'd had the post drilled out.
 

Oyibo

LE
Blast handles! Bloody hell, how old are you?

Hope she'd had the post drilled out.
I had to google 'blast handles'. The internet told me they were banned in the US in 1968. Evidently not - the photo is from Ex Purple Star in 1996.
 
Capewell releases.
You'd call them that from your RAFSPA days. These were designed by Joe (?) Capewell and was as such considered a copyrighted design, hence ,as foreign parachute manufacturers got into gear to challenge the USA, their canopy release mechanisms were described as that. UK referred to ours as 'CRD"s / CRM's - 'Canopy Release Devices / Mechanisms'
 
Maybe US mil got a free pass on that one. Not too bad with the post drilled out but get the angle wrong with it intact and they pretty much jammed in the housing.

Even scarier, they may still be using it for the original purpose which was with some kind of timed pyro charge to activate it...
 
I had to google 'blast handles'. The internet told me they were banned in the US in 1968. Evidently not - the photo is from Ex Purple Star in 1996.
I'm merely speculating here but I think that 'blast handles' were banned in the USA sport para world.

They are quite suited to the role of despatching troops. Moving / clambering over and around troops loaded with kit, more especially during the "stand-up , check equipment phases" , having a protruding ripcord handle on a despatcher's rig can have it's moments.
The 'blast handle' design had it's plusses.
 
US designed mechanism , in a couple of variations.
Fabulous pieces of kit, just not appropriate for all parachute scenarios.
 
One shot.
One and a half shot.
Two shot
And then there was the fun innovation of Tapewells. Never really trusted them but they seemed to work OK.

You had to have a lot of faith in velcro and knicker elastic to be completely at ease with them.
 
One shot.
One and a half shot.
Two shot
Turned up on Hankley Common one morning for some balloon jumps.

" New kit today, lads. They are steerable ! Pull down on the Left riser toggle, you turn Left. Right, you turn Right. DO NOT pull this toggle - it disconnects the parachute. OK you four, get your kit on ! "

That kit was single shot release if memory serves, and a pretty stupid idea I thought at the time having experienced the rough and tumble of some C130 exits.
But this was a balloon day, so fairly civilised.
The harnesses were also new. Man- made nylon, very stiff, uncomfortable with edges that dug into you.

The jumps were fun, the steerability novel but as I saw it, pretty pointless for standard military low level drops.

A couple of weeks later a lad from another Unit is killed when his parachute disconnects while balloon jumping.

A few weeks later and its off to Hankley again.
Same kit - but this time all the release mechanisms had been drilled through and something ( bolt or wire ?) inserted so it could not disconnect.

I was never issued that kit again I am glad to say.
 

In_Twists

Clanker
Because the dispatchers on basic jumps are (predominately male) RAF (or Army) PJIs and not RAF LMs? The dispatching qual outside of PTS is unit specific. SHF loadies have para dispatch capability. Male/female is irrelevant. Anyone lobbing out of a Herc on a big battalion drop is most likely going to encounter either an RAF or APJI at the door and not the kite's loadie. Lobbing out of a Puma or Chinook, however, will be the responsibility of the loadie.
That makes sense...obliged!
 
Turned up on Hankley Common one morning for some balloon jumps.

" New kit today, lads. They are steerable ! Pull down on the Left riser toggle, you turn Left. Right, you turn Right. DO NOT pull this toggle - it disconnects the parachute. OK you four, get your kit on ! "

That kit was single shot release if memory serves, and a pretty stupid idea I thought at the time having experienced the rough and tumble of some C130 exits.
But this was a balloon day, so fairly civilised.
The harnesses were also new. Man- made nylon, very stiff, uncomfortable with edges that dug into you.

The jumps were fun, the steerability novel but as I saw it, pretty pointless for standard military low level drops.

A couple of weeks later a lad from another Unit is killed when his parachute disconnects while balloon jumping.

A few weeks later and its off to Hankley again.
Same kit - but this time all the release mechanisms had been drilled through and something ( bolt or wire ?) inserted so it could not disconnect.

I was never issued that kit again I am glad to say.
Steerables have their use. Quartering into wind and going backward on landing is easier for me than directly backward or moving forward on impact.

But then I'm a delicate little flower.
 
Close, but the canopy is round, to match the big red nose and clown shoes.
 

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