Difference between SF jumps and BPC

Sorry for the choice of words - I'm not implying that our way is the "correct way" to do things. I'm just interested in why armies do things certain ways.
No worries l had not taken it as a recommendation to align on US standards. Each nation has its own way of doing things and as long as it works.....
 
Yeah ? Can they dispatch too (got the qualification)? Didnt know that.
Yes, for the female PTI's they are awarded the brevet and remain at PTS. As for the female Airloadies, it's part of their trade skills when posted to particular squadrons who have a parachute delivery role. To add, yes they "despatch"
 

In_Twists

Clanker
Yes, for the female PTI's they are awarded the brevet and remain at PTS. As for the female Airloadies, it's part of their trade skills when posted to particular squadrons who have a parachute delivery role. To add, yes they "despatch"
Fancy. So how come none make it to Brize to PCAU or ever deploy on Bn jumps / go on exercise?
Seems a bit daft when the rumblings are to do away with an airborne capability, to then train up a load of females and never use them.
"despatch"...noted
 
Fancy. So how come none make it to Brize to PCAU or ever deploy on Bn jumps / go on exercise?
No idea as I'm long out of touch. Way back when, I was on a long ground tour away from PTS and was obliged to return for an update 'Q' annotation course in order to maintain my pay. There were 3 females on the BPC training flight.
 
I am pretty sure a whole shit load of them were on the busses behind me in 89, and also pretty sure some of them from 3/504 were somewhere floating around the periphery supporting 2/75 in 03 (before OIF but well after 3/75 OP Rhino and Alimarden 01), of course. that stayed a secret for a little while (parts still are, so it's a funny asterisk)... and they might have had a little fun since then as well.

After that 3/75 (and others) got to rack up some MFFs as well...
Please pass my apoligies to the General commanding, and all ranks 82 Airborne Division for questioning their parachuting allyness next time you see them. Thank you.
 
Please pass my apoligies to the General commanding, and all ranks 82 Airborne Division for questioning their parachuting allyness next time you see them. Thank you.
Don't forget that 82d ABN DIV is also our national holding pen for Special Operations hopefuls and wash outs.
 
So how come none make it to Brize to PCAU or ever deploy on Bn jumps / go on exercise? Seems a bit daft when the rumblings are to do away with an airborne capability, to then train up a load of females and never use them.
Because the dispatchers on basic jumps are (predominately male) RAF (or Army) PJIs and not RAF LMs? The dispatching qual outside of PTS is unit specific. SHF loadies have para dispatch capability. Male/female is irrelevant. Anyone lobbing out of a Herc on a big battalion drop is most likely going to encounter either an RAF or APJI at the door and not the kite's loadie. Lobbing out of a Puma or Chinook, however, will be the responsibility of the loadie.
 
I think actually what you're being told, but haven't the humility to recognise it, is that while it might be a capability that you absolutely don't need every day, you'll rue they day you absolutely do need it, but don't got it no more.

And BTW, I recall seeing at Staff College, a translation of the handwritten note form appreciation and outline plan for the Kolwezi job, written by the mission commander while he was in transit by air to the DZ, so quickly was that operation mobilised and deployed.

It was very much a "Move now - orders to follow" job, and an exemplary display on his part of clarity of thought, under the most extreme pressure.

(Come to think of it, I had a Kolwezi veteran in my Int Section at the original HQ ARRC - the estimable and astonishingly multilingual Cpl Phillipe Ollieusz :) )
I met a guy from that OP in the local pub--- Did NOT appear a bullshitter.
 
High altitude, hot air, heavy loads IIRC. At the time there was another bit of video made public of the pre-flight, in French only.
Interesting.
I can't remember from the video but I guess that means French military harnesses include canopy release mechanisms ?

Ours don't, btw.
 
Interesting.
I can't remember from the video but I guess that means French military harnesses include canopy release mechanisms ?

Ours don't, btw.
The previous parachute, the EPI 696-26, did. They are the two steel boxes at shoulder height on the harness. First open the box then pull on the steel wire located inside the box.

I suppose the new ones, the EPC, also do.
 
Interesting.
I can't remember from the video but I guess that means French military harnesses include canopy release mechanisms ?

Ours don't, btw.
Hopefully @medwaymud , I've interpreted your last comment correctly and I'm not totally out of date - our static-line items, do. Waterborne rigs have canopy release devices (CRDs).
 
12 jumpers from 3 Scouts? Were they stood on the skids? That sounds like a very hairy op.
The team rode inside the airframe sat on their bergans on the flight to altitude ( 10,000' ) . On approach, they climbed out onto the skids. The tricky bits were the close helicopter formation and the coordinated release timing between the three airframes to put the jumpers all in the same air-space. It was a successful op onto the jebel.

Edit : to add, it was a night descent.
 
Last edited:

Sexton Blake

Old-Salt
Very rare [ETA, I'd never seen one before]. I remember being at Cherry Point for a very large AB exercise and the blokes in the plane were gawking (with drooling mouths) at the female jump masters. (Or should that be jump mistresses?)

One of the toms tried to give a jump master/mistress a bit of verbal and she gave him such good ripostes that the whole chalk was laughing at the guy.

The jump and jump mistress in question (she even seems to have an adam's apple):

View attachment 476073
If that Ex at Cherry Point was 'EX Purple Star' in 1996 I was on it too. I distinctly remember one of the UK PARA Regt blokes kissed the US female PJI/Jumpmaster on his way out of the door.

Did not go down well at all and discipline followed for said tom. Not an urban myth.

We were gathered in and given a warning about any similar behaviour. We were also not allowed to work outside topless (Op BRONZE). We were 100% male unit at the time but either way our American hosts did not go for that 'type of thing'. Apologies for thread drift.
 
Hopefully @medwaymud , I've interpreted your last comment correctly and I'm not totally out of date - our static-line items, do. Waterborne rigs have canopy release devices (CRDs).
Sorry I generalised a bit - I meant the standard issue low level jump, static line harness to put a battalion down on the ground quickly.
No release mechanism, other than the centre of chest , 'twist and bang' and the harness falls to pieces.

The reason I asked about all the chaps deploying a second chute - if you are dropping in sub-optimal conditions eg rough piece of Sahel, anemometer flicking around the 20mph position, its night, you are loaded down with extra ammo/water etc,etc....... collapsing one canopy as you are being dragged rapidly over rocks and stones is unpleasant but doable.
But having a second one to deal with in these conditions - No thanks.
 
Top