Difference between SF jumps and BPC

Not forgetting Kolwezi,1978.
 
The US and French armies have made numerous operational jumps in the past 30 years, several of which were regular airborne units and not SF. It’s still the quickest way to insert a large number of troops, particularly in Africa where choppers often don’t have sufficient range or payload.
When was the last time that the 82nd Airborne Division carried out an operational jump. Operation Market Garden September 1944? Its not known as 'The Palace Guard' for nothing.
 

Euclid

Old-Salt
The US and French armies have made numerous operational jumps in the past 30 years, several of which were regular airborne units and not SF. It’s still the quickest way to insert a large number of troops, particularly in Africa where choppers often don’t have sufficient range or payload.
Osprey. Which can operate from a carrier.
 
My money is on seeing a cavalry charge before we see the next green Army operational parachute drop.
Probably. When they put mounted cops against crusties in Edinburgh in 2005, there were a few brown trousers as they realised that actually, massed Dobbin at speed is a fairly f***ing impressive sight if you're at the wrong end of things.

You could argue that HCMR have a secondary MACP task in crowd control? Get the Yeomanry involved, too, lots of them have horses - just remind them about Peterloo before you let them loose...
 

offog

LE
Osprey. Which can operate from a carrier.
How many troops can you put on a carrier and what heavy equipment?

A C17 could move all from a safe location with the ability to drop all its close support.

I get your point about the likelihood of a drop against a modern enemy and it would only be used if the opposition have limited AA.
 
@par avion Panama and possibly a small unit drop in Afghanistan.
Panama and Afghanistan were by the 75th Rangers, and although conventional static line, the Rangers belong to USSOCOM. There was a conventional jump in Northern Iraqi in 2003 by a battalion of the 173 Airborne Brigade based in Itatly in support of USSF, but I can't think of any by the 82nd.
 
My money is on seeing a cavalry charge before we see the next green Army operational parachute drop.
Depending how involved UK get with Op Barkhane, you may get that drop somewhat before Dobbin goes in. Les Grenouilles appear to be quite fond of the method in those parts.



No doubt @fantassin has more up to date gen.
 

Euclid

Old-Salt
Depending how involved UK get with Op Barkhane, you may get that drop somewhat before Dobbin goes in. Les Grenouilles appear to be quite fond of the method in those parts.



No doubt @fantassin has more up to date gen.
Given the option, I’ll take my chances on a horse across the Sahel rather than leaping out of a plane thanks.
 
Given the option, I’ll take my chances on a horse across the Sahel rather than leaping out of a plane thanks.
Having been on a horse twice in my life and both times having to hang on like a striken Apache, I will take the leaping out of a plane anytime thanks.

Stil, horses for courses I suppose.
 
Panama and Afghanistan were by the 75th Rangers, and although conventional static line, the Rangers belong to USSOCOM. There was a conventional jump in Northern Iraqi in 2003 by a battalion of the 173 Airborne Brigade based in Itatly in support of USSF, but I can't think of any by the 82nd.
82nd jumped at Panama
 

ABNredleg

Old-Salt
82nd jumped at Panama
Two battalions of infantry plus artillery and armor - there was also an infantry battalion already in Panama going through Jungle School. They were also inbound to Haiti when they were recalled mid-air. And don’t forget the 173rd did a multiple-battalion drop in Iraq in 2003.
The 173rd also jumped in Vietnam and the 187th did two jumps in Korea.
 
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Oh yes, Kolwezi. 42 years ago.
I feel we are clutching at straws here.
I think actually what you're being told, but haven't the humility to recognise it, is that while it might be a capability that you absolutely don't need every day, you'll rue they day you absolutely do need it, but don't got it no more.

And BTW, I recall seeing at Staff College, a translation of the handwritten note form appreciation and outline plan for the Kolwezi job, written by the mission commander while he was in transit by air to the DZ, so quickly was that operation mobilised and deployed.

It was very much a "Move now - orders to follow" job, and an exemplary display on his part of clarity of thought, under the most extreme pressure.

(Come to think of it, I had a Kolwezi veteran in my Int Section at the original HQ ARRC - the estimable and astonishingly multilingual Cpl Phillipe Ollieusz :) )
 
Given the option, I’ll take my chances on a horse across the Sahel rather than leaping out of a plane thanks.
Then - speaking as one who has tried both horse riding and parachuting, and derived substantially less pleasure from the former than the latter - you're a piss-poor judge of risk, mate, is all I can say :thumright:
 
My money is on seeing a cavalry charge before we see the next green Army operational parachute drop.
France says tally ho mofo....

2018 Mali: More than 100 French troops parachute into Menaka

2015


2013

1989
Also drops for civil assistance reasons
 

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