Diet for training

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by RetroMozza, Feb 17, 2009.

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  1. Alright guys

    I've tried searching but I'm quite useless at it so I hope this hasn't come up before.

    I'm training for selection now, I'm overweight, I'm about 13 1/2 stone at 5'10".

    I need to slim down as well as get fit.

    I know it's fairly easy, eat less move more etc etc but I struggle with lunch at work..

    What can I eat? I'm trying to avoid carbs on advice from careers officer, so that rules out sandwiches and pasta.. what else is there really?? Bear in mind I'm not made of money so can't afford expensive stuff all the time.

    Edit to add: I'm really struggling energy-wise at the minute too, sitting behind a desk all day makes me lethargic! Anything I could eat that would give me a nice boost before training on a night!
     
  2. Conflicting advise but I thought carbs where good to have at lunchtime - obviously in moderation!
    I'm eating either vegetable soup or a salad with some pasta, obviously small portions but it's working for me!
     
  3. Just soup?

    Are you not starving by 1500?

    I got told carbs are bad because your body always works them off first, so if I don't eat carbs, my body will burn off the excess fat when I excercise.
     
  4. I'm having a vegetable soup it's quite thick!

    OOOO sounds good but how the hell can you not eat Carbs unless you only eat, Meat fish and Veg?!
     
  5. It is very difficult to train and lose weight at the same time, particularly if you're not experienced at it or if you have no coach/dietician to hand. The trouble is that you have to balance eating little enough to lose weight whilst fuelling your training, which in itself can burn calories at a high rate. If your training is heavier than you're used to, you may need to eat more than you're used to in order to lose weight.

    If you have no coach, the best thing to do is to lose weight first then up the training. That way you can utilise your own knowledge of your body to advantage; ie, you know how much you need to eat to fuel a normal day's activity without gaining weight, all you need do is eat considerably less than that and bingo, energy deficit. If you're training harder than normal it is much more difficult to guage for yourself and maintain any regime for long enough.
     
  6. Do some training in the morning, like a run or something without anything more then a few cups of water in your system.

    I would then suggest having a large breakfast (eggs are good with a lean meat), and eat smaller meals throughout the day, ending up with a small meal after work (if you train after work instead/as well as am training, eat the meal earlier).

    The body has issues with dealing with carbs at waking, so have something with carbs in during lunch, but try and get the majority of them from fruits and veggies more then pasta and stay away from bread if you're trying to lose weight.
    Boiled eggs are a good snack.
    Also, cottege cheese and almonds for snacking. Good protein and good fats there. A good combination is something like whey or casein protein in yoghurt is a good healthy snack that makes you feel full.

    edit- I would also agree with dragstrip. Losing weight and getting conditioning up are two seperate things.
    You'd probably be ok with aerobic work on a calorie deficient diet though.

    If you're going to have something with a lot of carbs, have it after training, the body is better suited to dealing with carbs around that period.
     
  7. Get some food poisoning, I've lost 5kg this weekend simply due to that. :)
     
  8. Really?

    I'll ask the missus to cook tonight then :p
     
  9. The hardest thing is to get your stmach used to eating less quantity - thats why you feel empty - best remedy for that is to eat smaller portions throughout the day Personally I'm trying the following:

    bfast - cereal (special K)
    naafi break - fruit bananas good for training
    lunch - soup/pasta/ tuna sandwich
    naafi breal - nutrigrain type bar
    gym sesh
    evening meal - try a tesco light choice meal (400 cals or less) that way you dont have to work out how much food to cook and some of them are only a quid
    evening snack - lo-cal soup (50 cals) perchance a bit of wholemeal bread

    a good snack is the 0% fat greek style yogurts - if you dont like the taste add natural honey or salt and vinegar rice cakes - fruit ice-lollies ok for a snack they fill you up but aren't putting blubber on.

    plenty of water but don't overdo it

    I'm burning 1000 cals a time in the gym (thats working hard not just lazyaly pedalling on a bike watching tv) 6 times a week which takes around an hour followed by a 400m swim

    It'll be hard to get used to but try incrementally reducing the pies/pizzas etc - try eating of a smaller plate

    Overall eventually your body ll find the point where its burning more than your putting in - it just might take a couple of weeks to see the fat coming off but at least you ll be fitter and toning

    Good luck - I sympathise
     
  10. Try fruit smoothies at lunch , good whack of natural sugars, the innocent ones even have a slow burning energy one thats quite tasty. Beats eating bags of sweeties in work (did for me anywho).
     
  11. The basic advice is to eat nutrient rich water heavy food. Lean meat, tinned fish, veg from the freezer centre, oats made with water, soup, all sorts of beans....

    There's no magic lethal element in carbs. Bulky carbs (cooked rice, pasta, spuds) fill you up, simple carbs (like sugar) are a bad idea, but people get ideas in their heads. Take for example, "I avoided carbs for 3 months and lost a stone, proving that...." Proving fanny adams. Any content-restrictive diet causes dramatic weight loss - it's nearly impossible to eat enough of the "things allowed" to make up dfor the calories you've elminated.

    For any given calorie total and level of exercise it doesn't matter a damn when you eat - it's like putting petrol in a car. Doesn't matter when, just how much petrol and how far have you driven. In fact, people who worry about eating last thing at night because "it'll all turn to fat". Well, there is an energy cost involved in turning food to bodyfat and then back again. So, for any given calorie total, the best time to eat is right before bed. If you do turn it to fat you'll have to turn it back into glucose, and that will waste some energy, for any given total consumption of calories.

    If you aren't too fussy what you eat, you don't want to be starving and dizzy all the time, porridge made with water and a little splash of milk to add interest is the way forward. Tried and tested by bodybuilders, you can buy a massive bag of "Value" or "Smart Price" oats for 50p. If you let it cool before you start eating the whole experience improves dramatically. Boiling hot oats straight from the pan are torture and taste of nothing, but cooled down they are pretty palatable, and they fill you for hours because your body has to fight like hell to get the water back out of the mix.
     
  12. Guys this is great advise.

    As I said before I am eating less and making healthier choices! I actually noticed that I went out for dinner the other night and couldn't manage more than eating 3/4 a chicken breast and I was stuffed!

    Before I would have a huge baguette and a slice of cake for my lunch or some chips as well as snacks and a large dinner, I am now full up on a salad and some fruit! If I feel hungry at 1500 I have a glass of water!

    Portion sizes are key! & putting your fork and knife down whilst chewing helps too.
     
  13. spousal rant
     
  14. Its true, get a cold after aswell, had both last year, lost a stone, rebuilt my strength back up, yet not put the stone back on!!
     
  15. That will do more damage than good, as your body needs food/energy to perform. So going out for a run without any food is a bad idea, as your body can break down muscle easier than fat, so yourbody uses your muscle as a fuel, therefore you are damaging your leg muscle instead of improving them!!!!!!