Diesel-electric car

#1
Does anyone have any idea why no manufacturer has produced a diesel-electric car?

I don't mean the hybrid bastards but the real deal, a small diesel/petrol engine or gas-turbine driving the generator that actually powers the car.

Railway locomotive are powered that way so why not cars?
 
#2
Audi Duo III ? Or is that too hybrid?
 
#3
#4
Does anyone have any idea why no manufacturer has produced a diesel-electric car?

I don't mean the hybrid bastards but the real deal, a small diesel/petrol engine or gas-turbine driving the generator that actually powers the car.

Railway locomotive are powered that way so why not cars?

And the advantages of such a system are????????????????????????
Further efficiency losses and increased manufacturing costs I would say.

I'd rather see more time spent on developing smaller two-stroke diesels for use in the auto industry.
 

rampant

LE
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Book Reviewer
#5

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#6
Does anyone have any idea why no manufacturer has produced a diesel-electric car?

I don't mean the hybrid bastards but the real deal, a small diesel/petrol engine or gas-turbine driving the generator that actually powers the car.

Railway locomotive are powered that way so why not cars?
Grossly inefficient that's why, you'd need a car the size of a transit van.
 
#7
And the advantages of such a system are????????????????????????
Further efficiency losses and increased manufacturing costs I would say.

I'd rather see more time spent on developing smaller two-stroke diesels for use in the auto industry.
Perhaps, but I reckon you would get less pollution, a lot of mpg, decent speeds and no stupidly long charge times - and a small two-stroke diesel would be perfect for the job.
 
#8
#9
Grossly inefficient that's why, you'd need a car the size of a transit van.
The first computers were the size of a room - now they fit into a pocket...
 

Mr_Fingerz

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Why bother with diesel-electric when there are other options available (including svo, bio, and bioblend)?
 
#11
And the advantages of such a system are????????????????????????
Further efficiency losses and increased manufacturing costs I would say.

I'd rather see more time spent on developing smaller two-stroke diesels for use in the auto industry.
Higher low-end torque, less moving parts to go wrong, lower fuel consumption, cheaper than a hybrid, no reason for them to be more expensive than a mechanical drive-train...
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
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#12
It's still a hybrid. My suggestion is for an electric drive 100% of the time.
Eh? I'm not sure what you're driving at.

Does anyone have any idea why no manufacturer has produced a diesel-electric car?

I don't mean the hybrid bastards but the real deal, a small diesel/petrol engine or gas-turbine driving the generator that actually powers the car.
:
Railway locomotive are powered that way so why not cars?
The C-X75 has four electric motors on each wheel, powered by a Lithium Ion battery, the turbines are used to create power to recharge the batteries and power the electric motors. Look at the third video on the link:

[video=youtube;V6GK3qdqv20]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=V6GK3qdqv20[/video]

At 5.10 onward it describes how the drive train works.

Jaguar C-X75 concept (2010) diesel electric supercar | Automotive & Motoring News | Car Magazine Online The concept has been trialled before in the 1970s by American and Japanese car makers. But the C-X75 has a different take on turbine power, using the jets to charge the batteries in a range-extender fashion like the Chevy Volt; they rarely drive the four wheels, but can be called upon to provide more electricity for the four 145kW motors.

Each of the four electric motors nestles in the wheel hub (each weighs just 50kg) and the supercar element of the C-X75 becomes apparent when you look at the claimed performance figures: there’s 780bhp on tap and a frankly bonkers 1578lb ft. Figures we’re slowly getting used to in this electric age.

And here’s the clever bit: the batteries are charged by the pair of tiny turbines, which spin independently or in sequence at up to 80,000rpm to deliver a more modest 95bhp each and consequently are responsible – claims Jaguar – for just 28g/km of CO2. Clean, rabid fast performance? Yes please.
 
#13
Higher low-end torque, less moving parts to go wrong, lower fuel consumption, cheaper than a hybrid, no reason for them to be more expensive than a mechanical drive-train...
Higher low-end torque, only if using a big torquy electric motor.
less moving parts to go wrong.........??? Diesel engine, driving generator, driving electric motors driving the wheels, speed controls........at least as many moving parts, possibly more & more things to go wrong!
lower fuel consumption,...........?????????? How? lots more mechanical & electrical losses, therefore more power required to achieve what a conventional diesel/mechanical drive would require; therefore less overall efficience, less fuel efficiency.
More weight!

Nope still no advantage on small diesel two stroke with conventional drive.

Gas turbines.........very fuel inefficient compared to conventional internal combustion engines. so another no there.
 
#15
Higher low-end torque, only if using a big torquy electric motor.
less moving parts to go wrong.........??? Diesel engine, driving generator, driving electric motors driving the wheels, speed controls........at least as many moving parts, possibly more & more things to go wrong!
lower fuel consumption,...........?????????? How? lots more mechanical & electrical losses, therefore more power required to achieve what a conventional diesel/mechanical drive would require; therefore less overall efficience, less fuel efficiency.
More weight!

Nope still no advantage on small diesel two stroke with conventional drive.

Gas turbines.........very fuel inefficient compared to conventional internal combustion engines. so another no there.
Electric motors have more low-end torque than equivalent power output dirt burners.
No gearbox, no clutch = less moving parts. And lighter.
More fuel efficient as engine is turning at peak performance, not constantly accelerating and decelerating. Higher low-end torque also helps here.

These are some of the reasons diesel-electric trains are diesel-electric, not just diesel. Lots of very heavy industrial machines are also diesel-electric, as are an increasing number of water-borne vessels of all sizes.
 
#17
No you don't. There is only one type of propulsion in diesel-electric and the lack of a gearbox and clutch reduces the weight significantly.
Thanks, ottar, your explanations are much more cogent than mine.
 
#19
More fuel efficient as engine is turning at peak performance, not constantly accelerating and decelerating.
The only diesel-electric vehicle I have served on (a big grey ship) had to increase or decrease the power of the generators when more power was needed by the motors. I imagine that trains work in the same way (btw diesel-electric trains are only cost effective because of the track electrification programme). For a car to keep its diesel engine running at a constant speed, it would need a huge array of batteries - which rather spoils the point doesn't it?

Diesel-Electric cars are yet another example of a technology which is possible, but not practical.

(I'm not an engineer by trade, but I do know a thing or two about alternative energy)
 
#20
It's still a hybrid. My suggestion is for an electric drive 100% of the time.
which is a 'series hybrid' or 'electric vehicle with range extending engine' without the emission or stored powered benefits of series hybrid a IC engine - electric hybrid is not viable at car or even LGV scale - even diesel multiple units on the railway and heavy plant use diesel- mechanic or diesel hydraulic ...
 

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