Diddums then

#1
Just heard that a paramedic at the 7/7 inquiry said that the fire service seemed a bit rude, FFS. It's a funny thing that when things are coming on top people can react in ways that may seem rude. But is it necessary to play out all the dented egos in public enquiry. These comments made are rarely meant as personal attacks but are often reactions to the situation.
For example, "I say Rifleman Blogs would you mind passing me that belt of 7.62 ball for the general purpose machine gun as we are running woefully short of rounds"
Or the tried and tested"chuck me another belt you deaf Cnut"

I know which one conveys the message with the urgency required, it's not personal but if you want we can sort it over a chilled Stella
 
#3
The whole event suffered from a lack of training with other agencies. I've seen this happen on a few occasions during national contingency training with other agencies.
 
#4
Good job they weren't on strike never mind a little rude.
 
#5
It would help if you knew what the f@ck you are going on about and not make yourself look as f@king thick as said firemen

BBC News - Aldgate firefighters were 'hostile', 7/7 inquests hear

FFS the medic had 22 years experiance, and knew what to do
You may be right, I may be thick and not made my point well, I am sure the medic was a top bloke and the likley hood is that the firemen who were hostile were also top blokes, but for whatever reason comments were passed that would not have been passed if all were operating inside their comfort Zone such as a car accident with entrapment. But for most involved it was a once in a life time incident and the scum press are happy to feed off this and make bad hay to sell papers. There are many operational lessons to be learned like why we could not speak to each other on the radio, why people did not know how to use certain kit. But good manners and a friendly disposition are not high on the list
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
I can remember the same thing happening in Ulster, and only a very stupid new fireman would not know that the first medics on a major incident are there to carry out Triage and assesment, and not cut and run with the first victim they come across who may not be that injured, its a shit job for the paramedic as they quite literally have to play God and decide who lives and who gets left until last, I hope you never find yourself in a similar situatuion, I did once and still have the nightmares
 
#7
The whole event suffered from a lack of training with other agencies. I've seen this happen on a few occasions during national contingency training with other agencies.
Very true, although there were regular exercises involving all the services, with scenarios revolving around the Underground.

In my experience as a paramedic Trumpton could be a very mixed blessing. Useful to hold IVs and give reassurance, but given to delusions of more skills than their first aid training gave them; they were never slow to give advice, though invariably declined offers by ambulance staff to show them how to put out fires. On the other hand they are very good indeed at extrication and so on.

It would be interesting to know if, in the five years since the incident, the services have gone through the lessons identified and done anything to resolve the issues.

Sean Clarke, the first senior firefighter to arrive at Aldgate, told the inquests there was a misunderstanding about the role of the initial paramedics on the scene.

He said: "We are always taught about the golden hour, how to get people out of a situation and get them care as quickly as possible within the first hour.

"And, naively perhaps, we think that the ambulance service are there to do that, to ferry them off and get them away from the situation."
...just as the public, naively perhaps, expect the fire service to be there when needed, rather than on strike.
 
#8
You are right, it is a shit job I have worked alongside them for 26 years and often thought that exact thought. But I still think the he said she said stuff should be dealt with by way of wet debrief in the pub.
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
You are right, it is a shit job I have worked alongside them for 26 years and often thought that exact thought. But I still think the he said she said stuff should be dealt with by way of wet debrief in the pub.
I totally agree, and having it out in court is only going to make the emergency service look incompetant " The protected must never know what the protectors do" comes to mind.
 
#10
I totally agree, and having it out in court is only going to make the emergency service look incompetant " The protected must never know what the protectors do" comes to mind.
Good we agree, which I hope makes me not thick, I will never be a brain surgeon though, but what the fcuk I never needed to be.
 

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