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Did you really need 22 years service to get a pension prior to 1975?

I did just over 12 years and was aware that I would get a pension at age 60. What I was not aware of was that it was not automatic, so I had a word with an ex-RAF mate who was already drawing his AF pension and who talked me through what to do. I got a tidy lump sum and a couple of grand a year. The irony was that I was earning well in my civvie job so did not really need the money but took it anyway. What I did not realise was that it was paid gross and just after I retired I got a 'we have reviewed your Tax History' from the Inland Revenue and ended up having to pay a couple of grand from my tax allowance to make it up.
 
I joined at 16 and left at 28, thus I served for 12 years, however for pension purposes I only completed 10 years. I left with a preserved pension of £650 to trigger at my 60th birthday (wow!!)

New legislation came in sometime in the 80's (can't remember what is was called) which enabled my preserved wealth(!) to be transferred to a company pension scheme as extra years(?).

I now have a small, but comfortable, monthly pension which far exceeds the preserved pension pot of £650 a year
 
In that way:

Having left the service in 1969 and started work with a Secret Spy Base, I was told that my nine years with the colours would not count for my civil service pension, but I could buy those years, which I did, subsequently, a new rule came out and anyone joining after army service in 1972, their years would count as part of the Civil Service pension.

Interestingly, a fellow I worked with (Ex RAF), through open University got himself a teaching degree and went on to be a teacher. Him being new and with an Open University degree, he was looked down upon by the incumbents, until they found that his civil service time meant he did not have to start on the low pay scale, but at the top .

Cirta Cito.
 
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When I joined the Met Police in 1987 I carried over nine and a half years of my army service into my police pension and so only had to complete 20 years for a 30 year pension. This was only for service after 1974 when the rules changed. I was 18 in 1973 when my colour service towards pension started and so I lost a year, although joining in 1971 as a boy soldier at 15 at JLRRE Dover, so those three years don't count.

There were a couple of old boys on my first Relief, one ex RAF and the other ex RN who had completed 9 years from the mid sixties until the early seventies who were unable to carry over any military service which pissed them off.

A few years back a read about a BTP PC who was in the same position who was taking legal action about it, although on what grounds I don't know. I never heard any more about it, so I presume his case got thrown out.
 

syrup

LE
There was a thing on recently, something like Back In Time For The Factory. Made exactly this point, and explained how factory owners pulled every trick in the book to get round it and the Sex Equality Act.

There's some good books out there about the Rowntree family of York the Chocolate makers
Often spoke of in revered tones of how they introduced the pension, built houses and swimming pools and a park in memoriam to the war dead.

Load of rubbish really he clocked early on that the elder workers who were all men were slower in carrying sacks of coco beans so took a couple of pence off all the workers to pension them off and replace them with younger men.
Same with the park got all the staff to chip in so they could have a park to remember the war dead called it Rowntree Park after himself.
Built on land that managed to stop his competitor Terry's of York building on and expanding.

It's always been a con for some.
 
Not given the choice it was 3, 6 or 9 IIRC
Wasn't that the initial commitment, if you picked 6 or 9 you got payed more A, B or C rates of pay. If you left after 3 ,6 or 9 the balance of colour service was reserve liability up to the 12 year point. If you stayed past your initial commitment you went onto a 1 year notice engagement. Something like that, it was a long time ago! I signed for 9 and stayed for 38.
 
There's some good books out there about the Rowntree family of York the Chocolate makers
Often spoke of in revered tones of how they introduced the pension, built houses and swimming pools and a park in memoriam to the war dead.

Load of rubbish really he clocked early on that the elder workers who were all men were slower in carrying sacks of coco beans so took a couple of pence off all the workers to pension them off and replace them with younger men.
Same with the park got all the staff to chip in so they could have a park to remember the war dead called it Rowntree Park after himself.
Built on land that managed to stop his competitor Terry's of York building on and expanding.

It's always been a con for some.

Do you have a link for any of that?
 
Wasn't that the initial commitment, if you picked 6 or 9 you got payed more A, B or C rates of pay. If you left after 3 ,6 or 9 the balance of colour service was reserve liability up to the 12 year point. If you stayed past your initial commitment you went onto a 1 year notice engagement. Something like that, it was a long time ago! I signed for 9 and stayed for 38.
That's what I did. Signed on for 9 and just carried on. Did transfer to VEng in 2007 but signed off in 2010, my 21-year point. Did 22.5 years in the end.

ETA: wasn't the 3, 6, 9 bit known as Open Engagement? You didn't have to do anything to carry on, just not put your papers in; and if you hit the 12-year point that's when you got your Re-engagement (REN) Leave.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 
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