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Did you really need 22 years service to get a pension prior to 1975?

Saw this on FB and was wondering if he's right...

Please, also take time to appreciate that not all veterans are treated the same. Those of us who completed our service prior to April 1975, are not entitled to any pension unless we completed a full 22 years for those below commissioned rank, and 16 years for commissioned officers, have no pension rights. Many served in Britains small wars, and many gave their lives.
 
It's nothing specific to the armed forces either, it was applicable to most occupational pensions, pension changes were/are linked to Social Security legislation. Changes requiring schemes to have preserved pensions for those who didn't make the immediate pension point were in the 1973 (I think) Social Security Act, to be enacted by April 1975. Initially you had to have a minimum of 5 years service and be at least aged 25 to qualify, later changes reduced the minimum service to 2 years and removed the age restrictions.
 

Dad 7419

Swinger
It's nothing specific to the armed forces either, it was applicable to most occupational pensions, pension changes were/are linked to Social Security legislation. Changes requiring schemes to have preserved pensions for those who didn't make the immediate pension point were in the 1973 (I think) Social Security Act, to be enacted by April 1975. Initially you had to have a minimum of 5 years service and be at least aged 25 to qualify, later changes reduced the minimum service to 2 years and removed the age restrictions.

Not for me they didnt. April 83 to Nov 87 and not a bean. I was told i had to do 6 to have even started to qualify.
 
I only wish the bod in the CIO had said to me 'If I were you lad, I'd sign on for 22... and here is why.'
 
Not for me they didnt. April 83 to Nov 87 and not a bean. I was told i had to do 6 to have even started to qualify.

It was 5 since 18th birthday, but you had to be 25. So if you joined on your 18th, and left at 23, you were SOL, even though you did 5. Or joined as a junior, turned 18 and started accrue time, you could feasibly have to be in green for 9 years before you qualified, assuming you joined at 16 as a junior.
 
Bit of a bugger as a 16 year old joining up , as were about 200 others in 1980. Had no idea that the next 2 1/2 years working, paying tax and NI contributions would add up to fucc all on my pension.

Serving 27 years and getting a pension for only 24 1/2 served is , was a bit of a bugger as in the last years I started to read,learn and invest.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
It's nothing specific to the armed forces either, it was applicable to most occupational pensions, pension changes were/are linked to Social Security legislation. Changes requiring schemes to have preserved pensions for those who didn't make the immediate pension point were in the 1973 (I think) Social Security Act, to be enacted by April 1975. Initially you had to have a minimum of 5 years service and be at least aged 25 to qualify, later changes reduced the minimum service to 2 years and removed the age restrictions.
There was a thing on recently, something like Back In Time For The Factory. Made exactly this point, and explained how factory owners pulled every trick in the book to get round it and the Sex Equality Act.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Not for me they didnt. April 83 to Nov 87 and not a bean. I was told i had to do 6 to have even started to qualify.
I joined in 1975. Twice, flouncing after 88 days in the RMP the first time. I know it was 88 days, because my Pension Statement said so and added them to my 14 years.
 
Not for me they didnt. April 83 to Nov 87 and not a bean. I was told i had to do 6 to have even started to qualify.

Shit happens!

The Social Security Act 1973 introduced for the first time, for those who left after April 1975, a right to a deferred pension. This was initially restricted to those who were over the age of 25 and had completed at least five years’ pensionable service. The age requirement was subsequently removed by the Social Security Act 1985, taking effect from 1 January 1986, and the five-year period was reduced to two years from 6 April 1988 by section 10 of the Social Security Act 1986.

 
Bit of a bugger as a 16 year old joining up , as were about 200 others in 1980. Had no idea that the next 2 1/2 years working, paying tax and NI contributions would add up to fucc all on my pension.

Serving 27 years and getting a pension for only 24 1/2 served is , was a bit of a bugger as in the last years I started to read,learn and invest.

I joined at 17 in 1977, so for pension purposes did 'a year for the Queen', most pension schemes had a minimum age of 18, so AFPS again was not unique. Fortunately I was still serving in 2005 so took advantage of the Offer to Transfer (to AFPS2005) which allowed you to transfer any service prior to age 18 into the pension, which meant when I retired at 55 I got the full 38 years.
 
Please, also take time to appreciate that not all veterans are treated the same. Those of us who completed our service prior to April 1975, are not entitled to any pension unless we completed a full 22 years for those below commissioned rank, and 16 years for commissioned officers, have no pension rights. Many served in Britains small wars, and many gave their lives
Absolutely right -
Not even a preserved pension.
The exception was the Gurkhas who received an immediate pension after only 15 years service.
But they were/are happy to let the public believe that they were hard done by compared with their British recruited contemporaries.
 
Saw this on FB and was wondering if he's right...

Please, also take time to appreciate that not all veterans are treated the same. Those of us who completed our service prior to April 1975, are not entitled to any pension unless we completed a full 22 years for those below commissioned rank, and 16 years for commissioned officers, have no pension rights. Many served in Britains small wars, and many gave their lives.

For which they were paid for.

TACOs change all the time.
 
I've never really thought about this. I did 12 years, came out in 86. Is that pensionable? I only wonder and even if I could I don't think I would claim.
 

Donny

ADC
I've never really thought about this. I did 12 years, came out in 86. Is that pensionable? I only wonder and even if I could I don't think I would claim.
Unless you spent a substantial proportion of those 12 years in nick then I think it probably is pensionable
 
I've never really thought about this. I did 12 years, came out in 86. Is that pensionable? I only wonder and even if I could I don't think I would claim.

Depending on your rank it will probably be a few thousand a year
 
Once got 7 days nick for mixing our dates up, after a great weekend in Hannover we thought we arrived back on Monday morning when in actual fact it was now Tuesday morning. It was a very easy mistake to make but unfortunately the badge didn't see it that way.

Other than that I kept my nose clean or didn't get caught and left as a Sergeant.

Can a pension be paid into any US bank account of my choosing?
 

Forces Pension Society

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There is an article on pensions if you live abroad in the magazine at link. Might be of use .....


Regarding the original question, the chart attached shows how AFPS pension criteria has changed over the years
 

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  • Armed Forces Pension Scheme Members’ Preserved Pension Entitlements.doc
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I only wish the bod in the CIO had said to me 'If I were you lad, I'd sign on for 22... and here is why.'

Indeed. I joined at just the right time at the back end of 1971 while still 17 so my reckonable service began on my 18th birthday 3 months later.
On discharge I was presented with an A4 sized letter explaining how to claim my pension at the age of 60. WTF I thought, that's never going to be of any use to me. Still in my twenties so 60 might as well have been a made up number.
Luckily I ditched my first wife shortly after discharge and my new girl sorted through all my paperwork and realised the importance of this scrap of paper that somehow had to be preserved for the next 32 years.
And preserved it was. As my 60th birthday fast approached I read the letter and started the claims procedure.
Within a couple of weeks of reaching 60 I had a lump sum of over £8k and a smallish pension of around £2500 pa. Not a fortune I know but it kept my head above water for a while.
The moral of the story is get the best advice about pensions as early as possible. One day most of us reach pensionable age and to be left without a pot to piss in in the autumn of our lives is unthinkable.
 

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