Did George Brown and the Labour Government unleash the present gambling explosion in Britain.

#1
It is a known fact that gambling can quickly become a dangerous addiction that can effect men and women young and old.

There has in the last decade been an absolute explosion of online gambling of every kind. TV advertising promising ‘free’ cash is relentless. The Government had previously limited television ads to only National Lottery, Bingo, and football pools. A new Gambling Act in 2007 relaxed all of those restrictions. By 2013, the UK media regulator Ofcom reported that this had led to a six-fold increase in the number of gambling ads that were aired on the TV.

Who was responsible for unleashing this growing menace? Was it Labour, or has it been a simple combination of circumstance? There have been fingers pointed.
Labour gambles away its principles
Has Brown unleashed gambling menace?
BBC SPORT | Brown scraps betting duty

Can anything be done to reverse this trend?
Should anything be done?
 
#2
No and No.
However you seem to have a big issue with gambling so why don't you air your grievances and let everyone know why it is a growing menace.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Who's George Brown? And why are you quoting stories from over a decade and a half ago?
 
#5
Who's George Brown? And why are you quoting stories from over a decade and a half ago?
The late senior Labour politician for whom the phrase 'tired and emotional' was invented is the only one who springs to mind...

[Sec of State for Economic Affairs and then Foreign Secretary in the Wilson administration of 1964-70 for younger Arrsers. Also deputy leader of the Labour Party and the man to whom the following apocryphal tale refers:

George Brown, bored at yet another diplomatic reception had alleviated his irritation by getting well lubricated (as usual). Suddenly, the band struck up and, spotting a vision of loveliness in red on the other side of the room, Brown swayed over and asked if he could have the pleasure of a dance. He got the reply, 'I am most flattered, Foreign Secretary, but I think not on two grounds. First, the tune you seem to have mistaken for a waltz is in fact the national anthem of Peru, and second, I am the Cardinal Archbishop of Lima'

The fact that the story is entirely believable tells you quite a lot about him...]
 
#6
The late senior Labour politician for whom the phrase 'tired and emotional' was invented is the only one who springs to mind...

[Sec of State for Economic Affairs and then Foreign Secretary in the Wilson administration of 1964-70 for younger Arrsers. Also deputy leader of the Labour Party and the man to whom the following apocryphal tale refers:

George Brown, bored at yet another diplomatic reception had alleviated his irritation by getting well lubricated (as usual). Suddenly, the band struck up and, spotting a vision of loveliness in red on the other side of the room, Brown swayed over and asked if he could have the pleasure of a dance. He got the reply, 'I am most flattered, Foreign Secretary, but I think not on two grounds. First, the tune you seem to have mistaken for a waltz is in fact the national anthem of Peru, and second, I am the Cardinal Archbishop of Lima'

The fact that the story is entirely believable tells you quite a lot about him...]
I just really hope that tale is true.
 
#7
It is a known fact that gambling can quickly become a dangerous addiction that can effect men and women young and old.

There has in the last decade been an absolute explosion of online gambling of every kind. TV advertising promising ‘free’ cash is relentless. The Government had previously limited television ads to only National Lottery, Bingo, and football pools. A new Gambling Act in 2007 relaxed all of those restrictions. By 2013, the UK media regulator Ofcom reported that this had led to a six-fold increase in the number of gambling ads that were aired on the TV.

Who was responsible for unleashing this growing menace? Was it Labour, or has it been a simple combination of circumstance? There have been fingers pointed.
Labour gambles away its principles
Has Brown unleashed gambling menace?
BBC SPORT | Brown scraps betting duty

Can anything be done to reverse this trend?
Should anything be done?
If you look a little harder you will find Two Jags, while under Blair, possibly seeing it as his pension plan. Blair eventually put him under house arrest, of sorts, after a series of embarrassing gaffs, but Prescott still managed to visit the casino king several times.

Two Jags and the billionaire

The main excuse they used for scrapping the original act was the age of that legislation, however, the original laws were common sense and brought in for good purpose, for example, so that punters could not be filled with booze and then fleeced, and to crimp the crime gangs action. A gambling debt, even incurred in licensed premises, was not legal under the old legislation.
 
#9
Who was responsible for unleashing this growing menace? Was it Labour, or has it been a simple combination of circumstance? There have been fingers pointed.[/QUOTE]

Gambling. like alcohol addiction has been a problem for 100's of years.

Of course there have been fingers pointed. In today's f@cked up World it is always someone else's fault or someone else to blame.

How many people nowadays have even heard of the old adage '' You can lead a horse to water, but you cannot make it drink it ''
 
#12
I know a bloke who is a solicitor. He tells me that when the gambling laws were relaxed, companies like Ladbrokes and William Hill employed top of the range lawyers to exploit the new legislation.

The types of lawyers who were previously representing merchant banks in the City started appearing in provincial magistrates' courts to challenge councils' decisions to refuse a licence for a new bookies' shop. The council's duty solicitor had no chance against the legal profession's apex predators.

The result is that bookies' shops on the High Street have multiplied like Catholic rabbits in a Viagra factory.

I think there is a specific problem with the slot machines that you get in betting shops. Guido Fawkes writes a fair bit about these machines. Apparently you can put 100 quid into the machine and lose the lot within seconds.

Some people are addicted to gambling. I was once in Macau, then a Portuguese colony near Hong Kong. Gambling was illegal in Hong Kong but not in Macau. In a "VIP room" in one of the casinos, I saw Chinese blokes bet HK$100,000, about ten thousand quid, on the turn of a card. Higher or lower than the last card. Red or black.

Around the town were pawn shops where people who had lost everything sold their possessions to get the ferry fare back to Hong Kong. Among the cameras, coats and watches, one pawn shop had an artificial leg in the window. I hope that was a joke.

Gambling is like drinking. No problem for most of us but, for some, it will destroy their lives. It needs to be regulated in the same way as booze. Anybody who will put 100 pounds into a slot machine and risk the lot with the press of a button has something wrong with them and needs to be protected.
 
#13
About a quarter of the thieves I deal with claim they are stealing to fund gambling.
 
#14
I know a bloke who is a solicitor. He tells me that when the gambling laws were relaxed, companies like Ladbrokes and William Hill employed top of the range lawyers to exploit the new legislation.

The types of lawyers who were previously representing merchant banks in the City started appearing in provincial magistrates' courts to challenge councils' decisions to refuse a licence for a new bookies' shop. The council's duty solicitor had no chance against the legal profession's apex predators.

The result is that bookies' shops on the High Street have multiplied like Catholic rabbits in a Viagra factory.

I think there is a specific problem with the slot machines that you get in betting shops. Guido Fawkes writes a fair bit about these machines. Apparently you can put 100 quid into the machine and lose the lot within seconds.

Some people are addicted to gambling. I was once in Macau, then a Portuguese colony near Hong Kong. Gambling was illegal in Hong Kong but not in Macau. In a "VIP room" in one of the casinos, I saw Chinese blokes bet HK$100,000, about ten thousand quid, on the turn of a card. Higher or lower than the last card. Red or black.

Around the town were pawn shops where people who had lost everything sold their possessions to get the ferry fare back to Hong Kong. Among the cameras, coats and watches, one pawn shop had an artificial leg in the window. I hope that was a joke.

Gambling is like drinking. No problem for most of us but, for some, it will destroy their lives. It needs to be regulated in the same way as booze. Anybody who will put 100 pounds into a slot machine and risk the lot with the press of a button has something wrong with them and needs to be protected.
One thing I've always noticed about the gamblers who are hanging outside the betting shop having a smoke, they never seem to be well off. Then the local news leads with a story about some woman fleecing the company she worked for as accounts manager, and all to fund her gambling habit.
 
#15
I know a bloke who is a solicitor. He tells me that when the gambling laws were relaxed, companies like Ladbrokes and William Hill employed top of the range lawyers to exploit the new legislation.

The types of lawyers who were previously representing merchant banks in the City started appearing in provincial magistrates' courts to challenge councils' decisions to refuse a licence for a new bookies' shop. The council's duty solicitor had no chance against the legal profession's apex predators.

The result is that bookies' shops on the High Street have multiplied like Catholic rabbits in a Viagra factory.

I think there is a specific problem with the slot machines that you get in betting shops. Guido Fawkes writes a fair bit about these machines. Apparently you can put 100 quid into the machine and lose the lot within seconds.

Some people are addicted to gambling. I was once in Macau, then a Portuguese colony near Hong Kong. Gambling was illegal in Hong Kong but not in Macau. In a "VIP room" in one of the casinos, I saw Chinese blokes bet HK$100,000, about ten thousand quid, on the turn of a card. Higher or lower than the last card. Red or black.

Around the town were pawn shops where people who had lost everything sold their possessions to get the ferry fare back to Hong Kong. Among the cameras, coats and watches, one pawn shop had an artificial leg in the window. I hope that was a joke.

Gambling is like drinking. No problem for most of us but, for some, it will destroy their lives. It needs to be regulated in the same way as booze. Anybody who will put 100 pounds into a slot machine and risk the lot with the press of a button has something wrong with them and needs to be protected.
The law on Fixed odds machines is to change next month.Down from £100.00 to £2.00.Online casinos taxation will rise from 15% to 21% at the same time This is designed to make up the tax shortfall from the restrictions on FOBTs.
Government makes U-turn over delay to £2 FOBT maximum stake
 
#16
About a quarter of the thieves I deal with claim they are stealing to fund gambling.
How does that compare with those saying they are funding drink or drug habits? If that level of shoplifting is seen elsewhere, then that shows how short sighted the politicians were, just as they were with introducing laws to allow all day drinking.
 
#17
The old saw is as true today as ever, you never see a poor bookie.

Of all the "entertainments" available to man gambling is amongst the most pernicious, verging on the evil.
 
#18
FOBT - the clue is in the name Fixed Odds. The odds being about 1% IIRC.

I watched an old bloke (who did not appear well off) buying £30 worth of scratch cards in the local supermarket last week.

Our local small town high street has no less than 4 betting shops.

The despair of hoping that you will hit lucky and be happy ever after. The old lottery (before they added the extra balls) had 14.7 Million to one odds of you winning the £1m jackpot.

Haven't bought a lottery ticket for over 25 years. Have never been in a betting shop, nor bet online.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
One thing I've always noticed about the gamblers who are hanging outside the betting shop having a smoke, they never seem to be well off. Then the local news leads with a story about some woman fleecing the company she worked for as accounts manager, and all to fund her gambling habit.
There was a saying, “you never see a poor bookie”. Not that may independent bookies left now as the big boys have been able to offer so many more ways as to how you can lose your money.
A month or so ago I read somewhere about the 10 biggest tax payers in The UK. At number 2 was the founder of Bet 365, I think that’s the company, any way she set up this business in her shed and now it’s worth £millions. A very clever woman who has taken advantage of the new laws as well as a lot of very stupid people.
That slogan, “when the fun stops, stop.”. Should read”when the bailiff calls, it’s too late”
 
#20
It is a known fact that gambling can quickly become a dangerous addiction that can effect men and women young and old.

There has in the last decade been an absolute explosion of online gambling of every kind. TV advertising promising ‘free’ cash is relentless. The Government had previously limited television ads to only National Lottery, Bingo, and football pools. A new Gambling Act in 2007 relaxed all of those restrictions. By 2013, the UK media regulator Ofcom reported that this had led to a six-fold increase in the number of gambling ads that were aired on the TV.

Who was responsible for unleashing this growing menace? Was it Labour, or has it been a simple combination of circumstance? There have been fingers pointed.
Labour gambles away its principles
Has Brown unleashed gambling menace?
BBC SPORT | Brown scraps betting duty

Can anything be done to reverse this trend?
Should anything be done?
You little tinker, are you just creating an (outdated) debate so you can step in and hey-presto announce that Labour will do something about it all?

Labour to push for stricter online gambling regulations

Not sure how clamping down on it and the reduction in tax income reconciles with Labour's magic money tree

PS. I feel really dirty linking The Grauniad
 

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