Did Britain's Commando heroes die in vain?

Whatever plans had been laid for their intended deployment were chucked out of the window at very little notice (one presumes, from the timing, because of the acute manpower shortage that arose during the beachhead fighting and led to at least RA and RAF ack Ack gunners by the thousand being re-badged Infantry around that time)
And Royal Marines as well. Par Avion senior was an 18 year old Royal Marine on Landing Craft. After D Day his flotilla sailed to the Far East in January 1945 on HMS Persimmon, based in India for the Amphibous Assault on Rangoon and then preparing for OP Zipper the invasion of Malaya before VJ put a stop to matters. He said that a lot of RM's who weren't Commando's were combed out for transfer to the Infantry, not just LC hands. Wartime strengh of the Royal Marines reached 100,000.
 

QRK2

LE
Tell me more of this Ladd bloke.

Wot I know is that my Grandad entered Europe in Sept 1944 as an Indep Inf Bde, (Army Troops) part of the Canadian Army, and wound up at Buxtehude (occupying the Kriegsmarin HQ facilities, from which I have a few looted schnappsglaser) at VE day.

Whatever plans had been laid for their intended deployment were chucked out of the window at very little notice (one presumes, from the timing, because of the acute manpower shortage that arose during the beachhead fighting and led to at least RA and RAF ack Ack gunners by the thousand being re-badged Infantry around that time)

James D Ladd, the book in question is The Royal Marines 1919-1980, An authorised history.

There's more in the main body but these annexes may be of interest and I note isn't quite the same re LC crews as what I took from the main body.
 

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James D Ladd, the book in question is The Royal Marines 1919-1980, An authorised history.

There's more in the main body but these annexes may be of interest and I note isn't quite the same re LC crews as what I took from the main body.
I've not yet read your scans (will do it now), but suspect you're gonna save me the effort of making good on my posdt last night, and hopefully broaden my own limited knowledge.
 

QRK2

LE
I've not yet read your scans (will do it now), but suspect you're gonna save me the effort of making good on my posdt last night, and hopefully broaden my own limited knowledge.

If you can narrow down the Bn I may be able to find more mentions.
 
Tell me more of this Ladd bloke.

Wot I know is that my Grandad entered Europe in Sept 1944 as an Indep Inf Bde, (Army Troops) part of the Canadian Army, and wound up at Buxtehude (occupying the Kriegsmarin HQ facilities, from which I have a few looted schnappsglaser) at VE day.

Whatever plans had been laid for their intended deployment were chucked out of the window at very little notice (one presumes, from the timing, because of the acute manpower shortage that arose during the beachhead fighting and led to at least RA and RAF ack Ack gunners by the thousand being re-badged Infantry around that time)
Interesting, since 116 Brigade was only formed on 1 January 1945:



Yes many men transferred from all over into the infantry. I read somewhere ages ago about how several hundred RAF Regiment men became , by the stroke of a pen, members of 2nd Battalion Scots Guards.
 
several hundred RAF Regiment men became , by the stroke of a pen, members of 2nd Battalion Scots Guards.
Much vaunted "British Army Regimental System" in action, vintage WW2

Much the same thing was happening in WW1, from 1916 onwards, but the facts have never been allowed to get in the way of the legend.

Blokes under fire don't dig out blind for each other because of what happened at Waterloo.

They do it when they're decently trained, and well-led: well-led means (in part) that at the smallest possible sub-unit level - say, half-section - NCOs and officers see to it that newbies replacing the departed become part of the team sooner rather than later.

It's no coincidence that in NI a 4-man team was called a 'brick'

Try building a house, much less a fortress, out of bricks made of sand.
 

Glad_its_all_over

ADC
Book Reviewer
Much vaunted "British Army Regimental System" in action, vintage WW2

Much the same thing was happening in WW1, from 1916 onwards, but the facts have never been allowed to get in the way of the legend.

Blokes under fire don't dig out blind for each other because of what happened at Waterloo.

They do it when they're decently trained, and well-led: well-led means (in part) that at the smallest possible sub-unit level - say, half-section - NCOs and officers see to it that newbies replacing the departed become part of the team sooner rather than later.

It's no coincidence that in NI a 4-man team was called a 'brick'

Try building a house, much less a fortress, out of bricks made of sand.
That attention to unit cohesion, wherever the folk in the battalion originated, was important for a nation which was running short of manpower for the sharp end by late 1944. British formations were rotated out of contact and rested and some attention was paid to matching replacements to units and to integrating replacements into sub-units while out of the line, in contrast to the US system, which simply left formations in contact and sent replacements straight into battle, with predictably high mortality rates for New Guys.
 
That attention to unit cohesion, wherever the folk in the battalion originated, was important for a nation which was running short of manpower for the sharp end by late 1944. British formations were rotated out of contact and rested and some attention was paid to matching replacements to units and to integrating replacements into sub-units while out of the line, in contrast to the US system, which simply left formations in contact and sent replacements straight into battle, with predictably high mortality rates for New Guys.
Fvckin' A

I studied cohesion for my Staff College Commandant's Paper submission.

No doubt in my mind that the Yanks had it more back asswards than the Brits or Germans, but from a few conversations I've had with WW2 veterans over time, I'd simply say we shouldn't kid ourselves about how consistent was our system, or how good the products.
 

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